Liu He (politician)

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Liu He
刘鹤
Liu He, May 16, 2018.jpg
Liu He in 2018
Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China
Assumed office
19 March 2018
PremierLi Keqiang
Director of the Central Financial and Economic Affairs Commission Office
Assumed office
20 March 2013
DeputyChen Xiwen
General secretaryXi Jinping
Preceded byZhu Zhixin
Personal details
Born (1952-01-25) 25 January 1952 (age 69)
Beijing, China
Political partyCommunist Party of China
EducationBeijing 101 Middle School
Alma materRenmin University of China (BS, MS)
Harvard Kennedy School (MPA)

Liu He (simplified Chinese: 刘鹤; traditional Chinese: 劉鶴; pinyin: Liú Hè; born 25 January 1952) is a Chinese economist and politician, a current member of the Politburo of the Chinese Communist Party and one of the Vice Premiers of the People's Republic of China. Liu is also the director of the Office serving the Central Financial and Economic Affairs Commission of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP); the latter headed by CCP General Secretary Xi Jinping.[1] He was named vice-premier on 19 March 2018 and is heading the Financial Stability and Development Committee.[2][3]

Early life[edit]

Liu was born in Beijing. He studied at Beijing 101 Middle School.[4]

Education[edit]

Liu graduated from Renmin University-Beijing Union University with a degree in industrial economics. He later studied at Seton Hall University and received his Masters of Public Administration at Harvard University.[5]

Career[edit]

He has published widely on macroeconomics, Chinese industrial and economic development policy, new economic theory and the information industry.[5] He worked successively for the National Planning Commission, the State Information Center, and the Development Research Center of the State Council.[1]

Beginning in 2013, Liu began advising General Secretary Xi Jinping on a series of economic initiatives, and was believed to be one of the primary architects of Chinese economic policy at the time. He was also a member of the CCP 18th Central Committee.[1] Liu gave a keynote address to the 2018 World Economic Forum in Davos.[6]

At the CCP 19th National Congress in October 2017, Liu was promoted to the CCP Politburo. In March 2018, Liu He was appointed as a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China.[7] In May 2018, Liu He, was also appointed top trade negotiator for the China–United States trade war. In early October 2019, Liu He negotiated with his US counterparts on a preliminary trade deal.[8]

He is the head of the Financial Stability and Development Committee, and has been one of the key officials in the crackdown on Ant Group.[9]

Politics[edit]

He has been described as "one of the technocrats that Xi Jinping trusts a great deal".[10]

Family[edit]

He is the father of Liu Tianran, chair of Tianyi Ziteng Asset Management (alternatively known as Skycus Capital).[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Liu He". China Vitae. Retrieved 2015-04-08.
  2. ^ "China's Liu He to take broad economic role as vice-premier". Financia Times. 19 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Liu He: China's new one-man debt bomb disposal unit". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
  4. ^ Li, Cheng. "Xi Jinping's Inner Circle (Part 2: Friends from Xi's Formative Years)" (PDF). Hoover Institution. Retrieved 15 July 2020.
  5. ^ a b Vitae, China. "China Vitae : Biography of Liu He". chinavitae.com. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
  6. ^ Bradsher, Keith (January 28, 2018). "At Davos, the Real Star May Have Been China, Not Trump". The New York Times.
  7. ^ "国务院副总理、国务委员、各部部长完整名单" (in Chinese). Xinhua. March 19, 2018. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
  8. ^ "'You're very tough negotiators': Trump's truce in China-US trade war". ABC News. October 11, 2019. Retrieved 2019-10-27.
  9. ^ a b Mitchell, Tom; Kinder, Tabby; Sevastopulo, Demetri (19 May 2021). "Firm founded by son of China finance tsar invests heavily in tech". The Financial Times. Archived from the original on May 19, 2021.
  10. ^ Chotiner, Isaac. "A Political Economist on How China Sees Trump's Trade War". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.