913

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
913 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar913
CMXIII
Ab urbe condita1666
Armenian calendar362
ԹՎ ՅԿԲ
Assyrian calendar5663
Balinese saka calendar834–835
Bengali calendar320
Berber calendar1863
Buddhist calendar1457
Burmese calendar275
Byzantine calendar6421–6422
Chinese calendar壬申(Water Monkey)
3609 or 3549
    — to —
癸酉年 (Water Rooster)
3610 or 3550
Coptic calendar629–630
Discordian calendar2079
Ethiopian calendar905–906
Hebrew calendar4673–4674
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat969–970
 - Shaka Samvat834–835
 - Kali Yuga4013–4014
Holocene calendar10913
Iranian calendar291–292
Islamic calendar300–301
Japanese calendarEngi 13
(延喜13年)
Javanese calendar812–813
Julian calendar913
CMXIII
Korean calendar3246
Minguo calendar999 before ROC
民前999年
Nanakshahi calendar−555
Seleucid era1224/1225 AG
Thai solar calendar1455–1456
Tibetan calendar阳水猴年
(male Water-Monkey)
1039 or 658 or −114
    — to —
阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1040 or 659 or −113
Empress Zoe and Constantine VII

Year 913 (CMXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

  • Caliph Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah of the Fatimid Caliphate replaces the unpopular governor Ibn Abi Khinzir with Ali ibn Umar al-Balawi. But the Sicilian lords find this unacceptable and decide to declare independence of Sicily. They acknowledge allegiance to the Abbasid caliph Al-Muqtadir and acclaim an Aghlabid prince, Ahmed ibn Khorob, as emir of Sicily. The Sicilians re-launch their conquest of Byzantine Calabria, while Ahmed ibn Khorob in Sicily leads a successful assault against the North African cities of Sfax and Tripoli.[7]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Angelov et al 1981, p. 285.
  2. ^ Zlatarski 1972, p. 358.
  3. ^ PmbZ, Konstantinos Duka (#23817).
  4. ^ Runciman 1988, p. 50.
  5. ^ Polemis 1968, p. 24.
  6. ^ Bóna, István (2000). The Hungarians and Europa in the 9th-10th centuries. Budapest: Historia - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, pp. 13–14. ISBN 963-8312-67-X.
  7. ^ Bresc, Henri (2003). "La Sicile et l'espace libyen au Moyen Age" (PDF). Retrieved 17 January 2012.