City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck)

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City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck)
Old Town Nature Coast Trail SP Suwannee south02.jpg
Suwannee River, looking in the direction of the City of Hawkinsville
City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck) is located in Florida
City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck)
City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck) is located in the US
City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck)
Location Dixie County, Florida, USA
Nearest city Old Town, Florida
Coordinates 29°36′26″N 82°58′15″W / 29.60722°N 82.97083°W / 29.60722; -82.97083Coordinates: 29°36′26″N 82°58′15″W / 29.60722°N 82.97083°W / 29.60722; -82.97083
Area less than one acre
Architectural style Other, 19th-century paddlewheel steamboat
NRHP Reference # 01000533[1]
FUAP # 3
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 31, 2001
Designated FUAP 1992

The City of Hawkinsville was a paddle steamer constructed in Georgia in 1886. Sold in 1900 to a Tampa, Florida company, it delivered cargo and lumber along the Suwannee River. Eventually rendered obsolete by the advent of railroads in the region, it was abandoned in the middle of the Suwannee in 1922.

It became the third Florida Underwater Archaeological Preserve when it opened to the public in 1992. This was followed on May 31, 2001 by its addition to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places as City of Hawkinsville (shipwreck).[2] It is located in Dixie County, 100 yards south of the Old Town railroad trestle (which is part of the Nature Coast State Trail).

History[edit]

Georgia[edit]

In 1886, the Hawkinsville (Georgia) Deepwater Boat Lines had the wooden-hulled City of Hawkinsville built for them in Abbeville, Georgia.

After 14 years of service, they sold it to the Gulf Transportation Company of Tampa.

Florida[edit]

The largest (141 feet long by 30 feet wide) steamboat stationed on the Suwannee, The City of Hawkinsville transported lumber and supplies from Branford to Cedar Key for the next two decades. Some of the supplies would include construction materials for the railroads that would end the need for the steamboat itself.

In 1922, the steamboat was abandoned in the Suwanee near what is now the railroad trestle built across the river, reducing the need for a boat to cross the river at that point. It still resides at this location, preserved as one of the Florida Underwater Archaeological Preserves.[3]

Today[edit]

The wreck of the steamboat has become part of the river's ecosystem, and was added to the Florida Underwater Archaeological Preserve system in 1992. Most of it is remarkably intact, and rests on a ledge in the middle of the Suwannee, able to be seen from the river's surface. However, diving is only allowed for those with advanced open water certification, and venturing within the wreck itself is not permitted.

Admission and hours[edit]

There is no entrance fee to view the City of Hawkinsville above or below the water, and it is open year-round .

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  3. ^ "City of Hawkinsville Preserve — Suwannee River, Florida". Explore Southern History. Retrieved June 16, 2012. 

External links[edit]