1989–90 DDR-Oberliga

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DDR-Oberliga
Season 1989–90
Champions Dynamo Dresden
Relegated BSG Wismut Aue
Fortschritt Bischofswerda
European Cup Dynamo Dresden
UEFA Cup FC Karl-Marx-Stadt
1. FC Magdeburg
Matches played 182
Goals scored 467 (2.57 per match)
Top goalscorer Torsten Gütschow (Dynamo Dresden) - 18
Biggest home win 6–1 (Dynamo Dresden v. FC Berlin)
Biggest away win 5–0 (1. FC Magdeburg v. HFC Chemie)
Highest scoring Dynamo Dresden (47)
Highest attendance 32,867 (Dynamo Dresden v. Lok Leipzig)
Lowest attendance 1,400 (three matches)
Average attendance 8,303

The 1989–90 DDR-Oberliga was the 41st season of the DDR-Oberliga, the first tier of league football in East Germany. It was the last season of the league under the name of DDR-Oberliga as it played as the NOFV-Oberliga in the following season. East Germany saw great political change during the 1989–90 season with the opening of borders in October 1989, free elections in March 1990 and the eventual German reunification later in the year.

The league was contested by fourteen teams. Dynamo Dresden won the championship, the club's last out of eight East German championships.[1][2]

Torsten Gütschow of Dynamo Dresden was the league's top scorer with 18 goals,[3] while Ulf Kirsten, also of Dynamo Dresden, took out the seasons East German Footballer of the year award.[4]

On the strength of the 1989–90 title Dynamo Dresden qualified for the 1990–91 European Cup where the club was knocked out by Red Star Belgrade in the quarter finals. Second-placed FC Karl-Marx-Stadt qualified for the 1990–91 UEFA Cup where it was knocked out by Borussia Dortmund in the first round while third-placed 1. FC Magdeburg lost to Girondins de Bordeaux in the second round. With Dynamo Dresden having won the double the losing cup finalist, Dynamo Schwerin, playing in the tier two DDR-Liga, took part in the 1990–91 European Cup Winners' Cup where it was knocked out in the first round by FK Austria Wien.[5]

During the season Berliner FC Dynamo was renamed to FC Berlin, BSG Wismut Aue was renamed to FC Wismut Aue and BSG Stahl Eisenhüttenstadt became Eisenhüttenstädter FC Stahl while further name changes followed in the off-season.[6] As another sign of the changes in East Germany players were, for the first time, allowed to transfer to western clubs during the 1989–90 seasons. Andreas Thom was the first, leaving BFC Dynamo for Bayer 04 Leverkusen in February 1990, followed by others which, while financially lucrative, left DDR-Oberliga clubs like Dynamo weakened.[7]

Table[edit]

The 1989–90 season saw two newly promoted clubs, Eisenhüttenstädter FC Stahl and BSG Fortschritt Bischofswerda.[6][8]

DDR-Fußball-Oberliga 1990.jpg
Pos Club P W D L GF GA GD Pts
1 Dynamo Dresden 26 12 12 2 47 26 +21 36
2 FC Karl-Marx-Stadt 26 13 10 3 35 20 +15 36
3 1. FC Magdeburg 26 13 8 5 39 22 +17 34
4 FC Berlin 26 9 12 5 38 35 +3 30
5 FC Carl Zeiss Jena 26 11 8 7 29 27 +2 30
6 F.C. Hansa Rostock 26 9 9 8 38 33 +5 27
7 FC Energie Cottbus 26 10 7 9 36 37 -1 27
8 1. FC Lokomotive Leipzig 26 9 7 10 34 33 +1 25
9 Hallescher FC Chemie 26 8 8 10 38 38 0 24
10 Stahl Brandenburg 26 6 12 8 35 37 -2 24
11 FC Rot-Weiss Erfurt 26 5 9 12 29 40 -11 19
12 FC Stahl Eisenhüttenstadt 26 2 14 10 22 31 -9 18
13 FC Wismut Aue 26 5 8 13 25 36 -11 18
14 Fortschritt Bischofswerda 26 7 2 17 22 52 -30 16

Key[edit]

Champions
UEFA Cup qualification
Relegation to DDR-Liga

Results[edit]

1989/1990 SGD FCK FCM FCB CZJ ROS EGC LOK HFC BSB RWE EFC AUE FBW
1. SG Dynamo Dresden 2:0 3:1 6:1 0:4 1:1 3:0 3:1 2:0 3:2 3:1 2:1 3:0 3:0
2. FC Karl-Marx-Stadt 1:1 1:0 0:0 3:0 1:0 3:1 2:1 4:0 3:0 2:0 1:0 1:0 2:1
3. 1. FC Magdeburg 1:1 1:1 3:1 0:2 2:1 4:1 2:2 3:1 1:1 1:0 2:1 1:0 4:0
4. FC Berlin 1:1 0:0 2:1 2:0 3:0 1:1 1:3 3:1 5:1 2:2 0:0 1:4 1:0
5. FC Carl Zeiss Jena 1:1 1:1 0:2 1:1 2:1 1:0 0:0 2:0 2:2 1:0 1:1 1:0 1:0
6. FC Hansa Rostock 0:0 2:2 0:0 3:1 0:1 3:0 3:3 2:1 1:0 4:1 1:0 2:1 1:2
7. BSG Energie Cottbus 0:0 0:0 2:0 2:2 1:0 3:1 1:0 1:1 3:1 4:2 3:1 2:1 3:0
8. 1. FC Lokomotive Leipzig 1:1 1:2 1:2 1:2 1:0 2:2 2:0 1:0 0:1 2:1 2:0 2:1 3:1
9. Hallescher FC Chemie 2:2 4:0 0:5 1:2 1:1 1:1 3:0 1:0 1:3 3:0 2:2 3:1 4:0
10. BSG Stahl Brandenburg 2:2 2:2 0:1 1:1 4:0 1:1 2:0 1:1 1:1 1:1 0:0 4:2 0:2
11. FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt 2:0 1:0 1:1 1:3 4:1 0:1 2:2 2:0 1:1 0:0 0:0 1:1 3:0
12. Eisenhüttenstädter FC Stahl 2:2 0:0 0:0 1:1 1:2 1:1 1:1 2:2 0:1 3:1 2:2 0:0 2:0
13. FC Wismut Aue 1:1 1:1 0:0 0:0 0:0 3:2 2:1 0:1 1:1 0:3 3:0 2:1 1:3
14. BSG Fortschritt Bischofswerda 0:1 1:2 0:1 1:1 1:4 1:4 1:4 2:1 0:4 1:1 2:1 2:0 1:0

Top goalscorers[edit]

The seasons top scorers:[9]

Player Club Goals
1. Torsten Gütschow SG Dynamo Dresden 18
2. Steffen Heidrich FC Karl-Marx-Stadt 12
3. Uwe Rösler 1. FC Magdeburg 11
Markus Wuckel 1. FC Magdeburg 11
5. Ulf Kirsten SG Dynamo Dresden 10
Matthias Sammer SG Dynamo Dresden 10
Petrik Sander BSG Energie Cottbus 10

Championship-winning squad[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
East Germany GK Thomas Köhler
East Germany GK Frank Schulze
East Germany GK Ronny Teuber
East Germany DF Steffen Büttner
East Germany DF Andreas Diebitz
East Germany DF Mario Kern
East Germany DF Uwe Kirchner
East Germany DF Frank Lieberam
East Germany DF Detlef Schößler
East Germany DF Andreas Trautmann
East Germany DF Andreas Wagenhaus
East Germany MF Matthias Döschner
No. Position Player
East Germany MF Ralf Hauptmann
East Germany MF Uwe Jähnig
East Germany MF Sven Kmetsch
East Germany MF Matthias Maucksch
East Germany MF Hans-Uwe Pilz
East Germany MF Sven Ratke
East Germany MF Matthias Sammer
East Germany MF Jörg Stübner
East Germany FW Torsten Gütschow
East Germany FW Ulf Kirsten
East Germany FW Rocco Milde
East Germany FW Ralf Minge

References[edit]

  1. ^ "East Germany - List of Champions". rsssf.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "DDR-Meister" [East German champions]. dfb.de (in German). German Football Association. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  3. ^ "DDDR » Oberliga » Torschützenkönige" [DDR-Oberliga top scorers]. Weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 25 January 2016. 
  4. ^ fuwo, page: 92
  5. ^ "European Competitions 1990–91". rsssf.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  6. ^ a b "East Germany 1946-1990". rsssf.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  7. ^ fuwo, page: 33
  8. ^ "DDR-Oberliga 1989–90". Weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  9. ^ "DDR » Oberliga 1989/1990 » Torschützenliste" [DDR-Oberliga 1989–90 top scorers]. Weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 26 January 2016. 

Sources[edit]

  • "Das war unser Fußball im Osten" [This was our football in the East]. Fußball-Woche (fuwo) (in German) (Berlin: Axel-Springer-Verlag). 1991. 

External links[edit]