Daniel McFadden

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Daniel McFadden
McFadden.jpg
Born (1937-07-29) July 29, 1937 (age 81)
NationalityUnited States
Alma materUniversity of Minnesota
Known forDiscrete choice
AwardsJohn Bates Clark Medal (1975)
Frisch Medal (1986)
Erwin Plein Nemmers Prize in Economics (2000)
Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2000)
Scientific career
FieldsEconometrics
InstitutionsUniversity of California, Berkeley, MIT, University of Southern California
Doctoral advisorLeonid Hurwicz
Doctoral studentsWalter Erwin Diewert
Hal Varian
John Rust
Axel Börsch-Supan
Vassilis Hajivassiliou
Jonathan Feinstein
Hidehiko Ichimura [ja]

Daniel Little McFadden (born July 29, 1937) is an American econometrician who shared the 2000 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with James Heckman. McFadden's share of the prize was "for his development of theory and methods for analyzing discrete choice".[1] He is the Presidential Professor of Health Economics at the University of Southern California and Professor of the Graduate School at University of California, Berkeley.

McFadden was born in Raleigh, North Carolina. He attended the University of Minnesota, where he received a B.S. in Physics, and a Ph.D. in Behavioral Science (Economics) five years later (1962). While at the University of Minnesota, his graduate advisor was Leonid Hurwicz, who was awarded the Economics Nobel Prize in 2007.[2]

In 1964 McFadden joined the faculty of UC Berkeley, focusing his research on choice behavior and the problem of linking economic theory and measurement. In 1974 he introduced Conditional logit analysis.[3]

In 1975 McFadden won the John Bates Clark Medal. In 1977 he moved to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1981 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He returned to Berkeley in 1991, founding the Econometrics Laboratory, which is devoted to statistical computation for economics applications. He remains its director. He is a trustee of the Economists for Peace and Security. In 2000 he won the Erwin Plein Nemmers Prize in Economics.

In January 2011 McFadden was appointed the Presidential Professor of Health Economics at the University of Southern California (USC), which entails a joint appointment in the Department of Economics and the Price School of Public Policy.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2000". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  2. ^ "All Laureates in Economics". Nobelprize.org. 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  3. ^ Conditional Logic Analysis of Qualitative Choice Behavior
  4. ^ "Nobel Winner, Dr. McFadden, Appointed Presidential Professor at USC". usc.edu. Archived from the original on 2011-01-15. Retrieved 2011-01-10.

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Robert A. Mundell
Laureate of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics
2000
Served alongside: James J. Heckman
Succeeded by
George A. Akerlof
A. Michael Spence
Joseph E. Stiglitz
Academic offices
Preceded by
Martin Feldstein
President of the American Economic Association
2005– 2006
Succeeded by
George Akerlof