Kalács

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Kalács
Lob NARkult 09.JPG
Place of origin
Hungary, Ukraine
Main ingredients
Flour, milk, eggs
Cookbook:Kalács  Kalács

Kalács (pronounced [ˈkɒlaːtʃ]) is a Hungarian sweet bread very similar to brioche, usually baked in a braided form, and traditionally considered an Easter food. The word comes from the Slavic languages and refers to the original rounded form of the bread.[1] Similar types of bread also exist in other Central European and Eastern European countries, such as Kalach in Ukraine and Russia.

Preparation[edit]

Until the end of the 19th century, the preparation of kalács was similar to that of everyday bread; the difference was in the shape, and in the better/quality flour used for the kalács. Nowadays kalács is prepared from dough enriched with milk and eggs.[2] Kalács is baked in an oven or brick oven, sometimes directly on the stones of the brick oven, or on a baking sheet.

Folklore[edit]

Kalács is part of the traditional Easter menu in Hungary, often consecrated together with ham in Catholic churches.[3] In the Szeged region at All Saints unfilled kalács was baked called All Saints' Kalács (mindönszentök kalácsa, kóduskalács = Beggar's Kalács), which was given to beggars at the gate of the graveyard. Also kalács was given to beggars praying at the graveyard's gate in Csallóköz to prevent the dead from returning.[4] Giving kalács to beggars is the Christian form of the pagan tradition of treating the dead.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Balassa Iván; Ortutay Gyula (1980). Magyar néprajz. Budapest: Corvina Kiadó. ISBN 963-13-0946-0. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  2. ^ Ortutay Gyula (1979). Magyar néprajzi lexikon II. (F–Ka). Budapest: Akadémiai. ISBN 963-05-1287-4. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  3. ^ Paládi-Kovács Attila, ed. (1988). Magyar néprajz. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó. ISBN 963-05-4922-0. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  4. ^ Paládi-Kovács Attila, ed. (1988). Magyar néprajz. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó. ISBN 963-05-4922-0. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  5. ^ Bálint Sándor (2004). Ünnepi kalendárium 2. A Mária-ünnepek és jelesebb napok hazai és közép-európai hagyományvilágából (2008-10-04). Budapest: Neumann Kht. ISBN 963-360-044-8. 

External links[edit]

in Hungarian: