910s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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Events[edit]

910

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

911[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


912[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

913[edit]


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
  • Caliph Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah of the Fatimid Caliphate replaces the unpopular governor Ibn Abi Khinzir with Ali ibn Umar al-Balawi. But the Sicilian lords find this unacceptable and decide to declare independence of Sicily. They acknowledge allegiance to the Abbasid caliph Al-Muqtadir and acclaim an Aghlabid prince, Ahmed ibn Khorob, as emir of Sicily. The Sicilians re-launch their conquest of Byzantine Calabria, while Ahmed ibn Khorob in Sicily leads a successful assault against the North African cities of Sfax and Tripoli.[14]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


914[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Africa[edit]
  • January 24 – The Fatimid general, Hubāsa of the Kutama Berber tribe, marches out with his troops from Tripoli. He follows the coastline, and takes possession of the only two towns of any size Syrte and Ajdābiya, without a struggle. The garrisons of the two towns—the westernmost outposts of the Abbasid Caliphate—have already fled.[23]
  • February 6 – Hubāsa takes Barqah (modern-day Benghazi), the ancient capital of Cyrenaica, the Abbasid governor withdraws to Egypt, before the superior strength of the Fatimids. With this rich, fertile province fallen into in his hands, it provides 24,000 dinars in annual revenues from taxes, as well as 15,000 dinars paid by Christians.[23]
  • July 11Al-Qa'im bi-Amr Allah, son of the Fatimid caliph Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah, leaves Raqqada at the head of a army, which is composed of Kutama warriors and the Arab jund (personal guard) in an attempt to conquer Egypt. He send orders to Hubāsa to wait for him, but driven by ambition he is already on his way to Alexandria.[23]
  • August 27 – Hubāsa captures Alexandria, after an victorious encounter with Egyptian troops near Al-Hanniyya (modern-day El Alamein). The Abbasid governor Tekin refuses to surrender and asks for reinforcements, which reach him in September. Shortly after Al-Qa'im bi-Amr Allah enters Alexandria, with the rest of his army.[23]
  • December – The Fatimid army under Hubāsa leaves Alexandria, followed by Al-Qa'im bi-Amr Allah. The Abbassid troops hold Fustat and begin a counter-offensive against the invaders. Kutama cavalry suffers heavy losses to the Turkish archers.[23]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


915[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]


916[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
  • Sicilian Berbers in Agrigento revolt and depose the independent Emir Ahmed ibn Khorob. They offer Sicily to the Fatimid Caliphate in Ifriqiya (modern Tunisia). Caliph Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah welcomes the turn of this event, but refuses to grant the Berber rulers their autonomy. He sends a Fatimid expeditionary force under Abu Said Musa which lands in Sicily and, with some difficulty, takes control of the island. Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah appoints Salam ibn Rashid as the emir of Sicily. Ahmed ibn Khorob is dispatched to Raqqada and executed.[28]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • Abaoji, Khitan ruler and founder of the Liao Dynasty, adopts Chinese court formalities in which he declares himself emperor in the Chinese style and adopts an era name, Taizu of Liao. He names his eldest son Yelü Bei as heir apparent, a first in the history of the Khitan. Abaoji leads an campaign in the west, conquering much of the Mongolian Plains.[30]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


917[edit]


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
  • August 20Battle of Achelous: A Byzantine expeditionary force (62,000 men) under General Leo Phokas (the Elder) is routed by the Bulgarians at the Achelous River near the fortress of Anchialos (modern Pomorie) on the Black Sea coast. Phokas flees to Mesembria (modern Nesebar) and escapes by boarding a ship. Tsar Simeon I (the Great) becomes de facto ruler of the whole Balkan Peninsula, except the well-protected Byzantine capital of Constantinople and the Peloponnese.[31]
  • Fall – Battle of Katasyrtai: The Bulgarian army under Simeon I marching southwards to Constantinople. Leo Phokas, who survived at Anchelous, gathers the last Byzantine troops to intercept the Bulgarians before reaching the capital. The two armies meet near the village of Katasyrtai, just outside Constantinople, after a surprise night attack, the Byzantines are completely routed from the battlefield.[32]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]


918[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]


919[edit]


By Place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Africa[edit]
China[edit]
Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

910

911

912

913

914

915

916

917

918

919

Deaths[edit]

910

911

912

913

914

915

916

917

918

919


References[edit]

  1. ^ Györffy György: A magyarok elődeiről és a honfoglalásról; Osiris Kiadó, Budapest, 2002, p. 214.
  2. ^ John Haywood (1995). Historical Atlas of the Vikings, p. 80. Penguin Books: ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8.
  3. ^ Meynier, Gilbert (2010). L'Algérie, cœur du Maghreb classique: De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte. p. 38. 
  4. ^ Ostrogorsky (1969), p. 261.
  5. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9. 
  6. ^ Yorke. Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England, p. 123.
  7. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique. Paris: Seuil. p. 87. ISBN 2-02-012935-3. 
  8. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 39.
  9. ^ Angelov et al 1981, p. 285.
  10. ^ Zlatarski 1972, p. 358.
  11. ^ PmbZ, Konstantinos Duka (#23817).
  12. ^ Runciman 1988, p. 50.
  13. ^ Polemis 1968, p. 24.
  14. ^ Bresc, Henri (2003). "La Sicile et l'espace libyen au Moyen Age" (PDF). Retrieved 17 January 2012. 
  15. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 148. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  16. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 148–149. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  17. ^ Ch Paquis, Louis Dochez Histoire d'Espagne Béthune et Plon, 1844.
  18. ^ John Haywood (1995). Historical Atlas of the Vikings, p. 74. ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8.
  19. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique. Paris: Seuil. p. 85. ISBN 2-02-012935-3. 
  20. ^ Picard, C. (2000) Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle). L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose; pp.54.
  21. ^ Timeline of the Early British Kingdoms 599 AD–937 AD - Britannia.com.
  22. ^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, ed. M. Swanton (Dent, London 1997), s.a. 911–918.
  23. ^ a b c d e Heinz Halm The empire of the Mahdi, Partie 1, Volume 26 BRILL, 1996. ISBN 978-90-04-10056-5.
  24. ^ Joel L. Kraemer Philosophy in the renaissance of Islam: Abū Sulaymān Al-Sijistānī and his circle Brill Archive, 1986. ISBN 978-90-04-07258-9.
  25. ^ Rayfield, Donald (2000). The Literature of Georgia: A History, pp. 48-49. Routledge. ISBN 0-7007-1163-5.
  26. ^ Ancient India Par R.C. Majumdar Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1994. ISBN 978-81-208-0436-4.
  27. ^ Peter Partner (1 Jan 1972). The Lands of St. Peter: The Papal State in the Middle Ages and the Early Renaissance (illustrated ed.). University of California Press. pp. 81–82. ISBN 9780520021815. 
  28. ^ Italian History: Timeline - Lombard Leagues Board history-timeline?page=10.
  29. ^ Charles-Edwards, T. M. (2013). Wales and the Britons 350–1064. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. p. 505. ISBN 978-0-19-821731-2. 
  30. ^ Mote 2003, pp. 42–43.
  31. ^ Brain Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare 527–1071, pp. 78–81. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1.
  32. ^ Lynda Garland (April 1, 2002). Byzantine Empresses: Woman and Power in Byzantium AD 527-1204. Routledge. p. 122. 
  33. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 150. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  34. ^ Walker, Ian W (2000). Mercia and the Making of England Sutton. ISBN 0-7509-2131-5.
  35. ^ John Haywood (1995). Historical Atlas of the Vikings, p. 68. ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8.
  36. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp. 38.
  37. ^ Taddesse Tamrat, Church and State in Ethiopia, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972), p. 56.