Government House, Brisbane

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Government House
Government House, Sir John & Lady Lavarack, Brisbane 1947.jpg
Sir John and Lady Lavarack outside Government House, ca. 1947
Alternative names Fernberg
General information
Type Vice-regal residence
Architectural style Italianate
Address 170 Fernberg Road, Paddington
Town or city Brisbane
Country Australia
Coordinates 27°27′46″S 152°59′25″E / 27.462852°S 152.990332°E / -27.462852; 152.990332Coordinates: 27°27′46″S 152°59′25″E / 27.462852°S 152.990332°E / -27.462852; 152.990332
Opening 1865
Owner Government of Queensland
Design and construction
Architect Benjamin Backhouse
Website
www.govhouse.qld.gov.au/government_house/history.aspx

Government House, or 'Fernberg', is located in the Brisbane suburb of Paddington, in Queensland, Australia. It is the official residence of the Governor of Queensland, the representative of Queen Elizabeth II in Queensland.

It is to Government House that the Premier travels when he or she wishes to request from the Governor a dissolution of Parliament and the calling of a general election. Following the outcome of such elections, the Governor appoints the Premier and Ministry, and the swearing-in of members takes place at Government House.

Government House Open Day, when it is open to the general public, is held each year, usually on Australia Day, 26 January and Queensland Day, 6 June.

History[edit]

The original building was designed by Benjamin Backhouse and constructed in 1865 for Johann Heussler.[1] In the 1880s a subsequent owner, John Stevenson, employed architect Richard Gailey who doubled the size of the building, transforming it into an Italianate mansion. The property was purchased by the Government of Queensland in June 1911.[1]

A section of natural bushland at the back of the property was retained while formal gardens were developed close to the house. In 1937, the addition of a new eastern wing which contained a reception room, billiard room and supper room was completed.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gregory, Helen; Dianne Mclay (2010). Building Brisbane's History: Structure, Sculptures, Stories and Secrets. Warriewood, New South Wales: Woodslane Press. p. 82. ISBN 9781921606199. 

External links[edit]