United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2014

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United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2014
North Carolina
2012 ←
November 4, 2014 (2014-11-04) → 2016

All 13 North Carolina seats in the United States House of Representatives
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 9 4

The 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina will be held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 to elect the 13 U.S. Representatives from the state of North Carolina, one from each of the state's 13 congressional districts. The elections coincided with other elections to the United States Senate and House of Representatives and various state and local elections, including an election to the U.S. Senate.

Primary elections were held on Tuesday, May 6, 2014. In primaries in which no candidate won more than 40% of the vote (the Democratic primary in the 5th district and the Republican primary in the 6th district), second primary elections (runoffs) were held between the top two candidates on July 15, 2014.[1]

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is located in Northeastern North Carolina and includes towns such as Durham, Elizabeth City, Henderson, Roanoke Rapids, Rocky Mount, Goldsboro and New Bern. The incumbent is Democrat G. K. Butterfield, who has represented the district since 2004. He was re-elected with 75% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of D+19.

Dan Whittacre, who ran against Butterfield in the Democratic primary in 2012, did so again.[2]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic G. K. Butterfield 60,847 81.14%
Democratic Dan Whittacre 14,147 18.86%
Totals 74,994 100%

Arthur Rich, an accountant and candidate for Lieutenant Governor in 2012[4][5] and Brent Shypulefski[2] ran for the Republican nomination.

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Arthur Rich 5,519 51.33%
Republican Brent Shypulefski 5,232 48.67%
Totals 10,751 100%

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is located in central North Carolina and includes all or parts of Alamance, Chatham, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Moore, and Wake counties. The incumbent is Republican Renee Ellmers, who has represented the district since 2011. She was re-elected with 56% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+10.

Republican primary[edit]

Ellmers had considered running for the U.S. Senate[6] but is instead running for re-election. Jim Duncan, the chairman of the Chatham County Republican Party and co-founder of the grassroots organization The Coalition for American Principles, considered a run against Ellmers in the primary,[7] but decided against it.[8] Frank Roche, a conservative internet talk show host and lecturer in economics at Elon University, who ran for District 4 in 2010 and for North Carolina State Treasurer in 2012 ran against Ellmers in the primary.[9][10]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Renee Ellmers 21,412 58.73%
Republican Frank Roche 15,045 41.27%
Totals 36,457 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Three Democrats ran for their party's nomination: singer, actor and activist Clay Aiken,[11][12] former North Carolina Secretary of Commerce Keith Crisco[13] and counselor and candidate for the seat in 2012 Toni Morris.[2][14] Attorney Houston Barnes at first announced that he would run in the Democratic primary as well,[15] but he later withdrew before filing and announced that he would support Aiken.[16]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Clay Aiken 11,678 40.86%
Democratic Keith Crisco 11,288 39.49%
Democratic Toni Morris 5,616 19.65%
Totals 28,582 100%

The results were too close to call even a week later, with Crisco only narrowly behind Aiken, who was only just above the 40% necessary to avoid a runoff.[17] As both candidates were waiting for the results to be certified (this was to be done May 13, 2014), Crisco died suddenly on May 12, after suffering a fall in his home.[17][18] He was 71.[17] Though Crisco had initially said he would not concede,[19] he changed his mind and had planned to concede on May 13.[20]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Renee
Ellmers (R)
Clay
Aiken (D)
Other Undecided
Civitas September 26–28, 2014 400 ± 5% 47% 39% 14%

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is located on the Atlantic coast of North Carolina. It covers the Outer Banks and the counties adjacent to the Pamlico Sound. The incumbent is Republican Walter B. Jones, Jr., who has represented the district since 1995.[21] He was re-elected with 63% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+11.

Taylor Griffin, a one-time aide to United States Senator Jesse Helms and to President George W. Bush, ran in the primary against Jones.[22] Griffin sold his consulting firm in Washington, D.C., and moved back to New Bern.[22] Albin "Big Al" Novinec also ran for the Republican nomination.[2] Craven County Commissioner Scott Dacey considered running in the primary as well, but did not ultimately file.[23][24]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Walter B. Jones, Jr. 22,616 50.89%
Republican Taylor Griffin 20,024 45.06%
Republican Albin "Big Al" Novinec 1,798 4.05%
Totals 44,438 100%

Jason Thigpen, a U.S. Army veteran and founder of the Student Veterans Advocacy Group, first announced that he would challenge Jones in the Republican primary,[25] but then left the Republican Party and said he would run as a Democrat.[21][26] Ultimately, he did not file to run for any party's nomination.[2] Marshall Adame, a retired U.S. Marine, former U.S. Diplomat in Iraq and former member of the Congressional Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan and former U.S. Basra International Airport Director, ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[2]

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is located in northern North Carolina and includes Orange, Durham, Harnett, Chatham and Wake counties. The incumbent is Democrat David Price, who has represented the district since 1997, and previously represented it from 1987 to 1995. He was re-elected with 74% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of D+20.

Price ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. Republican Paul Wright, a trial lawyer, former District Court and Superior Court judge and candidate for Governor of North Carolina in 2012 was the only other candidate to file to run against Price.[2]

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is located in northwestern North Carolina, from the Appalachian Mountains to the Piedmont Triad and includes Watauga, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Davie, Yadkin, Surry, Alleghany, Forsyth, Stokes and Reckingham counties. The incumbent is Republican Virginia Foxx, who has represented the district since 2005. She was re-elected with 58% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+11.

Foxx had considered running for the U.S. Senate[27] but is instead running for re-election. She was opposed in the Republican primary by Philip Doyle.[2]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx 49,572 75.4%
Republican Philip Doyle 16,175 24.6%
Totals 65,747 100%

Four candidates ran for the Democratic nomination: Gardenia Henley, a retired auditor, candidate for the State House in 2010, for Governor in 2012 and for Mayor of Winston-Salem in 2013; Joshua Brannon, a software developer; Michael W. Holleman; and Will Stinson, a candidate for the State House in 2012.[2]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joshua Brannon 8,010 33.05%
Democratic Gardenia Henley 6,417 26.48%
Democratic Michael W. Holleman 5,618 23.18%
Democratic Will Stinson 4,189 17.29%
Totals 24,234 100%

Because Brannon did not secure more than 40 percent of the vote, he and Henley advanced to a runoff.

Democratic primary runoff results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joshua Brannon 2,748 65.57%
Democratic Gardenia Henley 1,443 34.43%
Totals 4,191 100%

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is located in northern North Carolina and includes all of Caswell, Person, Rockingham, Surry and Stokes counties as well as parts of Guilford, Alamance, Durham, Granville and Orange counties. The incumbent is Republican Howard Coble, who has represented the district since 1985. He was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+10.

Citing his health, Coble announced on November 7, 2013 that he would retire and not seek another term in 2014.[29]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Phil
Berger
Mike
Causey
Kenn
Kopf
Zack
Matheny
Jeff
Phillips
Charlie
Sutherland
Bruce
VonCannon
Mark
Walker
Don
Webb
Other/
Undecided
Public Opinion Strategies* April 8–10 2014 300 ±5.66% 36% 6% 6% 14% 38%
Tel Opinion Research April 2014  ? ± ?% 29% 1% 0% 2% 4% 0% 4% 4% 2% 54%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Phil Berger, Jr. 15,127 34.27%
Republican Mark Walker 11,123 25.20%
Republican Bruce VonCannon 5,055 11.45%
Republican Zack Matheny 5,043 11.43%
Republican Jeff Phillips 3,494 7.92%
Republican Don Webb 1,899 4.3%
Republican Mike Causey 1,427 3.23%
Republican Kenn Kopf 510 1.16%
Republican Charlie Sutherland 458 1.04%
Totals 44,136 100%

Because Berger did not win more than 40 percent of the vote, he and Walker advanced to a runoff, which Walker won.

Republican primary runoff results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Walker 18,965 59.85%
Republican Phil Berger, Jr. 12,722 40.15%
Totals 31,687 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Laura Fjeld 19,066 56.16%
Democratic Bruce Davis 14,882 43.84%
Totals 33,948 100%

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Mark
Walker (R)
Laura
Fjeld (D)
Other Undecided
WPA Opinion Research^ September 3–4, 2014 306 ± 5.7% 54% 31% 15%
  • ^ Internal poll for Mark Walker campaign

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is located in southeastern North Carolina and includes Robeson, Cumberland, Sampson, Bladen, Columbus, Brunswick, New Hanover, Pender and Duplin counties. The incumbent is Democrat Mike McIntyre, who has represented the district since 1997. He was re-elected with 50% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+12.

McIntyre is not running for re-election.[37] New Hanover County Commissioner Jonathan Barfield, Jr.[38] and Princeton Town Commissioner Walter A. Martin, Jr. ran for the Democratic nomination.[39][2]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jonathan Barfield, Jr. 21,966 58.25%
Democratic Walter A. Martin, Jr. 15,741 41.75%
Totals 37,707 100%

Former State Senator David Rouzer, who lost to McIntyre in 2012 by just 650 votes following a recount, ran for the Republican nomination for the seat again.[40] Also running were Chris Andrade[2] and New Hanover County Commissioner and former State Senator Haywood "Woody" White.[41]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Rouzer 23,010 53.02%
Republican Haywood "Woody" White 17,389 40.07%
Republican Chris Andrade 3,000 6.91%
Totals 43,399 100%

Attorney J. Wesley Casteen, who ran for a seat on the North Carolina Court of Appeals in 2010, is the Libertarian Party nominee.[42] Louis Harmati, who ran for the state legislature as a Republican in 2012,[43] is running as a write-in candidate.[44]

District 8[edit]

The 8th district is located in southern North Carolina and includes all of Anson, Montgomery, Richmond, Scotland, and Stanly counties, as well as portions of Cabarrus, Davidson, Mecklenburg, Randolph, Robeson, Rowan, and Union counties. The incumbent is Republican Richard Hudson, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, defeating Democratic incumbent Larry Kissell with 53% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+11.

Hudson was unopposed in the Republican primary. Democrat Antonio Blue, the Mayor of Dobbins Heights and a veteran of the U.S. Army, was the only other candidate to file against him.[2]

District 9[edit]

The 9th district is located in south-central North Carolina and includes parts of Iredell, Mecklenburg and Union counties. The incumbent is Republican Robert Pittenger, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected with 52% of the vote in 2012, succeeding retiring Republican incumbent Sue Myrick. The district has a PVI of R+8.

Pittenger had considered running for the U.S. Senate[45] but is instead running for re-election. He was opposed in the Republican primary by Michael Steinberg, a candidate for the seat in 2012.

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Pittenger 29,505 67.59%
Republican Michael Steinberg 14,146 32.41%
Totals 43,651 100%

No Democrat filed to run for the seat, making this district the only one in the state not being contested by both major parties in 2014.[2] There is a write-in campaign for candidate Shawn Eckles of Iredell County.[46][47]

District 10[edit]

The 10th district is located in central and western North Carolina and includes all of Cleveland, Gaston, Lincoln and Rutherford counties and parts of Catawba, Iredell and Buncombe counties. The incumbent is Republican Patrick McHenry, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected with 57% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+11.

McHenry had considered running for the U.S. Senate[48] but is instead running for re-election. He was opposed in the Republican primary by Richard Lynch, a candidate for the seat in 2012.[2]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry 29,400 78.04%
Republican Richard Lynch 8,273 21.96%
Totals 37,673 100%

High school social studies teacher and soccer coach Tate MacQueen ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[49] Terry Bellamy, the Mayor of Asheville and a candidate for the seat in 2012, at first said that she would seek the Democratic nomination to challenge McHenry,[50] but later changed her mind and said she would not run again.[51]

District 11[edit]

The 11th district is located in western North Carolina and includes Yancey, McDowell, Rutherford, Polk, Henderson, Buncombe, Madison, Haywood, Jackson, Transylvania, Swain, Macon, Clay, Graham and Cherokee counties. The incumbent is Republican Mark Meadows, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected with 57% of the vote in 2012, succeeding retiring Democratic incumbent Heath Shuler. The district has a PVI of R+13.

Meadows ran unopposed in the Republican primary. Two candidates ran for the Democratic nomination: physicist and candidate for the seat in 2012 Tom Hill and businessman and volunteer firefighter Keith Ruehl.[52]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Hill 16,819 54.1%
Democratic Keith Ruehl 14,272 45.9%
Totals 31,091 100%

District 12[edit]

The 12th district is located in central North Carolina and includes parts of Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Lexington, Salisbury, Concord, and High Point. Democrat Mel Watt held this seat from 1993 until he resigned on January 6, 2014 to become director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency.[53][54] The special election to fill the seat for the remainder of the current Congress will be held concurrently with the regular 2014 elections.[55] Watt was re-elected with 80% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of D+26.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

All except Patel also ran in the special election.[2]

Withdrew[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Alma
Adams
George
Battle
Marcus
Brandon
Malcolm
Graham
James
Mitchell
Curtis
Osborne
Rajive
Patel
Undecided
Hamilton Campaigns* Feb. 28–Mar. 4, 2014 500 ± 4.4% 26% 9% 4% 19% 9% 3% 1% 29%
  • * Internal poll for Alma Adams campaign

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams 15,235 44%
Democratic Malcolm Graham 8,180 23.63%
Democratic George Battle III 4,342 12.54%
Democratic Marcus Brandon 2,856 8.25%
Democratic James "Smuggie" Mitchell, Jr. 1,775 5.13%
Democratic Curtis C. Osborne 1,733 5.01%
Democratic Rajive Patel 502 1.45%
Totals 34,623 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Vince Coakley, former TV news anchor[60]
  • Leon Threatt[2]

Coakley was the only Republican to file for the special election.

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Vince Coakley 8,652 78.01%
Republican Leon Threatt 2,439 21.99%
Totals 11,091 100%

District 13[edit]

The 13th district is located in northern North Carolina and includes parts of Granville, Wake, Durham, Edgecombe, Franklin, Nash, Vance, Wayne and Wilson counties. The incumbent is Republican George Holding, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected with 57% of the vote in 2012, succeeding retiring Democratic incumbent Brad Miller. The district has a PVI of R+8.

Holding had considered running for the U.S. Senate[45] but is instead running for re-election. He was unopposed in the Republican primary.

Brenda Cleary, a registered nurse and former executive director of the North Carolina Center for Nursing;[61] Virginia Conlon;[2] and Arunava "Ron" Sanyal ran for the Democratic nomination.[2]

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brenda Cleary 24,631 70.39%
Democratic Virginia Conlon 6,308 18.03%
Democratic Arunava "Ron" Sanyal 4,052 11.58%
Totals 34,991 100%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.thegreenpapers.com/G14/NC North Carolina filing dates
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x NC State Board of Elections: Candidate filing list
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q NC State Board of Elections website
  4. ^ "Arthur Rich for Congress". Arthur Rich for Congress. March 20, 1977. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  5. ^ "News & Observer". Newsobserver.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  6. ^ House Republican Won't Run for Senate #NCSEN | At the Races
  7. ^ "News & Observer Under the Dome: Ellmers may face serious primary challenge from right next year". Projects.newsobserver.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  8. ^ "News & Observer". Newsobserver.com. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  9. ^ Daily Caller: Ellmers backs conditional amnesty, fuels primary challenger
  10. ^ Leslie, Laura. "Ellmers gets primary challenger". WRAL.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  11. ^ Catalina Camia, USA TODAY (November 3, 2013). "Clay Aiken mulling bid for Congress". Usatoday.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  12. ^ Charlotte Observer: Clay Aiken makes it official: He will run for Congress
  13. ^ "News & Observer". Newsobserver.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  14. ^ Burns, Matthew (December 19, 2013). "WRAL.com". WRAL.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  15. ^ Christensen, Rob (October 22, 2013). "News & Observer: Ellmers gets another Democratic opponent". Newsobserver.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  16. ^ Houston Barnes press release
  17. ^ a b c O'Donnell, Kelly (May 12, 2014), Clay Aiken opponent Crisco dead, NBC News, retrieved May 12, 2014 
  18. ^ Keith Crisco dies days after primary
  19. ^ Craig Jarvis (May 7, 2014), The counting continues in Aiken, Crisco race, The News & Observer, retrieved May 13, 2014 
  20. ^ Craig Jarvis (May 12, 2014), Keith Crisco remembered as 'one of North Carolina’s giants', The News & Observer, retrieved May 13, 2014 
  21. ^ a b Frank, John (October 31, 2013). "GOP 'extremist movement' prompts NC Candidate to Switch to Democrat". News & Observer. 
  22. ^ a b Allen, Mike (October 3, 2013). "Taylor Griffin running for Congress in N.C.". Politico. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Jones' likely opponent goes after him on defense". Projects.newsobserver.com. June 10, 2013. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Scott's Biography". Scott Dacey Committee. Retrieved November 3, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Army veteran to run for Congress in NC3 next year". WECT. January 25, 2013. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  26. ^ Dean, Christopher (October 31, 2013). "Hate has no home in Representation – Congressional candidate for NC3 parts company with the GOP to run on the Democratic ticket". Thigpen for Congress. 
  27. ^ Cahn, Emily (August 20, 2013). "Virginia Foxx Says No to Senate Bid in North Carolina". Roll Call. Retrieved August 20, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b State Board of Elections: 07/15/2014 OFFICIAL SECOND PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS
  29. ^ a b "Rep. Howard Coble announces retirement, will not seek re-election". MyFOX8.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  30. ^ "News & Record: Berger Jr. kicks off congressional campaign". News-record.com. November 20, 2013. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  31. ^ "News & Observer". Newsobserver.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  32. ^ "Greensboro News & Record". News-record.com. December 9, 2013. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  33. ^ Cahn, Emily. "Roll Call: Howard Coble opponents line up in North Carolina". rollcall.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  34. ^ Susan Ladd (April 23, 2014). "Hotly contested 6th Congressional races to replace Coble". Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved April 25, 2014. 
  35. ^ News & Record
  36. ^ "News & Observer Under the Dome: Top UNC official to run for Howard Coble's seat". Projects.newsobserver.com. August 12, 2013. Retrieved October 22, 2013. 
  37. ^ WRAL.com: Congressman Mike McIntyre to retire
  38. ^ "Barfield announces intention to run for McIntyre’s congressional seat". Port City Daily. February 27, 2013. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  39. ^ Princeton commissioner considering run for Congress
  40. ^ "Rouzer to run again for Congress from NC in 2014". The News & Observer. Associated Press. March 29, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013. 
  41. ^ Star-News
  42. ^ Attorney J. Wesley Casteen enters NC7 Congressional race as Libertarian candidate
  43. ^ Port City Daily
  44. ^ State Board of Elections: CERTIFIED UNAFFILIATED AND WRITE-IN CANDIDATES
  45. ^ a b Mimms, Sarah (February 13, 2013). "N.C. Labor Commissioner Considering Run Against Hagan". National Journal. Retrieved February 14, 2013. 
  46. ^ Campaign to Elect Shawn Eckles
  47. ^ State Board of Elections: CERTIFIED UNAFFILIATED AND WRITE-IN CANDIDATES
  48. ^ Cahn, Emily (April 11, 2013). "North Carolina: McHenry Won't Run Against Hagan". Roll Call. Retrieved April 11, 2013. 
  49. ^ Black Mountain News: MacQueen makes bid for Congress
  50. ^ Forbes, David (February 28, 2013). "Mayor Bellamy won't run for re-election, will run for Congress". Mountain Xpress. Retrieved March 3, 2013. 
  51. ^ Citizen-Times: Asheville Mayor Bellamy won't run for Congress
  52. ^ Blue Ridge Now/Times-News
  53. ^ Allen, Jonathan (August 6, 2013). "Democrats grow worried about Mel Watt’s confirmation odds". Politico. Retrieved October 11, 2013. 
  54. ^ Ordo, Franco (December 10, 2013). "Charlotte Observer". Charlotte Observer. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  55. ^ WRAL.com
  56. ^ a b c d e f g Cahn, Emily. "Roll Call: Watt Confirmation Kicks Off North Carolina Special Election". Atr.rollcall.com. Retrieved December 16, 2013. 
  57. ^ Dunn, Nash (January 31, 2014). "Former Lexington resident announces for 12th District". The Dispatch. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  58. ^ Jen Wilson (April 15, 2014). "James Mitchell drops bid for congressional seat". Charlotte Business Journal. Retrieved April 17, 2014. 
  59. ^ Cahn, Emily (January 6, 2014). "Election Scheduled to Replace Watt in North Carolina". Roll Call. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  60. ^ Morrill, Jim (January 28, 2014). "Ex-anchor Vince Coakley enters congressional race". The Charlotte Observer. Retrieved February 1, 2014. 
  61. ^ "News & Observer". Newsobserver.com. December 27, 2013. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 

External links[edit]