List of the oldest public high schools in the United States

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Boston Latin School, the oldest public high school in the United States.

The following are the oldest public high schools in the United States that are still in operation. While some of these schools have operated as private schools in the past, all are currently public schools. The list does not include schools that have closed or consolidated with another school to form a new institution. The list is ordered by date of creation, and currently includes schools formed before 1870.

  1. Boston Latin School (1635), Boston, Massachusetts[1][2]
  2. Hartford Public High School (1638), Hartford, Connecticut[3]
  3. Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (1648), Cambridge, Massachusetts[4]
  4. Hopkins Academy (1664), Hadley, Massachusetts[5]
  5. Academy of Richmond County (1783), Augusta, Georgia[6]
  6. Glynn Academy (1788), Brunswick, Georgia[7]
  7. Westford Academy (1792), Westford, Massachusetts[8]
  8. Newburgh Free Academy (1796), Newburgh, New York[9]
  9. Woodstock Academy (1801), Woodstock, Connecticut[10]
  10. Bacon Academy (1803), Colchester, Connecticut[11]
  11. Hampden Academy (1803), Hampden, Maine[12]
  12. Columbia High School (1814), Maplewood, New Jersey[13]
  13. Delaware Academy (1819), Delhi, New York[14]
  14. English High School of Boston (1821), Boston, Massachusetts[2]
  15. Portland High School (1821), Portland, Maine[15]
  16. Kentucky School for the Deaf (1823), Danville, Kentucky[16]
  17. Prattsburgh Central School (1823), Prattsburgh, New York[17]
  18. New Bedford High School (1827), New Bedford, Massachusetts[18]
  19. Keene High School (1828), Keene, New Hampshire[19]
  20. Lahainaluna High School (1831), Maui, Hawaii[20]
  21. Leon High School (1831), Tallahassee, Florida[21]
  22. Lowell High School (1831), Lowell, Massachusetts[22]
  23. Newburyport High School (1831), Newburyport, Massachusetts[23]
  24. Woodward High School (1831), Cincinnati, Ohio[24]
  25. Cambridge High School (1834), Cambridge, Illinois[25]
  26. Medford High School (1835), Medford, Massachusetts[22]
  27. Bellevue High School (1836), Bellevue, Michigan[26]
  28. Central High School (1836), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania[27]
  29. Auburn High School (1837), Auburn, Alabama[28]
  30. Windsor High School (1837), Windsor, New York[29]
  31. Barringer High School (1838), Newark, New Jersey[30]
  32. Cohasset High School (1838), Cohasset, Massachusetts[2]
  33. Nantucket High School (1838), Nantucket, Massachusetts[31]
  34. Taunton High School (1838), Taunton, Massachusetts[32]
  35. Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind (1838), Staunton, Virginia[33]
  36. Baltimore City College (1839), Baltimore, Maryland[34]
  37. Gloucester High School (Massachusetts) (1839), Gloucester, Massachusetts[31]
  38. Brighton High School (1841), Boston, Massachusetts[35]
  39. Haverhill High School (1841), Haverhill, Massachusetts[36]
  40. Brookline High School (1843), Brookline, Massachusetts[2]
  41. Classical High School (1843), Providence, Rhode Island[37]
  42. Drury High School (1843), North Adams, Massachusetts[38]
  43. Tennessee School for the Deaf (1844), Knoxville, Tennessee[39]
  44. Western High School (Baltimore, Maryland) (1844), Baltimore, Maryland[40]
  45. Charlestown High School (1845), Boston, Massachusetts[31]
  46. Lyons High School (1845), Lyons, New York[41]
  47. Mary D. Bradford High School (1845), Kenosha, Wisconsin[42]
  48. New Braunfels High School (1845), New Braunfels, Texas[43]
  49. Windsor High School (Vermont) (1845), Windsor, Vermont[44]
  50. Chelsea High School (Massachusetts) (1846) Chelsea, Massachusetts[2]
  51. Concord High School (New Hampshire) (1846) Concord, New Hampshire[45]
  52. Georgia School for the Deaf (1846) Cave Spring, Georgia[46]
  53. Manchester Central High School (1846) Manchester, New Hampshire[47]
  54. Biddeford High School (1848) Biddeford, Maine[48]
  55. Lockport High School (1848) Lockport, New York[41]
  56. Philadelphia High School for Girls (1848) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania[49]
  57. B.M.C. Durfee High School (1849) Fall River, Massachusetts[36]
  58. Charlotte High School (Charlotte, Michigan) (1849) Charlotte, Michigan[50]
  59. Fitchburg High School (1849) Fitchburg, Massachusetts[36]
  60. Lawrence High School (Massachusetts) (1849) Lawrence, Massachusetts[31]
  61. Rockport High School (1849) Rockport, Massachusetts[32]
  62. Waltham High School (1849) Waltham, Massachusetts[31]
  63. Ypsilanti High School (1849) Ypsilanti, Michigan[51]
  64. Arundel High School (1854) Gambrills, Maryland[52]
  65. Andover High School (Massachusetts) (1856) Andover, Massachusetts[53]
  66. Louisville Male High School (1856) Louisville, Kentucky[citation needed]
  67. Pioneer High School (Ann Arbor, Michigan) (1856) Ann Arbor, Michigan[54]
  68. Peoria High School (Illinois) (1856) Peoria, Illinois[55]
  69. Texas School for the Deaf (Texas) (1856) Austin, Texas[56]
  70. University High School (1857) Normal, Illinois
  71. St. Mark's School (1865) Southborough, MA[57]
  72. Morristown High School (1869) Morristown, New Jersey[58]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Boston Latin School". Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1761.
  3. ^ R.J. Luke Williams, Hartford Public High School: A Historic School, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  4. ^ The Harvard Crimson, "Fifteen Minutes: Trouble in the House", Retrieved December 12, 2008.
  5. ^ Hopkins Academy Alumni Association, "[1]", Retrieved January 9, 2010.
  6. ^ Academy of Richmond County, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  7. ^ Glynn Academy > Campus History, Retrieved June 25, 2008.
  8. ^ Simmons, Carrie (2007-09-07). "History of Westford Academy". Westford Eagle. Retrieved 2008-08-22. 
  9. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1810.
  10. ^ Woodstock Academy, Woodstock Academy, founded 1801, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  11. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1705.
  12. ^ http://www.ha.sad22.us, History of Hampden Academy, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  13. ^ J. Fanning, Pinkerton Academy (1814) Columbia High School History Overview, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  14. ^ Delhi Central School District, History of Delaware Academy, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  15. ^ Portland High School, School History: The Heritage of Portland High School, Retrieved February 13, 2008.
  16. ^ National Park Service, Jacobs Hall, Kentucky School for the Deaf, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  17. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1812.
  18. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1764.
  19. ^ Simon Goodell Griffin;, et al., A history of the town of Keene from 1732, when the township was granted by Massachusetts, to 1874, when it became a city., Keene, N.H., Sentinel Print. Co., 1904, p. 404.
  20. ^ Hawaii Department of Education, [2], Retrieved December 12, 2008.
  21. ^ Leon High School Alumni Association, Leon High School History, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  22. ^ a b Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1763.
  23. ^ Newburyport High School, The Clipper's Compass: A Student Handbook, 65th ed.
  24. ^ The Early History of Cincinnati Public Schools, Retrieved August 14, 2008.
  25. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1714.
  26. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1767.
  27. ^ Amy B. Werbel, "For "Our Age and Country:" Nineteenth-Century Art Education at Central High School", Central High School Alumni Exhibition, Philadelphia, Pa.: Woodmere Art Museum, 2002, pp. 6-12.
  28. ^ Mollie Hollifield, Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain (S.l.: s.n., 1955), 72; "Auburn Town Lots for Sale", Columbus Enquirer, December 22, 1836; "To the Public.", Columbus Enquirer, February 22, 1838.
  29. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1815.
  30. ^ Barringer High School, Home of the Blue Bears: Barringer High School History, Retrieved February 13, 2008.
  31. ^ a b c d e Inglis, Alexander James (1911). The Rise of the High School in Massachusetts, Columbia University, p. 97. [3]
  32. ^ a b Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1765.
  33. ^ Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  34. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1758.
  35. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1760.
  36. ^ a b c Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1762.
  37. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1851.
  38. ^ 1898 Drury High School, Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  39. ^ A History of the School, retrieved July 26, 2011.
  40. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1759.
  41. ^ a b Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1809.
  42. ^ A History of Kenosha Central Senior High School, retrieved July 26, 2011.
  43. ^ Dabney, Edgar Robert, The Settlement of New Braunfels and the History of Its Earlier Schools, University of Texas, 1927.
  44. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1868.
  45. ^ Concord High School Alumni History 1842-1861, retrieved July 26, 2011.
  46. ^ Georgia Deaf History, retrieved July 26, 2011.
  47. ^ Principal's Message, retrieved July 26, 2011.
  48. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1755.
  49. ^ Public Education in Philadelphia: Philadelphia High School for Girls, retrieved July 26, 2011.
  50. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1768.
  51. ^ Annual reports of the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902. Report of the Commissioner of Education. Volume 2., Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 1775.
  52. ^ http://arundelclassof1963.com/some_history.htm
  53. ^ History of Andover, retrieved October 8, 2011.
  54. ^ [4], retrieved August 11, 2012.
  55. ^ [5], retrieved September 7, 2012.
  56. ^ [6], Texas School for the Deaf at Austin, Texas still operation. tsd.state.tx.us retrieved December 24, 2012.
  57. ^ [7]
  58. ^ [8], retrieved June 14th, 2014.