MTV Video Music Award for Best Hip-Hop Video

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MTV Video Music Award for Best Hip-Hop Video
Awarded forhip-hop music videos
CountryUnited States
Presented byMTV
First awarded1999
Last awarded2018
Currently held byNicki Minaj — "Chun-Li" (2018)
WebsiteVMA website

The MTV Video Music Award for Best Hip-Hop Video was first given out at the 1999 MTV Video Music Awards. The award, according to MTV, was originally intended for hip-hop-inspired songs, not necessarily actual hip-hop music videos (which were instead honored by Best Rap Video). This explains the recognition of non-hip-hop songs such as "Thong Song" and "I'm Real (Remix)". The award was not given out in 2007, as the VMAs were revamped and most original categories were eliminated, however, Best Hip-Hop Video was reinstated in 2008. By then, though, the rules had relatively changed, as R&B and rap videos also became eligible for nominations in this category since the awards for Best Rap Video and Best R&B Video were not brought back.

Nicki Minaj and Drake are the biggest winners in this category, both winning three times. Kanye West owns the most nominations, with a total of nine. Missy Elliott was the first female rapper to win this category.

Recipients[edit]

Beastie Boys performing.
Inaugural winner Beastie Boys
Drake performing.
The 2012, 2014 and 2016 winner Drake
Macklemore and Ryan Lewis at Sasquatch 2011
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis won the award in 2013
Year Winner(s) Nominees Ref.
1999 Beastie Boys — "Intergalactic" [1]
2000 Sisqó — "Thong Song" [2]
2001 OutKast — "Ms. Jackson" [3]
2002 Jennifer Lopez (featuring Ja Rule) — "I'm Real (Remix)" [4]
2003 Missy Elliott — "Work It" [5]
2004 OutKast — "Hey Ya!" [6]
2005 Missy Elliott (featuring Ciara and Fatman Scoop) — "Lose Control" [7]
2006 The Black Eyed Peas — "My Humps" [8]
2007
2008 Lil Wayne (featuring Static Major) — "Lollipop" [9]
2009 Eminem — "We Made You" [10]
2010 Eminem — "Not Afraid" [11]
2011 Nicki Minaj — "Super Bass" [12]
2012 Drake (featuring Lil Wayne) — "HYFR" [13]
2013 Macklemore and Ryan Lewis (featuring Ray Dalton) — "Can't Hold Us" [14]
2014 Drake (featuring Majid Jordan) — "Hold On, We're Going Home" [15]
2015 Nicki Minaj — "Anaconda" [16]
2016 Drake — "Hotline Bling" [17]
2017 Kendrick Lamar — "HUMBLE."
2018 Nicki Minaj — "Chun-Li"

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1999". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  2. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2000". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  3. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2001". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  4. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2002". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  5. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2003". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  6. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2004". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  7. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2005". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  8. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2006". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  9. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2008". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  10. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2009". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  11. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2010". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  12. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2011". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  13. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2012". MTV. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  14. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2013". MTV. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  15. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2014". MTV. Retrieved September 3, 2015.
  16. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2015". MTV. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  17. ^ "2016 VMA Nominations: See the Full List Now". MTV News. Retrieved July 26, 2016.