Franklin, New Jersey

Coordinates: 41°06′32″N 74°35′19″W / 41.108997°N 74.588641°W / 41.108997; -74.588641
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Franklin, New Jersey
House in Franklin
House in Franklin
Official seal of Franklin, New Jersey
Nickname: 
Fluorescent Mineral Capital of the World[1]
Location of Franklin in Sussex County highlighted in red (left). Inset map: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey highlighted in orange (right).
Location of Franklin in Sussex County highlighted in red (left). Inset map: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey highlighted in orange (right).
Census Bureau map of Franklin, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Franklin, New Jersey
Franklin is located in Sussex County, New Jersey
Franklin
Franklin
Location in Sussex County
Franklin is located in New Jersey
Franklin
Franklin
Location in New Jersey
Franklin is located in the United States
Franklin
Franklin
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 41°06′32″N 74°35′19″W / 41.108997°N 74.588641°W / 41.108997; -74.588641[2][3]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
IncorporatedApril 23, 1913
Named forBenjamin Franklin
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorJohn M. Sowden IV (R, term ends December 31, 2023)[4][5]
 • AdministratorAndrew Bernath[6]
 • Municipal clerkDarlene J. Tremont[7]
Area
 • Total4.43 sq mi (11.47 km2)
 • Land4.36 sq mi (11.28 km2)
 • Water0.07 sq mi (0.19 km2)  1.60%
 • Rank284th of 565 in state
17th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation541 ft (165 m)
Population
 • Total4,912
 • Estimate 
(2022)[12]
4,967
 • Rank378th of 565 in state
10th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density1,127.6/sq mi (435.4/km2)
  • Rank369th of 565 in state
7th of 24 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)973 exchanges: 209, 823, 827[16]
FIPS code3403724930[2][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885224[2][19]
Websitewww.franklinborough.org

Franklin is a borough in Sussex County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 4,912,[11] a decrease of 133 (−2.6%) from the 2010 census count of 5,045,[20][21] which in turn reflected a decline of 115 (−2.2%) from the 5,160 counted in the 2000 census.[22]

Franklin, known as the "Fluorescent Mineral Capital of the World,"[23] is located over a rich ore body containing more than 150 minerals, many of them fluorescent and 25 of which are found nowhere else on earth. Settled in the 17th century, the village known as Franklin Furnace after Benjamin Franklin,[24][25][26] developed near iron mines and iron smelting operations located along the Wallkill River. In the early 19th century, zinc deposits in the area began to be developed commercially. For most of the century many small companies mined zinc and iron in the Franklin area. In 1897 all zinc mining efforts merged into the New Jersey Zinc Company, which was a major controlling factor in the development of Franklin. Immigrants from Russia, Britain, Hungary and Poland joined the work force at the mine. The population, 500 in 1897, had swelled to 3,000 by 1913. On March 18, 1913, the Borough of Franklin was incorporated from portions of Hardyston Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 23, 1913.[27]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 4.43 square miles (11.47 km2), including 4.36 square miles (11.28 km2) of land and 0.07 square miles (0.19 km2) of water (1.60%).[2][3]

The borough borders the boroughs of Hamburg and Ogdensburg, as well as Sparta and Hardyston townships.[28][29][30][31]

Franklin Furnace provides many examples of the complex mineralogy of the area.[32]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
19204,075
19304,1762.5%
19404,009−4.0%
19503,864−3.6%
19603,624−6.2%
19704,23616.9%
19804,4865.9%
19904,97710.9%
20005,1603.7%
20105,045−2.2%
20204,912−2.6%
2022 (est.)4,967[12]1.1%
Population sources:
1920[33] 1920–1930[34]
1940–2000[35] 2000[36][37]
2010[20][21] 2020[11]

2010 census[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 5,045 people, 1,936 households, and 1,316 families in the borough. The population density was 1,121.6 per square mile (433.1/km2). There were 2,136 housing units at an average density of 474.9 per square mile (183.4/km2). The racial makeup was 92.15% (4,649) White, 2.18% (110) Black or African American, 0.30% (15) Native American, 1.74% (88) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.23% (62) from other races, and 2.40% (121) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.83% (395) of the population.[20]

Of the 1,936 households, 28.7% had children under the age of 18; 49.7% were married couples living together; 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present and 32.0% were non-families. Of all households, 26.7% were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.15.[20]

22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 31.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.3 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 93.1 males.[20]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,813 (with a margin of error of +/− $7,585) and the median family income was $81,875 (+/− $11,964). Males had a median income of $49,413 (+/− $8,152) versus $45,385 (+/− $9,926) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,708 (+/− $2,344). About 5.1% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.4% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.[38]

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States census[17] there were 5,160 people, 1,898 households, and 1,324 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,150.2 inhabitants per square mile (444.1/km2). There were 1,997 housing units at an average density of 445.1 per square mile (171.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.10% White, 0.62% African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.47% Asian, 1.22% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.42% of the population.[36][37]

There were 1,898 households, out of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.22.[36][37]

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 27.5% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.9 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,985, and the median income for a family was $52,682. Males had a median income of $41,080 versus $26,201 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,386. About 5.6% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Franklin is governed under the borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 564) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[39] The governing body is comprised of the mayor and the borough council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The borough council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[8] The borough form of government used by Franklin is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[40][41]

As of 2022, the mayor of Franklin Borough is Republican John M. Sowden IV, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Borough Council are Concetto Formica (R, 2022), Rachel Heath (R, 2024), Joseph Limon (R, 2023), John E. Postas (R, 2023), Stephen M. Skellenger (R, 2022) and Gilbert J. Snyder (R, 2024).[4][42][43][44][45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Franklin is located in the 5th Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[47][48][49]

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's 5th congressional district is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[50][51] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[52] and Bob Menendez (Englewood Cliffs, term ends 2025).[53][54]

For the 2024-2025 session, the 24th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and in the General Assembly by Dawn Fantasia (R, Franklin) and Mike Inganamort (R, Chester Township).[55]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Commissioner Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[56] As of 2024, Sussex County's Commissioners are:

William Hayden (R, Branchville, 2025), Deputy Director Chris Carney (R, Frankford Township, 2024),[57] Earl Schick (R, Newton, 2024),[58] Director Jill Space (R, Wantage Township, 2025)[59] and Jack DeGroot (R, Sussex, 2026).[60][61]

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are: Clerk Jeffrey M. Parrott (R, Wantage Township, 2026),[62] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, Hampton Township, 2025)[63] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, Frankford Township, 2028).[64]

Elections[edit]

As of March 2011, there were a total of 3,071 registered voters in Franklin, of which 469 (15.3% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,302 (42.4% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,296 (42.2% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[65] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 60.9% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 78.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[65][66]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,121 votes (57.2% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 772 votes (39.4% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 58 votes (3.0% vs. 2.1%), among the 1,959 ballots cast by the borough's 3,095 registered voters, for a turnout of 63.3% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[67] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,213 votes (57.2% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 857 votes (40.4% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 37 votes (1.7% vs. 1.5%), among the 2,122 ballots cast by the borough's 2,930 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,269 votes (63.4% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 695 votes (34.7% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 28 votes (1.4% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,001 ballots cast by the borough's 2,740 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.0% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[69]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.6% of the vote (841 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 27.7% (339 votes), and other candidates with 3.8% (46 votes), among the 1,242 ballots cast by the borough's 3,134 registered voters (16 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 39.6%.[70][71] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 870 votes (63.0% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 361 votes (26.1% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 116 votes (8.4% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 26 votes (1.9% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,382 ballots cast by the borough's 2,936 registered voters, yielding a 47.1% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[72]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Franklin Borough School District.[73] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 439 students and 47.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.2:1.[74]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Wallkill Valley Regional High School which also serves students from Hamburg Borough, Hardyston Township and Ogdensburg Borough, and is part of the Wallkill Valley Regional High School District.[75] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 604 students and 56.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.8:1.[76] Seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated based on the populations of the constituent municipalities, with two seats assigned to Franklin.[77]

Transportation[edit]

Route 23 and County Route 517 northbound in Franklin

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 26.87 miles (43.24 km) of roadways, of which 21.00 miles (33.80 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.93 miles (4.72 km) by Sussex County and 2.94 miles (4.73 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[78]

The main highway providing service to Franklin is Route 23.[79] County Route 517 also traverses the borough, mostly concurrent with Route 23.[80]

Public transportation[edit]

The county provides Skylands Ride bus service operating between Sussex and Newton.[81]

Media[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Franklin include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Home page, Borough of Franklin. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Council Members, Borough of Franklin. Accessed April 26, 2022.
  5. ^ 2023 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, updated February 8, 2023. Accessed February 10, 2023.
  6. ^ Administrators Office, Borough of Franklin. Accessed April 20, 2023.
  7. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Franklin. Accessed April 20, 2023.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  9. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  10. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Franklin, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Total Population: Census 2010 - Census 2020 New Jersey Municipalities, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  12. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2022, United States Census Bureau, released May 2023. Accessed May 18, 2023.
  13. ^ a b Population Density by County and Municipality: New Jersey, 2020 and 2021, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 1, 2023.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Franklin, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Franklin, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Franklin borough, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Franklin borough Archived 2014-08-18 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  22. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed May 1, 2023.
  23. ^ Fluorescent Minerals, Fluorescent Mineral Society. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  24. ^ Franklinite Mineral Page, mindat.org. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  25. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  26. ^ Herman, Jennifer New Jersey Encyclopedia, p. 277. State History Publications, 2008. ISBN 9781878592446. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  27. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 230. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  28. ^ Areas touching Franklin, MapIt. Accessed March 31, 2020.
  29. ^ Sussex County Map, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed March 31, 2020.
  30. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  31. ^ The Hospital Site Redevelopment Plan, Franklin Borough, revised August 8, 2017. Accessed January 14, 2018. "In terms of this redevelopment plan's consistency with other planning documents, the only municipality that is contiguous to this part of Franklin is Hardyston Township. Ogdensburg, Hamburg and Sparta are also contiguous to Franklin but those municipalities are far removed from the Hospital Site Redevelopment Area."
  32. ^ History, Borough of Franklin. Accessed April 29, 2015. "Franklin, known as the Fluorescent Mineral Capital of the World, is located over a rich ore body containing more than 150 minerals, many of them fluorescent and 25 of which are found no where else on earth."
  33. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  34. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  35. ^ Table 6: New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1940 - 2000, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, August 2001. Accessed May 1, 2023.
  36. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Franklin borough, New Jersey Archived 2015-02-01 at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  37. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Franklin borough, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  38. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Franklin borough, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 15, 2012.
  39. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed June 1, 2023.
  40. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask" Archived 2014-09-24 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  41. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 1, 2023.
  42. ^ 2022 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Franklin. Accessed August 2, 2022.
  43. ^ Summary Results Report November 2, 2021 General Election Official Results, Sussex County, New Jersey, updated November 22, 2021. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  44. ^ Election Summary November 3, 2020 General Election Official Amended Results, Sussex County, New Jersey, updated December 10, 2020. Accessed January 1, 2021.
  45. ^ Sussex County, New Jersey General Election November 5, 2019, Official Results Summary Report, Sussex County, New Jersey, dated November 8, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  46. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  47. ^ Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  48. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  49. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  51. ^ Biography, Congressman Josh Gottheimer. Accessed January 3, 2019. "Josh now lives in Wyckoff, New Jersey with Marla, his wife who was a federal prosecutor, and their two young children, Ellie and Ben."
  52. ^ U.S. Sen. Cory Booker cruises past Republican challenger Rik Mehta in New Jersey, PhillyVoice. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  53. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  54. ^ Home, sweet home: Bob Menendez back in Hudson County. nj.com. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  55. ^ Legislative Roster for District 24, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 18, 2024.
  56. ^ About County Government, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022. "Sussex County is governed by five (5) Commissioners who are elected by the voters of Sussex County. Each serves on the county’s Board of County Commissioners for a term of three (3) years, after which time they can seek re‐election or retire.... The Commissioners are elected at‐large to serve three‐year staggered terms. The five Commissioners elect a director from among themselves to run their meetings and to serve as a spokesperson for the board."
  57. ^ Chris Carney, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  58. ^ Dawn Fantasia, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  59. ^ Jill Space, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  60. ^ Herbert Yardley, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  61. ^ Board of County Commissioners, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  62. ^ Contact Us, Sussex County Clerk. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  63. ^ Administration, Sussex County Sheriff's Office. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  64. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Surrogate. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  65. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  66. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  67. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed January 5, 2017.
  68. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  69. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  70. ^ "Governor – Sussex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  71. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Sussex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  72. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County Archived 2013-06-06 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  73. ^ Franklin Borough Board of Education Policy 0110 - Identification, Franklin Borough School District. Accessed March 31, 2020. "The Franklin School District shall be comprised of all of the area within the municipal boundaries of the Borough of Franklin for the purpose of providing a program of education in grades Kindergarten through 8."
  74. ^ District information for Franklin Borough School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  75. ^ Jennings, Rob. "Wallkill Valley grad named superintendent/principal", New Jersey Herald, August 26, 2015. Accessed October 28, 2017. "Wallkill Valley Regional High School enrolls students from Hamburg, Hardyston, Ogdensburg and Franklin."
  76. ^ School data for Wallkill Valley Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  77. ^ Dates and Board Members, Wallkill Valley Regional High School. Accessed August 27, 2020.
  78. ^ Sussex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  79. ^ Route 23 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated June 2017. Accessed November 20, 2022.
  80. ^ County Route 517 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated November 2012. Accessed November 20, 2022.
  81. ^ Skylands Ride Route Map, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2015.
  82. ^ Data for Station Wsus, Federal Communications Commission. Accessed October 12, 2009.
  83. ^ Gertrude Margaret Clarke obituary, The Star-Ledger, May 22, 2020. Accessed February 27, 2023. "Gert, as she was known to friends and family, was born on May 28th, 1932 in Franklin, N.J. She attended Franklin High, earned her baccalaureate degree from Douglass College in 1954, attended pre-doctoral courses at Rutgers University, and studied atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics at Yale University Graduate School."
  84. ^ "EMS' oldest living alumna looks back on making history at Penn State", Penn State News, May 5, 2014. Accessed October 29, 2019. "Born in 1916 in Franklin Furnace, N.J., Alexandra Tillson Filer, 97, was raised in one of the most important mining towns in the country at the time."
  85. ^ Staff. "Charles J. Fletcher: Obituary", New Jersey Herald, April 22, 2011. Accessed April 29, 2015. "Charles J. Fletcher, 88, died Wednesday, April 20, 2011, at Saint Clare's Hospital, in Sussex. Mr. Fletcher, son of the late Horace and Florence (Romyns) Fletcher was born in Franklin on Dec. 21, 1922."
  86. ^ "Fowler, Samuel, (1779 - 1844)", Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed April 29, 2015.
  87. ^ Staff. "Alfred B. Littell, Jersey Legislator", The New York Times, December 15, 1970. Accessed August 31, 2020. "The elder Mr. Littell had been mayor of Franklin in 1956 and 1957, and served as a Sussex County Freeholder in 1956."
  88. ^ Staff. "Robert E. 'Bob' Littell: Obituary", New Jersey Herald, November 16, 2014. "Senator Robert E. 'Bob' Littell, 78, died after a long illness at his home surrounded by his family on Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Born to the late Senator Alfred B. Littell and Dorothy A. Kershner in Orange, he was a lifelong resident of Franklin."
  89. ^ Charles Francis Lynch, Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Accessed April 29, 2015. "Lynch, Charles Francis – Born January 9, 1884, in Franklin, New Jersey"
  90. ^ Novak, Steve. "Assemblywoman Alison Littell McHose to resign; search for replacement begins", The Express-Times, January 2, 2015. Accessed February 20, 2017. "McHose, 49, on Thursday was named business administrator of the Sussex County borough of Franklin, where she lives with her husband and three children."
  91. ^ Steve Nagy, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed April 29, 2015.
  92. ^ Senator Steven V. Oroho (R), New Jersey Legislature. Accessed April 29, 2015.

Further reading[edit]

  • Jones Jr., Robert W. Nature's Hidden Rainbows : The Fluorescent Minerals of Franklin, New Jersey (San Gabriel, California: Ultra-Violet Products, Inc., 1964).
  • McCabe, Wayne T. and Kate Gordon. A Penny A View...An Album of Postcard Views...Franklin, N.J. (Newton, New Jersey: Historic Preservation Alternatives, 2000).
  • Truran, William R. Franklin, Hamburg, Ogdensburg, and Hardyston (Images of America). (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2004).

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