Roman Catholic Diocese of Saint-Brieuc

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Diocese of Saint-Brieuc and Tréguier
Dioecesis Briocensis et Trecorensis
Diocèse de Saint-Brieuc et Tréguier
Saint-Brieuc (22) Cathédrale 01.JPG
Location
Country  France
Ecclesiastical province Rennes
Metropolitan Archdiocese of Rennes, Dol, and Saint-Malo
Statistics
Area 6,867 km2 (2,651 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2014)
591,641
582,000 (98.4%)
Parishes 58
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Sui iuris church Latin Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 5th Century (As Diocese of Saint-Brieuc)
23 January 1852 (As Diocese of Saint-Brieuc - Tréguier
Cathedral Cathedral Basilica of St. Stephen in Saint-Brieuc
Patron saint Saint Brioc
Saint William Pinchon
Secular priests 165 (diocesan)
8 (religious orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Denis Moutel
Metropolitan Archbishop Pierre d'Ornellas
Emeritus Bishops Lucien Fruchaud Bishop Emeritus (1992-2010)
Website
http://saintbrieuc-treguier.catholique.fr/?lang=fr

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saint-Brieuc and Tréguier (Latin: Dioecesis Briocensis et Trecorensis; French: Diocèse de Saint-Brieuc et Tréguier) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. The diocese comprises the department of Côtes d'Armor in the Region of Brittany. The diocese is currently suffragan to the Archdiocese of Rennes, Dol, and Saint-Malo. The current bishop is Denis Moutel, appointed in 2010.

Originally erected according to legend in the 5th century, the diocese was suppressed by the French Revolution. Re-established by the Concordat of 1802, the diocese became a suffragan to the Archdiocese of Tours. Later, in 1850, it became suffragan of the Archdiocese of Rennes. The Diocese of Saint-Brieuc was formed to include: (1) the ancient diocese of the same name; (2) the greater portion of the Diocese of Tréguier; (3) a part of the old Dioceses of St. Malo, Dol, and Quimper and Léon, and the (4) parishes of the Diocese of Vannes. In 1852 the Bishops of Saint-Brieuc were authorized to add to their title that of the ancient See of Tréguier.

History[edit]

A Welsh[1] saint, Brioc(us) (Brieuc), who died at the beginning of the sixth century founded in honour of St. Stephen a monastery which afterwards bore his name, and from which sprang the town of Saint-Brieuc. Brieuc's life makes no mention of him being a bishop.[2] An inscription later than the ninth century on his tomb, at Saint-Serge at Angers, where his alleged body was transported in the 850s,[3] mentions him as the first Bishop of Saint-Brieuc. His alleged remains at Saint-Serge were moved to a different tomb in 1166, in the presence of King Henry II of England.[4] His remains were carried back to Saint-Brieuc in 1210.[5]

It was King Nomenoe who, about the middle of the ninth century, is said to have made the monastery the seat of a bishop. Barthélemy Hauréau, however, begins his series of bishops in Gallia christiana with Bishop Adam (ca. 1032).[6]

Among the Bishops of Saint-Brieuc, the following are mentioned: St. Guillaume Pinchon (1220–34), who protected the rights of the episcopate against Pierre Mauclerc, Duke of Brittany, and was forced to go into exile for some time at Poitiers; Jean du Tillet (1553–64), later Bishop of Meaux; Denis de La Barde[7] (1641–75); and Jean-Baptiste de Caffarelli du Falga (1802-15).

The principal pilgrimages in the Diocese of Saint-Brieuc are: Notre-Dame de Bon Secours at Guingamp, the sanctuary of which was enriched by the munificence of the Dukes of Brittany; Notre Dame d'Espérance, at Saint-Brieuc, a pilgrimage dating from 1848; Notre Dame de La Fontaine at Saint-Brieuc, dating from the establishment of an oratory by Saint-Brieuc, and revived in 1893 to encourage devotion to that Saint; Notre Dame de Guyaudet, near St-Nicholas du Pélem; and Notre Dame de LaRonce, at Rostrenen, a church raised to the status of a Collegiate Church by Sixtus IV in 1483.

At the end of the eighteenth century, on the eve of the French Revolution, the Cathedral had a Chapter[8] composed of six Dignities: the Dean, the Treasurer, the Archdeacon of Penthièvre, the Archdeacon of Goëlo, the Scholastic, and the Cantor; there were twenty prebends. The first prebend always belonged to the Duc de Penthièvre. There were 113 parish churches, 13 chapels in small villages, 4 Collegiate Churches (one just outside the walls of Saint-Brieuc dedicated to Guillaume Pinchon, the martyr bishop) and four abbeys of male monks.[9]

During the French revolution the Diocese of Saint-Brieuc was abolished and subsumed into a new diocese, coterminous with the new 'Departement des Côtes-du-Nord', and a suffragan of the 'Metropole du Nord-Ouest' at Rennes.[10] The clergy were required to swear and oath to the Constitution, and under the terms of the Civil Constitution of the Clergy a new bishop was to be elected by all the voters of the departement. This placed them in schism with the Roman Catholic Church and the Pope. The electors chose Father Jean-Marie Jacob, the curé of Lannebert, as their new Constitutional Bishop. He was consecrated in Nôtre-Dame in Paris by Constitutional Bishop Gobel on 1 May 1791. Gobel, a legitimate bishop, consecrated in 1772, had apostasized and was then Constitutional Bishop of Paris.[11] The legitimate Bishop Bellecize had fled his diocese, leaving its administration in the hands of his vicars-general.[12] 1n 1795 and 1796 Bishop Jacob was part of the movement seeking an accommodation with Rome. He faced great difficulties both from the flight of many of his clergy in the face of the Terror, and from the seizure of large areas of the countryside by the Chouans, who were loyal to the monarchy.[13] Jacob fell ill during a trip to Paris and died there on 28 May 1801. An election was being prepared to elect his successor, when First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte ordered all the Constitutional Bishops to resign. He was striking a Concordat with Pope Pius VII, which included the liquidation of the Constitutional Church.

Bishops of Saint-Brieuc[edit]

to 1200[edit]

  • Felix, or Garnobrius (in 859)[14]
  • Adam (attested in 1032)[15]
  • Haemon (c. 1075 – 1088)[16]
  • Guillaume[17]
  • Jean (1109–1133)[18]
  • Rolland (ca. 1144 – 1147)
  • Geoffroy (subscribed a document in 1149)[19]
  • Joscius (ca. 1150 – 1157): promoted to Tours.[20]
  • Judicael (d. 1161)[21]
  • Goffridus (c. 1164 – 1202)[22]

1200–1400[edit]

  • Joscelin (c. 1201, 1206)[23]
  • Guillaume (c. 1206 – 1208)[24]
  • Pierre (1208 – c. 1212)[25]
  • Sylvester (c. 1213 – 1220)[26]
  • Guillaume Pinchon[27] (1220 – 29 July 1234)
  • Philippe[28] ( 1235 – 1248)
  • André ( ca. 1251 – after 1255)[29]
  • Raoul ( 23 February 1257 – 1259 or 1260)[30]
  • Simon ( 1260 – 1271)[31]
  • Pierre de Vannes ( 29 May 1273 – after 1290)[32]
  • Geoffroy ( by 1295 – 1312)[33]
  • Alain ( 8 January 1313 – 1320)
  • Jean d'Avaugour ( 15 February 1320 – 1328): transferred to Dol 27 April 1328[34]
  • Mathieu Ferrandi ( 13 July 1328 – 1328) resigned
  • Radulfus d'Escar (de la Fleche) ( 23 January 1329 – 17 March 1335).
  • Gui de Montfort (1335 – 1357)
  • Hugues de Montelais ( 21 August 1357 – 1375) promoted to the Cardinalate on 20 December 1375[35]
  • Laurent de la Faye ( 2 January 1376 – 6 August 1379) transferred to Avranches)[36]
  • Guillaume Beschard ( 6 August 1379 – 1385) (Avignon Obedience)
  • Guillaume Auger[37] ( 7 June 1385 – 22 March 1404) (Avignon Obedience)

1400 to 1600[edit]

  • Jean de Malestroit [Châteaugiron] ( 2 May 1404 – 1419: transferred to Nantes on 17 July 1419)[38]
  • Guillaume Eder ( 15 March 1428 – 1431, died)
  • Hervé Huguet de Boiscrobin ( 29 January 1432 – 1436)
  • Olivier de Tillet[39] ( 4 July 1436 – end of 1438)
  • Jean Privent ( 27 February 1439 – 25 April 1450: Appointed Bishop of Saint-Malo)[40]
  • Jean L'Espervier[41] ( 1439 Appointed - 15 July 1450: Appointed Bishop of Saint-Malo)
  • Jacques Pregent [Pencoel] ( 15 July 1450 – 1471)[42]
  • Pierre de Montfort de Laval ( 19 February 1472 – 8 October 1473)[43]
  • Christophe de Penmarc'h ( 14 January 1478 – 17 December 1505)[44]
  • Olivier du Châtel ( 9 March 1506 – 16 May 1525)[45]
  • Jean de Rieux ( 6 September 1525 – 1545)[46]
  • François de Mauny ( 8 June 1545 – 13 September 1553)[47]
  • Jean du Tillet (Appointed 18 September 1553 – 5 August 1564)[48]
  • Nicolas Lancelier (5 August 1564 – 1595)[49]

1600 to 1800[edit]

  • Melchior Marconnai (19 November 1601 – 7 March 1608)[50]
  • Andreas le Porc de la Porte (3 September 1618 – 22 June 1631)[51]
  • Etienne de Virazel (10 November 1631 Appointed - 1 June 1641 Died)[52]
  • Denis de la Barde (26 May 1642 – 22 May 1675)[53]
  • Hardouin Fortin de la Hoguette (23 March 1676 - 2 February 1680)[54]
  • Louis-Marcel de Coëtlogon-Méjusseaume (1 September 1681 - 11 April 1705)[55]
  • Louis Frétat de Boissieu (7 September 1705 Appointed - 30 October 1720 Died)[56]
  • Pierre Guillaume de La Vieuxville-Pourpris[57] (28 May 1721 - 13 September 1727 Died)
  • Louis-François de Vivet de Montclus (20 October 1727 Appointed - 13 September 1744)[58]
  • Hervé-Nicolas Thépault de Brignou (1744 Appointed - 26 January 1766 Died)[59]
  • François Bareau de Girac (31 August 1766 Ordained Bishop - 1769)[60]
  • Jules-Basile Ferron de La Ferronnays (1769 Appointed - 1774)[61]
  • Hugues-François de Regnault-Bellescize (1774 Appointed - 20 September 1796 Died)[62]
    • Jean-Marie Jacob (Constitutional Bishop) (1791 – 1801)[63]
Bishop Denis Moutel

1800 to present[edit]

  • Jean-Baptiste de Caffarelli du Falga (9 April 1802 Appointed - 11 January 1815 Died)[64]
  • Mathias Le Groing de La Romagère[65] (11 October 1817 Appointed - 19 February 1841 Died)
  • Jacques-Jean-Pierre Le Mée (22 March 1841 Appointed - 31 July 1858 Died)[66]
  • Guillaume-Elisée Martial (3 August 1858 Appointed - 26 December 1861 Died)[67]
  • Augustin David (14 January 1862 Appointed - 27 July 1882 Died)[68]
  • Eugène-Ange-Marie Bouché (20 September 1882 Appointed - 4 June 1888 Died)[69]
  • Pierre-Marie-Frédéric Fallières (28 August 1889 Appointed - 11 May 1906 Died)[70]
  • Jules-Laurent-Benjamin Morelle (13 July 1906 Appointed - 9 January 1923 Died)[71]
  • François-Jean-Marie Serrand[72] (4 June 1923 Appointed - 20 March 1949 Died)
  • Armand Coupel[73] † (20 March 1949 Succeeded - 19 January 1961 Retired)
  • François-Louis-Marie Kervéadou[74] † (19 January 1961 Appointed - 2 October 1976 Resigned)
  • Pierre Jean Marie Kervennic[75] † (2 October 1976 Appointed - 21 December 1991 Died)
  • Lucien Fruchaud[76] (17 July 1992 Appointed - 20 August 2010 Retired)
  • Denis Moutel[77] (20 August 2010 Appointed - )

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andrew Mooney (2011), Celtic Saints, St. Brieuc
  2. ^ Duchesne, p. 390. The Life can be read in: Godefroy Henschen; Daniel van Papenbroeck (1680). Acta Sanctorum Maii (in Latin). Tomus I. Antwerp: apud Michaelem Cnobarum. pp. 91–94. 
  3. ^ Duchesne, p. 390.
  4. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, p. 271.
  5. ^ Acta Sanctorum p. 94.
  6. ^ Gallia christiana XIV (1856), p. 1086.
  7. ^ Princeton University Library, Engraving of Denis de la Barde. Retrieved: 2016-09-02.
  8. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 147-161.
  9. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, pp. 1085-1086.
  10. ^ Text of Civil Constitution of the Clergy (in English) Retrieved: 2016-09-02.
  11. ^ Paul Pisani (1907). Répertoire biographique de l'épiscopat constitutionnel (1791-1802). (in French). Paris: A. Picard et fils. pp. 130–132; 53–58. 
  12. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne, I, pp. 69-70.
  13. ^ Jules-Henri Geslin De Bourgogne and A. de Barthelemy (1856). Anciens évêchés de Bretagne: histoire et monuments (in French). Tome II. Paris: Dumoulin. pp. 452–538.  M. G. de Kerigant (1882). Les Chouans: épisodes des guerres de l'Ouest dans les Côtes-du-Nord, depuis 1792 jusqu'en 1800 (in French). Yves Salmon. 
  14. ^ Duchesne, p. 391. Cf. Geslin de Bourgogne and de Barthelemy, I, pp. 4-5.
  15. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and de Barthelemy, I, p. 5.
  16. ^ Haemon: Gallia christiana XIV, pp. 1085-1087. Gams, p. 615 column 2.
  17. ^ Guillaume: Geslin de Bourgogne and de Barthelemy, I, p. 6. Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1087.
  18. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and de Barthelemy, I, p. 7. Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1087. Gams, p. 615 column 2.
  19. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1088. Gams, p. 615, assigns the dates 1147–1149.
  20. ^ Joscius was Bishop of S. Brieuc for six years. Geslin de Bourgogne and de Barthelemy, I, pp. 7-9. Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1088. Gams, p. 615.
  21. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1088.
  22. ^ Goffridus (Gaufredus) attended the Lateran Council of Pope Alexander III in 1179. J.-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice: A. Zatta 1778), p. 464. Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1088-1089.
  23. ^ Joscelin: Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1089. Eubel, I, p. 146.
  24. ^ Guillaume: Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1089. Eubel, I, p. 146.
  25. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, pp. 1089-1090; Instrumenta, pp 262-263. Eubel, I, p. 146.
  26. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1090. Eubel, I, p. 146.
  27. ^ Because of a dispute with Duke Pierre 'Mauclerc', who was systematically attempting to limit the power of the clergy, Bishop Guillaume was forced into exile in Poitiers, 1228-1231. Guimart, pp. 42-49.
  28. ^ The election of a successor to Guillaume Pinchon first produced Canon Nicholas, the Scholasticus. The election, however, was irregular, and was annulled by the Metropolitan, the Archbishop of Tours. The canons then elected one of themselves, Canon Alain, who was also Treasurer of the Cathedral of Vannes; this too was annulled. Finally the Archbishop appointed Bishop Philippe, who had been a Canon and friend of Guillaume Pinchon. Bishop Philippe died while on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1248. Guimart, pp. 51-53. Eubel, I, p. 146.
  29. ^ Andreas: Gallia christiana XIV, pp. 1091-1092; Instrumenta, p. 266.
  30. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, p. 14.
  31. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 14-15.
  32. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 15-16.
  33. ^ Eubel, I, p. 146. Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 17-20.
  34. ^ Eubel, I, p. 225.
  35. ^ Eubel, I, p. 22.
  36. ^ Eubel, I, p. 66 and 146. Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 28-29.
  37. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 29-30.
  38. ^ Eubel, I, p. 146 and 356. Jean de Châteaugiron was Chancellor of Bretagne: Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 31-32. He was transferred to Nantes by Pope Martin V.
  39. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, p. 36. Eubel, II, p. 110-111.
  40. ^ Eubel II, p. 111 and 183.
  41. ^ Jean L'Espervier also served as Chancellor of Bretagne. He had attended the Council of Basel, for which he was excommunicated, but he was restored by Eugenius IV in 1441 after he abandoned it. Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 36-37.
  42. ^ Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 37-40.
  43. ^ Pierre de Montfort de Laval was the son of Guy XIV Comte de Laval and Isabelle of Brittany. He was appointed Archbishop of Reims on 8 October 1473, and after being appointed Archbishop of Reims he retained the diocese of Saint-Brieuc in commendam until 1478. He died on 14 July 1493. Eubel, II, p. 111; 223 with note 4.
  44. ^ Christophe de Penmarc'h and Pierre de Laval had a long-running lawsuit over the appointment of Bishop Christophe, that was only settled by Innocent VIII in 1485, who gave Laval the Diocese of Saint-Malo: Geslin de Bourgogne and Barthelemy, I, pp. 40-41. Eubel, II, p. 111 with note 3.
  45. ^ Olivier du Châtel: Guimart, pp. 105-106. Eubel, III, p. 125 with note 3.
  46. ^ Rieux: Guimart, pp. 106-108. Eubel, III, p. 125 with note 4.
  47. ^ Mauny: : Guimart, pp. 108-109. Eubel, III, p. 125 with note 5.
  48. ^ Tillet was later transferred to [[Bishop of Meaux|Meaux]. He died in Paris in December 1570. Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1102. Guimart, pp. 109-110. Eubel, III, pp. 140 and 240.
  49. ^ Lancelier was a native of Paris and held the degree of Doctor of Canon Law. He followed the League, while the citizens of Saint-Brieuc followed Henry III. He died on 24 September 1595. Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1102. Guimart, pp. 110-114. Eubel, III, p. 140 with note 9.
  50. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, pp. 1102-1103. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 121 with note 2.
  51. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1103 (erroneously placing Andreas' death in 1632). Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 121 with note 3.
  52. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1103. Gauchat, IV, p. 121.
  53. ^ Gallia christiana XIV, p. 1103. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 121 with note 4.
  54. ^ De la Hoguette was nominated by King Louis XIV of France on 12 September 1675, and approved by Pope Clement X on 23 March 1676. He was appointed Bishop of Poitiers on 15 July 1580. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 126 with note 3.
  55. ^ Coetlogon was nominated by Louis XIV on 6 September 1680, and approved by Pope Innocent XI on 1 September 1681. He was appointed Bishop of Tournai on 7 September 1705. Jean, p. 443. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 126 with note 4.
  56. ^ Frétat de Boissieu was appointed by Louis XIV on 11 July 1705, and approved by Pope Clement XI on 7 September 1705. Jean, p. 444. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 126 with note 5.
  57. ^ Guillaume de La Vieuxville-Pourpris (Guillaume is part of his surname: Gaston Louis Michel Marie baron de Carné (1900). Revue historique de l'Ouest (in French). 16. Vannes: Bureaux de la Revue. p. 49. ) was Abbot commendatory of the Abbey of S. Maurice from 1681-1727: Gallia christiana XIV (1856), p. 910. He was Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Nantes from 1699. He was appointed by the King on 8 January 1721, and approved by Pope Innocent XIII on 28 May 1721. On 6 July 1721 he was consecrated at the Jacobins in Paris by the Archbishop of Rouen, and the Bishops of Nantes and Tarbes: Mercure français (in French). Paris: Au bureau du Mercure. 1721. p. 113.  Jean, p. 444.
  58. ^ Montclus: Appointed, Bishop of Alès (Alais). Jean, p. 444.
  59. ^ Born in the diocese of Tréguier, Thepault de Brignou held a Licenciate in Canon and Civil Law (Paris). He was a Canon, Cantor and Vicar General of the Chapter of Quimper. Jean, p. 444. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 130 with note 2.
  60. ^ Born in the city of Angoulême, Bareau de Girac was a Bachelor of theology (Paris) and held the Licenciate in the Two Laws (Orléans). He was Vicar General of Angoulême when appointed by King Louis XV to Saint-Brieuc. He resigned the diocese on 25 January 1770, and was appointed Bishop of Rennes on 12 March 1770. He resigned in 1801, and died in Paris on 29 November 1820. Jean, p. 445. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 130 with note 3; 354 with note 5.
  61. ^ Ferronnays: Appointed Bishop of Bayonne on 13 March 1775, and Bishop of Lisieux on 15 December 1783. He died in exile in Munich on 15 May 1799. Jean, p. 445. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 113 with note 5; 131 with note 4; 261 with note 3.
  62. ^ Bellescize died in Paris on 20 September 1796. Jean, p. 445. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 131 with note 5.
  63. ^ Charles Guimart (1852). Histoire des évêques de Saint-Brieuc ... (in French). Saint-Brieuc: Prud'homme. pp. 153–154. 
  64. ^ Caffarelli: Guimart, pp. 154-156. J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., pp. 547-548.
  65. ^ La Romagère had been Canon, Theologian, and Grand Vicar of the diocese of Châlons-sur-Marne before the French Revolution. In 1791 he refused the oath to the Constitution. During the Terror, he retired to the Abbey of Jouarre. At Easter 1793 he was arrested and taken to Bourges, destined for the guillotine. Garaby, Malo-Joseph de (1841). Vie de Mgr Le Groing de La Romagère, évêque... de Saint-Brieuc, suivie d'une notice sur M. Le Mée, son successeur (in French). Saint-Brieuc: Ch. Le Maout. pp. 7–10.  Guimart, pp. 156-158. J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., pp. 548-549 (French).
  66. ^ Le Mée: Guimart, p. 158. J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., pp. 549-550.
  67. ^ Martial: J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., pp. 550-551.
  68. ^ David: J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., p. 551.
  69. ^ Bouché: J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., p. 552.
  70. ^ Fallières: J. Gadiou, in: L'épiscopat français..., pp. 552-553.
  71. ^ Morelle: J. P. Poey (1908). Évêques de France: biographies et portraits de tous les cardinaux, archevêques et évêques de France et des colonies (in French) (third ed.). Paris: P. Lethielleux. pp. 142–144. 
  72. ^ Diocese of Saint-Brieuc, Biography of Francois-Jean-Marie-Serrand. (French) Retrieved: 2016-09-03
  73. ^ Diocese of Saint-Brieuc, Biography of Armand Coupel. (French) Retrieved: 2016-09-02
  74. ^ Diocese of Saint-Brieuc, Biography of François Kervéadou. (French) Retrieved: 2016-09-02.
  75. ^ Diocese of Saint-Brieuc, Biography of Pierre Kervennic. (French) Retrieved: 2016-09-02.
  76. ^ Diocese of Saint-Brieuc, Biography of Lucien Fruchaud. (French) Retrieved: 2016-09-02.
  77. ^ Diocese of Saint-Brieuc, Biography of Denis Moutel.(French) Retrieved: 2016-09-03

Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

  • (French) Centre national des Archives de l'Église de France, L’Épiscopat francais depuis 1919, retrieved: 2016-12-24.
  • Goyau, Georges. "Saint-Brieuc." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 13. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. Retrieved: 2016-09-01.

Acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Saint-Brieuc". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.