List of British regional nicknames

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The United Kingdom has many nicknames for residents of its countries, cities and regions, for example, residents of Liverpool are referred to as Liverpudlians or Scousers. Some of these names are a badge of pride, in other cases they can be considered offensive.


A - B[edit]

Aberdeen 
Aberdonian or simply A Don
Arbroath 
Red Lichtie or Lichtie, Codheid
Barnsley 
Tykes,[1] Colliers (a former mining community), Dingles (by people from Sheffield)
Barrow in Furness 
Barrovian, Shipbuilder
Bath 
Bathonians
Birkenhead 
Birkonian
Birmingham 
Brummie[2]
Black Country 
Yam Yam,[3] Ninehead
Blackburn 
The unchosen ones
Blackpool 
Blackpudlian,[4] Sand grown 'un, Donkey Lasher
Bolton 
Trotters
Bradford 
Bradfordian
Bramley (West Yorkshire) 
Villager
Bristol 
Ciderheads, Bristolian
Brighton 
Brightonians
Britain 
Brit,[5] Britons,[5] British, Britisher, Limeys in Canada and the United States,[6] Pommys in Australia and New Zealand.[7]
Burnley 
Burnleyites. For a derogatory term there is Dingles, a reference to Burnley's proximity to Yorkshire and the family from the TV soap operaEmmerdale (normally used by people from Blackburn, Preston and other parts of Lancashire)
Bury 
Shakers

C - D[edit]

Caithness 
Gallach[8]
Carlisle 
Carliol
Cambridge 
Cantabrigian
Cardiganshire 
Cardi[9]
Chelmsford 
Chelmsfordian [10]
Cheltenham 
Cheltonian
Chester 
Cestrian
Chesterfield 
Cestrefeldian, Spireite.
Colchester 
Colcestrian, Colchie, Roman, Camuloonie, Steamie, Castler. Cross'n'Crowner (after Colchester's coat of arms).
Congleton 
Congletonian.
Cornwall 
Cornish, Kernowick, Merry-Jack, Mera-Jack, Uncle Jack or Cousin Jack (when abroad), Janner
Coventry 
Coventrian, Godivas
Cranfield 
Fr.Damien, Gummy bear, Mountain Fakoor (Dummy version)
Crawley  
Insect[11]
Cumbria 
Cumbrian
Darwen 
Darrener
Devon 
Devonian, Janner
Doncaster 
knights
Dumfries 
Doonhamer
Dundee 
Dundonian,
Durham 
Posh Geordie, Pitt Yakker (due to Durham's mining heritage)

E - G[edit]

Edinburgh 
Edinbronian, Edinburger, Edinbourgeois, Edin, The Burgh, Edinbugger, Embra
England 
Sassenach, Red Coat, Inglish,[12] Nigel, Guffie, (in Northeast Scotland), Sais, Englandshire (in Scotland), The Shire (in Scotland).
Essex 
Essex Calf (archaic), Eastie, Essexer, Esser, wideboys, Saxon, slags, Scimitars (from the County Arms)
Exeter 
Exonian
Forest of Dean 
Forester
Fraserburgh 
Brocher[13]
Fulham 
Fulhamite
Glasgow 
Glaswegian,[13][14] Keelie,[15][16] Weegie,[17]
Goole 
Goolie
Grimsby 
Grimbarian, Cod Head (after the fishing port in Grimsby)
Guisborough 
Guisborian[18] Also used as name for alumni of Guisborough Grammar School and Prior Pursglove College.
Gillingham
Chavs, Medwayers
Gosport 
Turk-towners

H - K[edit]

Hartlepool 
Monkey Hanger[19] or Poolie or Hartlepudlian
Horsham 
Horshamite
Kent 
Yellow Tails (French nickname for people from Kent)
Kingston upon Hull 
Hullensian, Hullian
Kirkcaldy 
Langtonian
Ipswich 
Twelve Toes, Tractor Boys
Isle of Wight 
Caulkhead (named after the caulking of boats)
Kirriemuir 
Kirriemairian
Heywood Lancashire 
Monkey town [20]

L[edit]

Lancashire 
Lancastrian; Yonner (specifically south-eastern Lancashire)
Leeds 
Loiner,[21] Leodensian (as heard in the song "I Predict a Riot" by The Kaiser Chiefs).
Leicester 
Rat-eye (from the Roman name for the city: Ratae), Chisits (from the pronunciation of "how much is it," which sounds like "I'm a chisit"); Foxes
Leicestershire 
Beanbelly (from the eating of broad beans)[22]
Leigh 
Lobbygobbler, Leyther
Lincolnshire 
Yellow belly (after a species of frog common in the Lincolnshire and East Anglian Fens)[23]
Liverpool 
Liverpudlian,[24] Scouse or Scouser,[25] Mickey Mouse[26]
Antonyms
Plastic Scouser: a person who purports to be from Liverpool, but is not.[27] Woolyback, or Wool: anyone not from Liverpool, but in particular refers to people living in the surrounding towns such as Birkenhead, Ellesmere Port, Runcorn, Warrington, Widnes, Wigan and St Helens.[28][29]
Llanelli 
Turk
London 
Limey, Londoner, Del Boy, Shandy, Cockney (East End)
Loughborough 
Loughburian
Luton 
Lutonian, Hatter

M - N[edit]

Macclesfield 
Maxonian
Maidenhead 
Maidonian
Manchester 
Mancunian, Manc/Mank
Mansfield 
Scabs, The Stags.
Marlow 
Marlovian
Malmesbury 
Jackdaw
Melton Mowbray 
Meltonian
Middlesbrough 
Smoggie,[30] an abbreviation of Smog Monster[31]
Milton Keynes 
Cattle, Plastic Cow-Jockey, Thief (reference to the transfer of Wimbledon football club to Milton Keynes).
Montrose 
Gable-endies
Nantwich 
Dabber
Neath 
Abbey-Jack, blacks, black-jacks.
Newcastle 
Geordie, Novocastrian, Magpie, Mag
Northamptonshire 
Northantonian
Northern England 
Northerner, Northern Monkey, Northcountryman
North Wales 
Gog[32]
Norwich
Carrot Cruncher, Country Bumpkin, Norfolk Dumpling, Norvician
Nottingham
Nottinghamian, Bogger
Nuneaton
Codder, Treacletowner

O - R[edit]

Oldham 
Yonner (from Oldham pronunciation of 'yonder' as in 'up yonner') roughy head as in rugby league team.also royton in oldham are known as royton 7s,to do with the English civil war
Orkney 
Orcadian
Oxford 
Oxonian
Paisley 
Buddie,[33]
Peterborough 
Peterborian
Peterhead 
Bluemogganer, Blue-Tooner
Plymouth 
Janner. Originally a person who spoke with a Devon accent,[34][35] now simply any West Countryman.[34] In naval slang, this is specifically a person from Plymouth.[35]
Portsmouth 
Pompey, Pomponian, Plastic Cockney/Skate, Pompeyite
Rotherham 
Rotherhamer, Chuckle Brother (named after t'local legends Chuckle Brothers)
Royston, Hertfordshire 
Crows

S[edit]

Salford 
Salfordian
Scotland 
Scottie, Jocks[36] Mac, Sweaties, Scotch (slightly xenophobic)
Scunthorpe
Scunthonian[37]
Sheffield 
Sheffielder. Dee daa.
Shropshire 
Salopian
South Shields  
Sand dancer
Southampton 
Mush, Scummer (used by people from Portsmouth)
Southern England 
Southerner, Southern Fairy, Shandy Drinkers
Southport 
Sandgrounder
Stoke-on-Trent 
Potter, Clay Head, Stokie, Jug Head
Stockport 
Stopfordian, Stoconian
Strood 
Long tails, Stroodle
Stroud 
Stroudie [38]
Sunderland 
Mackem[39]
Sutherland 
Cattach
Swansea 
Jack, Swansea Jack
Swindon 
Moonraker
Stafford 
Staffordian

T - V[edit]

Tarbert, Loch Fyne 
Dooker (named after guillemot and razorbill, sea-birds once a popular food among Tarbert natives)
Tavistock 
Tavonian
Teesside 
Smoggie, 'Borough Boys (after Middlesbrough)
Truro 
Truronian
Ulverston 
Ulverstonian

W[edit]

Wales 
Taff (slightly xenophobic),[40] Taffy[citation needed], Trog[citation needed]
Walsall 
Saddler
Warrington 
Wire, Wirepuller (after the local wire industry),
Welshpool 
Souped
Westhoughton
Keawyeds (Cowheads, after local legend)
West Riding of Yorkshire 
Wessie (in other parts of Yorkshire)
Westmorland 
Westmerian
Weymouth and Portland 
Kimberlin (Portland name for a person from Weymouth)
Whitehaven 
Marra, Jam Eater
Widnes 
Chemic
Wigan 
Pie-eater, Purrer, Woolyback, Wiganer
Wiltshire 
Moonraker
Winchester 
Wintonian
Wolverhampton 
Wulfrunian
Workington 
Jam Eater
Wrexham 
Goat

Y - Z[edit]

Yorkshire 
Tyke, Yorkie, Yorkshireman

See also[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "tyke", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 674)
  2. ^ "Brummie", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 95)
  3. ^ "Wolverhampton researches Black Country dialect". The Guardian. 2003-01-27. Retrieved 2010-10-03. 
  4. ^ Viner, Brian (11 April 2001). "Welcome to fabulous Las Blackpool, Lancashire". independent.co.uk. Retrieved 29 September 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Brit", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 92)
  6. ^ "limey", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 401)
  7. ^ "pommy", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 506–507)
  8. ^ Transactions of the Gaelic Society. Gaelic Society of Inverness. p. 97. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  9. ^ "Cardi", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 119)
  10. ^ "Chelmsford residents are known as Chelmsfordians". www.famouswhy.com. 20 October 2010. Retrieved 15 July 2014. 
  11. ^ "MOST Crawley residents have probably, at some time, referred to the town by its well-known nickname – Creepy Crawley". Thisissussex.co.uk. 20 October 2010. Retrieved 9 June 2014. 
  12. ^ "Sassenach", (Robinson 1985, pp. 581)
  13. ^ a b Adrian Room (2003). Placenames of the world: origins and meanings of the names for over 5000 natural features, countries, capitals, territories, cities, and historic sites. McFarland. p. 426. ISBN 978-0-7864-1814-5. 
  14. ^ Resistance in James Kelman’s 'How ... - Google Books. Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  15. ^ "Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Nicknames". Bartleby.com. Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  16. ^ "keelie", (Robinson 1985, pp. 335)
  17. ^ Payam Zarrabizadeh. "Off the Brochure Travel Guide: Glasgow, Scotland". Peter Greenberg. Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  18. ^ "Old Guisborian 7793". Guisborough Freemasons. Retrieved 2011-09-05. 
  19. ^ "The Hartlepool Monkey, Who hung the monkey?". This is Hartlepool. Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  20. ^ "Ten Thousand Years in Monkey Town: Why 'Monkey Town'?". 
  21. ^ "Loiner", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 406)
  22. ^ Evans, Arthur Benoni (1881) Leicestershire Words, Phrases, and Proverbs; enlarged edition, edited by Sebastian Evans. London: N. Trübner for English Dialect Society; p. 101
  23. ^ "Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Nicknames". Bartleby.com. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  24. ^ Cambridge Dictionaries Online, Liverpudlian
  25. ^ Fazakerley, p. 24
  26. ^ "Mickey Mouse" - rhyming slang for "Scouse", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 429)
  27. ^ www.allwords.com, Plastic Scouser
  28. ^ www.Slang.org.uk, Woolyback
  29. ^ www.allwords.com, Woolyback
  30. ^ Harley, Shaun (2007-10-16). "'I was made in Middlesbrough'". BBC News. Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  31. ^ Milward, Richard (2010-01-28). "'Tonight I'm a rock'n'roll scribe: Attack of the slightly slurring smog monster'". Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 2011-08-27. 
  32. ^ "gog", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 295)
  33. ^ "Paisley Buddies - Paisley Scotland". Paisley.org.uk. 6 April 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014. 
  34. ^ a b "janner", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 363)
  35. ^ a b Cyril Tawney (1987). "Glossary". Grey funnel lines: traditional song & verse of the Royal Navy, 1900–1970. Taylor & Francis. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-7102-1270-2. 
  36. ^ "jock", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 369)
  37. ^ "Scunthonian", (BBC 2002)
  38. ^ "What makes a Stroudie?". BBC. 
  39. ^ "Quiz: How Much of a Mackem are YOU?". Sunderland Echo. 2009-01-04. Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  40. ^ "taff", (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2007, pp. 369)

References[edit]