Stewart Grand Prix

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Stewart
Stewart logo.png
Full name Stewart Grand Prix
Base Milton Keynes, United Kingdom [1]
Founder(s) Jackie Stewart
Paul Stewart
Noted staff Alan Jenkins
Gary Anderson
Noted drivers Brazil Rubens Barrichello
United Kingdom Johnny Herbert
Denmark Jan Magnussen
Netherlands Jos Verstappen
Next name Jaguar Racing
Formula One World Championship career
Debut 1997 Australian Grand Prix
Races competed 49
Engines Ford
Constructors'
Championships
0 (best finish: 4th, 1999)
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories 1
Pole positions 1
Fastest laps 0
Final race 1999 Japanese Grand Prix

Stewart Grand Prix is a former Formula One constructor and racing team. The team was formed by three times Formula One champion Jackie Stewart and his son Paul Stewart in 1996. The team competed in F1, as the Ford works-supported team, for only three seasons, from 1997 to 1999. The 1999 season was by far its strongest, yielding one win (Johnny Herbert at the European Grand Prix) and one pole position (Rubens Barrichello at the French Grand Prix) en route to finishing fourth overall in the Constructors Championship.

At the end of 1999, Ford bought the team outright and it was renamed Jaguar Racing. In 2004 Jaguar Racing was sold to energy drink company Red Bull and was rebranded Red Bull Racing in 2005.

Origins[edit]

The team's origins are traced back to 1988 when Jackie Stewart's son Paul set up Paul Stewart Racing at the end of 1988 when he bought the Gary Evans Motorsport Team. His team entered the 1989 British Formula 3 season with a workforce of 10 employees. The team attracted the sponsor Camel. Paul Stewart had driven the car alongside German Otto Rensing. The team's first season had not been hugely successful with a sole win for Stewart at Snetterton. In 1990, the team expanded with a move to their headquarters in Milton Keynes and was divided into three sections; preparation for European Formula 3000, Formula 3 and Formula Vauxhall Lotus. Within a few years, the team enjoyed huge success in Motor Racing by winning 12 titles and 119 races in various categories.[2]

While in late 1995, Stewart Racing (like top competitor DAMS) expressed disinterest in moving up to F1,[3] considering short-lived entries Simtek, Pacific and Forti either had folded or looked to fold,[3] this decision was reversed in January 1996 when Jackie Stewart secured a five-year development deal with Ford to make it a factory team. Ford had been in a deal as a factory engine supplier to Sauber before this.[4] The team would be based in the United Kingdom with finance from Malaysia as a promotion for the country in general. Stewart were in consultation with John Barnard about a business plan with a budget of £24 million.[5]

Racing history[edit]

Stewart SF01, driven by Jan Magnussen in Stewart's debut season. From The Donington Collection.

1997[edit]

The first car named the Stewart SF01 was launched on 19 December 1996.[5] With backing from Ford, Stewart GP entered the 1997 Australian Grand Prix with drivers Rubens Barrichello and Jan Magnussen. The only success of their first year came at the rain-affected Monaco Grand Prix where Barrichello finished second. Magnussen in the second car finished just outside the points in 7th after losing his front wing at the chicane. Elsewhere, the cars were consistent midfield runners and Barrichello was often in a position to challenge for points. Stewart's reliability was poor, as the Ford Zetec-R V10 engine installed in the SF01 chassis proved to be extremely fragile. This restricted the team to just eight classified finishes out of a possible thirty-four.

Rubens Barrichello driving for the Stewart Grand Prix team in Montreal in 1997. The tartan decoration indicates the Stewarts' origins in Scotland.

1998[edit]

1998 was a struggle for the team, with neither driver able to step onto the podium. Indeed, points were hard to come by, and after a number of poor drives Jan Magnussen was replaced by Dutchman Jos Verstappen, ironically the race after Magnussen scored his first and only Formula One points at the accident-laden Canadian Grand Prix.

In the end the driver change did not seem to make a great difference as Verstappen also struggled with the car, but he did push Barrichello harder than Magnussen[citation needed]. Verstappen left the team at the end of the season after Johnny Herbert joined but was less than happy with the set up of Stewart and blasted it for its favoritism to Barrichello and accused it of being unable to run more than one car[citation needed].

At the end of the 1998 season, technical director Alan Jenkins left Stewart Grand Prix, and was replaced by Jordan's Gary Anderson.[6]

1999[edit]

Johnny Herbert took Stewart's first and only F1 win in 1999.

After Ford acquired Cosworth in July 1998, they risked designing and building a brand-new engine for 1999. The SF3 was quick out of the box, however for Ford both cars over-heated on the grid of the first race, the Australian Grand Prix, after qualifying competitively. This put Herbert out instantly and made Barrichello start from the pit lane. Barrichello received a stop-go penalty during the race and finished 5th. The car was consistently competitive throughout the season, however the engine initially proved fragile as both cars blew their engines at the Brazilian race which meant the engine was rarely run at full power. Stewart's competitiveness was affirmed by running first in Brazil for a long spell of the race and qualifying on pole for the French Grand Prix with Barrichello. Johnny Herbert won a popular victory at the rain soaked 1999 European Grand Prix at the new Nürburgring after other leading contenders crashed off the track or lost time in the pits changing tyres.[7] Barrichello finished third, in a result most observers indicated that Stewart deserved given their strength over the season. Johnny Herbert also became unwittingly influential in the championship at the next and penultimate race, the Malaysian Grand Prix. Running 3rd behind the Ferraris of Michael Schumacher and Eddie Irvine, a mistake in the closing laps allowed Mika Häkkinen to slip past and claim the final podium position which gave the championship contender vital points. The Ferraris were disqualified for car irregularities and the win allowed Häkkinen to gain his second championship. The Stewarts as a result finished 2nd and 3rd in the race. However Ferrari won an appeal and the initial result was reinstated. Häkkinen however went on to win the championship and Stewart came 4th in the Constructors Championship beating teams such as Williams and Benetton. Stewart's last race was the 1999 Japanese Grand Prix.

After Ford increased its commitment by buying the team out, it became known as Jaguar Racing for the 2000 season.[8] Poor results however, led to the team being sold for the 2005 season, becoming Red Bull Racing.

Complete Formula One results[edit]

(key) (results in bold indicate pole position)

Year Chassis Engine Tyres No. Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Points WCC
1997 SF01 Ford VJ Zetec-R 3.0 V10 B AUS BRA ARG SMR MON ESP CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA AUT LUX JPN EUR 6 9th
22 Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ret Ret Ret Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 13 14 Ret Ret Ret
23 Denmark Jan Magnussen Ret Ret 10 Ret 7 13 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret 9
1998 SF02 Ford VJ Zetec-R 3.0 V10 B AUS BRA ARG SMR ESP MON CAN FRA GBR AUT GER HUN BEL ITA LUX JPN 5 8th
18 Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ret Ret 10 Ret 5 Ret 5 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 10 11 Ret
19 Denmark Jan Magnussen Ret 10 Ret Ret 12 Ret 6
Netherlands Jos Verstappen 12 Ret Ret Ret 13 Ret Ret 13 Ret
1999 SF3 Ford CR-1 3.0 V10 B AUS BRA SMR MON ESP CAN FRA GBR AUT GER HUN BEL ITA EUR MAL JPN 36 4th
16 Brazil Rubens Barrichello 5 Ret 3 9 DSQ Ret 3 8 Ret Ret 5 10 4 3 5 8
17 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert DNS Ret 10 Ret Ret 5 Ret 12 14 11 11 Ret Ret 1 4 7

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  2. ^ Karolak, Mariusz (2006-08-30). "Paul Stewart - from the PSR to the SGP" (in Polish). Wyprzedz Mnie!. 
  3. ^ a b F1 News > Pacific closing down
  4. ^ F1 News > Stewart gets Ford
  5. ^ a b Hamilton, Maurice (1998). Racing Stewart: The Birth of a Grand Prix Team. Motorbooks International. ISBN 0-7603-0514-5. 
  6. ^ http://fidonet.sensationcontent.com/echomail/grand-prix/ff3c687c95f8716f.html
  7. ^ 1999 European Grand Prix Race Report www.sportinglife.com Retrieved 11 May 2006
  8. ^ "Stewart Grand Prix". F1technical.