Structure of the Australian Army

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Two Bushmasters operated by the 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment during an exercise in 2010

This article describes the current structure of the Australian Army. It includes the army's order of battle and the headquarters locations of major units.

Overview[edit]

The Australian Army is organised into three main elements which report to the Chief of Army; the Headquarters of the 1st Division, Special Operations Command and Forces Command. Headquarters 1st Division is responsible for high-level training activities and is capable of being deployed to command large scale ground operations. It does not have any combat units permanently assigned to it, though it commands units during training activities and the Land Combat Readiness Centre reports to the divisional headquarters. Most of the Army's units report to Forces Command, which is responsible for overseeing their readiness and preparing them for operations. Special Operations Command is responsible for preparing the ADF's special forces units for operational deployments. This organisation came into effect during January 2011; before this time the Army's three regular brigades were permanently assigned to the Headquarters 1st Division.[1][2]

Current order of battle[edit]

The Australian Army's structure in 2012

The following order of battle describes the Army's current organisational structure at the battalion and independent company/squadron level. It does not take into account changes to units' structure and command arrangements associated with operational deployments.

Geographic distribution[edit]

Locations of Australian Army brigade headquarters as at 2012 (Army Reserve formations in cursive)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ Australian Army (2008), pp. 5–8
  2. ^ International Institute for Strategic Studies (2011), p. 223
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Australian Army (2008), p. 7
  4. ^ "Forces Command Raised as Adaptive Army Flies the Flag". Department of Defence. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  5. ^ a b Khosa (2011), p. 24
  6. ^ "HQ 1st Brigade". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  7. ^ "Seventh Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  8. ^ Kennedy, Mitch; Doran, Mark (3 March 2011). "Changes in Artillery". Army (Canberra: Australian Department of Defence). p. 3. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  9. ^ a b Khosa (2011), p. 25
  10. ^ "Defence Community Organisation: Welcome to Townsville" (pdf). Department of Defence. p. 8. Retrieved 4 February 2012. 
  11. ^ a b Department of Defence (2011), p. 2
  12. ^ Department of Defence. "3RAR Arrive in Townsville". Media release. Department of Defence. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  13. ^ Gaze, Jillian (18 March 2010). "Key to Adaptability". Army (Canberra: Australian Department of Defence). p. 5. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  14. ^ Hetherington, Andrew (2 February 2012). "Tying air and land together". Army (Canberra: Australian Department of Defence). p. 24. Retrieved 4 February 2012. 
  15. ^ "RHQ". North West Mobile Force. Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  16. ^ "Unit History". The Pilbara Regt. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  17. ^ a b Khosa (2011), p. 27
  18. ^ Department of Defence (2011), p. 3
  19. ^ Khosa (2011), p. 26
  20. ^ Flint, Clark. "17th Combat Service Support Brigade". Australian Military Medicine Association. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  21. ^ "9 Force Support Battalion". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  22. ^ "Defence Community Organisation: Welcome to Townsville" (pdf). Department of Defence. p. 11. Retrieved 4 February 2012. 
  23. ^ "Key contacts". 3rd Health Support Battalion. Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  24. ^ "Royal Military College of Australia". Australian Army. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f g "Brigades and Formations". 2nd Division. Australian Army. Retrieved 4 February 2012. 
  26. ^ "Signals Corps Officer : Employment Location". Defence Jobs. Department of Defence. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  27. ^ "HQ 4th Brigade". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  28. ^ "HQ 9th Brigade". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  29. ^ "Parliamentary Secretary for Defence – Paterson Barracks remains vital". Media release. Parliamentary Secretary for Defence, Senator The Hon. David Feeney. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  30. ^ "Adelaide Universities Regiment". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  31. ^ "Structure". HQ 11th Brigade. Australian Army. Retrieved 4 February 2012. 
  32. ^ "Western Australian University Regiment". Australian Army. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
Works consulted