Immigration to Finland

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Number of Allophones, i.e. residents with another native language than Finnish, Swedish or Sami, in Finland, 1980-2011, according to Statistics Finland. [1]

Immigration to Finland is the process by which people migrate to Finland to reside in the country. Many, but not all, become Finnish citizens. People have been migrating to the geographic region of Finland for hundreds of years, with rates of immigration and source countries varying throughout time.

Immigration has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout much of the history of Finland. The economic, social, and political aspects of immigration have caused controversy regarding ethnicity, economic benefits, jobs for non-immigrants, settlement patterns, impact on upward social mobility, crime, and voting behavior.

As of 2011, there are 140,000 foreign born people residing in Finland, which corresponds to 2.7% of the population. Numerous polls in 2010 indicated that the majority of the Finnish people wants to limit immigration to the country in order to preserve regional cultural diversity. [2]

History[edit]

Further information: History of Finland

Immigration has been a major factor of population growth and cultural change throughout Finland. Today there are 140,000 foreign born people residing in Finland. Foreign born individuals correspond to 2.7% of the population of Finland. However, as of 2011 there are 244,827 persons with a foreign first language (other than Finnish, Swedish or Sami), who account 4.5% of the population.[3] The largest groups appear to be Russians, Estonians, and Somalis. Meanwhile, immigration from Sweden has halted the decrease in the Swedish-speaking population.

Demographics[edit]

Further information: Demographics of Finland

Religion[edit]

Further information: Religion in Finland

Politics[edit]

Further information: Politics of Finland

Legal issues[edit]

Further information: Finnish nationality law

Immigration in popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]