Ashville, Alabama

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Ashville, Alabama
City
Location of Ashville in St. Clair County, Alabama.
Location of Ashville in St. Clair County, Alabama.
Coordinates: 33°50′13″N 86°15′18″W / 33.837°N 86.255°W / 33.837; -86.255Coordinates: 33°50′13″N 86°15′18″W / 33.837°N 86.255°W / 33.837; -86.255
Country United States
State Alabama
County St. Clair
Government
 • Mayor Derrick Mostella
Area[1]
 • Total 19.40 sq mi (50.25 km2)
 • Land 19.21 sq mi (49.76 km2)
 • Water 0.19 sq mi (0.49 km2)
Elevation 577 ft (176 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 2,212
 • Estimate (2016)[2] 2,275
 • Density 117.26/sq mi (45.27/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 35953
Area code(s) 205
FIPS code 01-02908
GNIS feature ID 0164539
Website City website

Ashville is a city[3] in St. Clair County, Alabama, United States. Its population was 2,212 at the 2010 census, down from 2,260, at which time it was a town. Ashville is the county seat of St. Clair County[4] along with Pell City. It incorporated in 1822.[5]

Geography[edit]

Ashville is located at 33°50′37″N 86°15′59″W / 33.84361°N 86.26639°W / 33.84361; -86.26639 (33.843737, -86.266274).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 19.4 square miles (50 km2), of which 19.3 square miles (50 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.46%) is water.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Ashville has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [7]

Climate data for Ashville, Alabama
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 13
(55)
13
(55)
19
(66)
23
(73)
28
(83)
32
(89)
32
(90)
32
(90)
30
(86)
24
(76)
18
(64)
12
(53)
23
(73)
Average low °C (°F) 1
(33)
1
(33)
6
(43)
9
(48)
13
(56)
18
(65)
20
(68)
19
(67)
16
(60)
9
(49)
3
(38)
1
(33)
9
(49)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 135
(5.3)
137
(5.4)
163
(6.4)
117
(4.6)
91
(3.6)
94
(3.7)
130
(5)
99
(3.9)
91
(3.6)
66
(2.6)
86
(3.4)
130
(5.1)
1,334
(52.5)
Source: Weatherbase [8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 117
1900 362
1910 278 −23.2%
1920 349 25.5%
1930 369 5.7%
1940 385 4.3%
1950 494 28.3%
1960 973 97.0%
1970 986 1.3%
1980 1,489 51.0%
1990 1,494 0.3%
2000 2,260 51.3%
2010 2,212 −2.1%
Est. 2016 2,275 [2] 2.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
2013 Estimate[10]

2000 Census data[edit]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 2,260 people, 814 households, and 608 families residing in the town. The population density was 116.9 people per square mile (45.1/km2). There were 905 housing units at an average density of 46.8 per square mile (18.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 69.42% White, 26.55% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.31% Pacific Islander, 1.81% from other races, and 1.55% from two or more races. 2.88% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 814 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.2% were non-families. 22.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the town the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 102.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $31,509, and the median income for a family was $38,355. Males had a median income of $31,081 versus $21,914 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,867. About 11.4% of families and 15.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.1% of those under age 18 and 18.3% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2010, there were 2,212 people, 793 households, and 597 families residing in the town. The population density was 114.6 people per square mile (40.1/km2). There were 888 housing units at an average density of 46.0 per square mile (17.7/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 75.8% White, 20.3% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American, 03% Asian, 0% Pacific Islander, 1.4% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. 3.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 793 households out of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the town the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 10.0% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.3 years. For every 100 females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $33,321, and the median income for a family was $34,607. Males had a median income of $32,026 versus $30,033 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,419. About 14.2% of families and 19.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.0% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

April 27, 2011 Tornado[edit]

On the eve of April 27, 2011, an EF-4 tornado ripped through the Shoal Creek Valley community of Ashville, killing 13 residents. The tornado also destroyed hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of property including homes, livestock, timberland, and farm equipment. Rescuers from neighboring communities immediately responded after the twister swept through the valley; however, due to the abundance of fallen timber blocking the roads and the remoteness of the community, many victims were forced to wait hours before aid could arrive. Following the devastation, Governor Robert Bentley visited the community along with officials from the Alabama Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The community received both federal and state disaster aid for several weeks following the destructive tornado. With numerous families in the community left without homes, they were forced to seek shelter in hotels and homes of family members. Local police instituted a curfew as well as various home protection policies to insure that what property was left was taken care of.

Education[edit]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jun 22, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  3. ^ U.S.Census change list Archived August 6, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  5. ^ http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-2562
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Climate Summary for Ashville, Alabama
  8. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013.  Retrieved on November 2, 2013.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 6, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved June 3, 2014. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2015-08-09. 

External links[edit]