Hotel Mumbai

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Hotel Mumbai
Hotel Mumbai poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byAnthony Maras
Produced by
Screenplay by
Starring
Music byVolker Bertelmann
CinematographyNick Remy Matthews
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by
Release date
  • 7 September 2018 (2018-09-07) (TIFF)
  • 14 March 2019 (2019-03-14) (Australia)
  • 22 March 2019 (2019-03-22) (United States)
Running time
125 minutes[1]
Country
  • Australia
  • India
  • United States
Budget$17.3 million ($25 million AUD)[2]
Box office$21.1 million ($31.5 million AUD)[3]

Hotel Mumbai is a 2018 Australian–American biographical thriller film directed by Anthony Maras and co-written by Maras and John Collee. The film is inspired by the 2009 documentary Surviving Mumbai[4] about the Mumbai attacks in 2008 at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in India. The film stars Dev Patel, Armie Hammer, Nazanin Boniadi, Anupam Kher, Tilda Cobham-Hervey, Jason Isaacs, Suhail Nayyar, Nagesh Bhosle and Natasha Liu Bordizzo.

The film premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival on 7 September 2018, and had its Australian premiere at the Adelaide Film Festival on 10 October 2018. The film was released in Australia on 14 March 2019, and in the United States on 22 March 2019.

Plot[edit]

On 26 November 2008, young waiter Arjun reports for work at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in Mumbai, India, under head chef Hemant Oberoi, who reminds his staff that "Guest is God". The day's guests include British-Muslim heiress Zahra and her American husband David, with their infant son Cameron and his nanny Sally, as well as ex-Spetznaz operative Vasili.

That night, 10 terrorists, directed by a man known as "the Bull", launch a coordinated assault against 12 locations across Mumbai, including the hotel. As the local police are not properly trained or equipped to handle the attack, they can only wait for special forces to arrive from New Delhi. In the ensuing chaos, Arjun, David, Zahra and Vasili are trapped in the hotel restaurant with several other guests while Sally, unaware of what is going on, remains with Cameron in their hotel room.

David sneaks past the terrorists and successfully reaches Sally and Cameron. Arjun follows Oberoi's instructions and escorts the guests under his care to the Chambers Lounge, an exclusive club hidden within the hotel, where they hope to remain safe. David, Sally and Cameron attempt to regroup with them, but David is captured by the terrorists and taken hostage while Sally and Cameron are trapped in a closet.

Meanwhile, police officer DC Vam and his partner decide to enter the hotel in the hopes of reaching the security room so they can track the terrorists' movements. Arjun attempts to escort a mortally wounded guest, Bree, off the premises so she can reach a hospital. The two encounter the police but Bree panics and flees, only to be shot dead by a terrorist. Arjun escorts the police to the security room, and they discover the terrorists are about to break into the Chambers Lounge using the identification of a policeman they killed earlier. The police officer DC Vam order Arjun to stay put and attack the terrorists, successfully wounding one before being driven off. Against Oberoi's advice, Zahra and Vasili decide to leave the lounge to escape but they are also caught and taken hostage.

Eventually, special forces arrive, and the Bull orders the terrorists to move to the final phase of their plan: burning the hotel down. The terrorists leave their wounded member, Imran, to oversee the hostages, and the Bull eventually tells him to kill them. Imran executes both David and Vasili, but spares Zahra when she begins reciting a Muslim prayer, ignoring the Bull's command to shoot her regardless.

Arjun regroups with Oberoi and evacuates the remaining guests, stumbling upon Sally and Cameron in the process. The special forces kill the remaining terrorists, and Zahra is evacuated by crane, reuniting with Sally and Cameron. After the hotel is secure, Arjun returns home and reunites with his wife and daughter. Meanwhile, The Taj Hotel staff is seen re-opening the Hotel.

A closing monologue reveals that those responsible for the attack remain free to this day. The final scenes show a memorial to the staff and guests who fought in the Battle of Hotel Mumbai.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

On 11 February 2016, it was announced that Dev Patel and Armie Hammer had been cast in the film, along with actors Nazanin Boniadi, Teresa Palmer, and Suhail Nayyar, while Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Anupam Kher were in negotiations; Palmer and Coster-Waldau ultimately were not involved.[5] John Collee and Anthony Maras wrote the screenplay, which Maras directed, while Basil Iwanyk produced the film through Thunder Road Pictures along with Jomon Thomas from Xeitgeist, Arclight Films' Gary Hamilton and Mike Gabrawy, Electric Pictures' Andrew Ogilvie, and Julie Ryan.[5]

In June, Tilda Cobham-Hervey joined the cast[6] after Teresa Palmer pulled out early into her second pregnancy,[7] and in August, Jason Isaacs was cast.[8] On 7 September 2016, Natasha Liu Bordizzo joined the film to play Bree, a tourist caught in the attack.[9]

Filming[edit]

In August 2016, principal photography on the film began in the Adelaide Film studios, run by the South Australian Film Corporation.[10][11] Filming continued in India in early 2017.[12]

Release[edit]

In May 2016, The Weinstein Company acquired U.S. and U.K. distribution rights to the film.[13] However, in April 2018, it was announced that The Weinstein Company would no longer distribute the film.[14] In August 2018, Bleecker Street and ShivHans Pictures acquired U.S. distribution rights to the film.[15]

The film had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on 7 September 2018.[16] It was theatrically released in Australia on 14 March 2019, by Icon Film Distribution,[17] and the United States on 22 March 2019.[18] It is scheduled for a United Kingdom release in September 2019, by Sky Cinema and NowTV. Sky Cinema is promoting this as a "Sky Cinema Original" in the United Kingdom.[19]

The movie was pulled from cinemas in New Zealand due to the Christchurch mosque shootings on 15 March 2019, with showings suspended until 28 March, .[20]

Netflix was set to distribute the film in India and other South and Southeast Asian territories.[21] However, Netflix later dropped the film, after a contractual dispute arose with Indian distributor Plus Holdings.[22]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Hotel Mumbai has grossed $9.7 million in the United States and Canada, and $11.5 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $21.2 million.[3][23]

The film opened in four theaters in the U.S., on 22 March, and expanded to 924 on 29 March, grossing $3.1 million in that second weekend.[24]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 75% based on 186 reviews, with an average of 6.91/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Its depiction of real-life horror will strike some as exploitative, but Hotel Mumbai remains a well-made dramatization of tragic events."[25] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 62 out of 100, based on 33 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[26] Audiences polled by PostTrak gave the film an overall positive score of 77% and a 50% "definite recommend".[24]

Peter Debruge of Variety magazine wrote: "Sitting through the harrowing events again nearly a decade later could hardly be described as entertainment, and the film plays to many of the same unseemly impulses that make disaster movies so compelling, exploiting the tragedy of the situation for spectacle’s sake."[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hotel Mumbai". Toronto International Film Festival. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  2. ^ Mitchell, Peter (11 October 2018). "Adelaide becomes Mumbai for thriller". Blue Mountains Gazette. Retrieved 20 June 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Hotel Mumbai (2019) – Financial Information". The Numbers. Retrieved 27 July 2019.
  4. ^ Kenigsberg, Ben (21 March 2019). "'Hotel Mumbai' Review: Terrorism as Popcorn Movie?". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  5. ^ a b Jaafar, Ali (11 February 2016). "Dev Patel & Armie Hammer in Negotiations For Mumbai Siege Pic 'Hotel Mumbai' – Berlin". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 13 August 2016.
  6. ^ Galuppo, Mia (9 June 2016). "Tilda Cobham-Hervey Will Join Dev Patel in 'Hotel Mumbai' (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 13 August 2016.
  7. ^ Debelle, Penelope (10 October 2018). "More than a thousand attend launch of SA-made movie Hotel Mumbai at Adelaide Film Festival". The Advertiser. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  8. ^ Fleming, Mike Jr; Busch, Anita (12 August 2016). "Jason Isaacs Checks into Anthony Maras' 'Hotel Mumbai'". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 13 August 2016.
  9. ^ N'Duka, Amanda (7 September 2016). "John Karna Joins 'Lady Bird' Bevy; Natasha Liu Bordizzo Checks Into 'Hotel Mumbai'". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  10. ^ "Filming wraps on Adelaide set of Hotel Mumbai (2 September 2016)". South Australian Film Corporation. 2 September 2016. Archived from the original on 11 August 2018. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  11. ^ "Slumdog Millionaire star Dev Patel frequents Adelaide's Jasmin restaurant while here filming Hotel Mumbai". The Advertiser. 10 August 2016. Retrieved 13 August 2016.
  12. ^ Debelle, Penny (29 April 2016). "Slumdog Millionaire star Dev Patel to feature in movie to be partly filmed in SA on Mumbai terror attacks". The Advertiser. Retrieved 13 August 2016.
  13. ^ Jaafar, Ali (13 May 2016). "The Weinstein Co Acquires Dev Patel, Armie Hammer Mumbai Siege Pic 'Hotel Mumbai' – Cannes". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 13 August 2016.
  14. ^ Lang, Brent (2 April 2018). "'Hotel Mumbai' Producers Want Film Left Out of Weinstein Co. Bankruptcy Sale". Variety. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  15. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (22 August 2018). "'Hotel Mumbai', The Former Weinstein Movie, Scores Bleecker Street & ShivHans Deal Ahead Of Toronto Premiere". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  16. ^ Vlessing, Etan (24 July 2018). "Toronto: Timothee Chalamet Starrer 'Beautiful Boy,' Dan Fogelman's 'Life Itself' Among Festival Lineup". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  17. ^ "Hotel Mumbai". Palace Nova Cinemas. Archived from the original on 2 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  18. ^ Holub, Christian (9 January 2019). "Armie Hammer and Dev Patel are trapped by terrorists in Hotel Mumbai trailer". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  19. ^ Rowney, Jo-Anne (1 February 2019). "Hotel Mumbai trailer: Dev Patel and Armie Hammer star in movie inspired by 2008 terror attack". Daily Mirror. Archived from the original on 2 February 2019. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  20. ^ Bulbeck, Pip (19 March 2019). "'Hotel Mumbai' Pulled From Cinemas in New Zealand After Terrorist Attack". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 22 March 2019.
  21. ^ Hipes, Patrick (8 November 2018). "Netflix Unveils More Originals For India Market; Sets 'Hotel Mumbai' Regional Release, Priyanka Chopra-Produced Pic". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 9 November 2018.[verification needed]
  22. ^ Frater, Patrick; Ramachandran, Naman (7 March 2019). "Sued Over 'Hotel Mumbai,' Netflix Drops Plans for India Screening (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved 7 March 2019.[verification needed]
  23. ^ "Hotel Mumbai (2019)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  24. ^ a b D'Alessandro, Anthony (31 March 2019). "'Dumbo' Doesn't Soar With $45M Opening; Matthew McConaughey at Bottom With $1.8M 'Beach Bum' – Sunday Update". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  25. ^ "Hotel Mumbai (2019)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 25 July 2019.
  26. ^ "Hotel Mumbai reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  27. ^ Debruge, Peter (9 September 2018). "Film Review: 'Hotel Mumbai'". Variety.

External links[edit]