ANA Inspiration

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ANA Inspiration
ANA Inspiration logo.jpg
Tournament information
LocationRancho Mirage, California
Established1972, 46 years ago
1983 (major championship)
Course(s)Mission Hills Country Club
Dinah Shore Tourn. Course
Par72
Length6,769 yards (6,190 m)
Organized byIMG / All Nippon Airways
Tour(s)LPGA Tour
FormatStroke play - 72 holes
Prize fund$2.8 million
Month playedMarch–April
Tournament record score
Aggregate269 Dottie Pepper (1999)
To par−19 Dottie Pepper (1999)
Current champion
Sweden Pernilla Lindberg
2018 ANA Inspiration
Rancho Mirage is located in the US
Rancho Mirage
Rancho Mirage
Location in the United States
Rancho Mirage is located in California
Rancho Mirage
Rancho
Mirage
Location in California

The ANA Inspiration (formerly known most recently as the Kraft Nabisco Championship, and still sometimes referred to as the Dinah Shore) is one of the five major championships of professional women's golf. An event of the LPGA Tour, it is held yearly at the Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, California.

Currently, in the United States, it is the only one of the five women's major golf tournaments not to have broadcast network exposure on the weekend; all four rounds are currently televised by the Golf Channel cable television network.

History[edit]

Founded in 1972 by Colgate-Palmolive chairman David Foster,[1][2] and entertainer Dinah Shore,[3] the tournament has been classified as a major since 1983.[4] Since its inception, it has been held annually at the Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, California, southeast of Palm Springs.[3] It is the first major of the year, usually played in late March or early April. All Nippon Airways became the title sponsor in late 2014, and IMG manages and operates the event for ANA.[5]

At its debut in 1972 as a 54-hole event, it was the richest event in women's golf;[3][6][7] its purse was more than double that of the LPGA Championship or the U.S. Women's Open. The first edition invited all winners of tour events from the previous ten seasons.[3]

Tournament names[edit]

Years Tournament name
1972–1980 Colgate-Dinah Shore Winner's Circle
1981 Colgate-Dinah Shore
1982 Nabisco Dinah Shore Invitational
1983–1999 Nabisco Dinah Shore
2000–2001 Nabisco Championship
2002–2014 Kraft Nabisco Championship
2015–present ANA Inspiration
Informally, it is commonly referred to as "the Dinah Shore,"
even though her name was removed from the official title in 2000.
The winner's trophy bears Shore's name.

"Poppie's Pond"[edit]

Since 1988, the winner traditionally celebrates her victory by jumping in the pond surrounding the 18th green.[8] The pond is known as Champions Lake or "Poppie's Pond" as it was dubbed in 2006 honor of Terry Wilcox, the tournament director from 1994 through 2008; Wilcox is known as "Poppie" to his grandchildren.[9]

Amy Alcott started the practice 30 years ago in 1988 to celebrate her second win here,[10] and repeated in 1991, including tournament host Dinah Shore.[11] It was not embraced by others until 1994, when Donna Andrews made the leap, followed by Nanci Bowen the next year, and it became an annual tradition.[12][13] In 1998, winner Pat Hurst waded in only up to her knees, as she could not swim.[14][15][16][17]

Originally a very natural water hazard, the portion near the bridge it is now lined with concrete and has treated water, more like a swimming pool.

Lesbian tourist destination[edit]

The tournament has become a popular tourist destination for some lesbians and bisexual women, drawing thousands of lesbian spectators each year to the golf events and associated parties.[18][19][20] It has been referred to as "spring break for lesbians."[21][22]

Winners[edit]

Year Dates Champion Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Purse
($)
Winner's
share ($)
2018 Mar 29 – Apr 2 ^ Pernilla Lindberg  Sweden 65-67-70-71 273 −15 Playoff 2,800,000 420,000
2017 Mar 30 – Apr 2 Ryu So-yeon  South Korea 68-69-69-68 274 −14 Playoff 2,700,000 405,000
2016 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Lydia Ko  New Zealand 70-68-69-69 276 −12 1 stroke 2,600,000 390,000
2015 Apr 2–5 Brittany Lincicome (2)  United States 72-68-70-69 279 −9 Playoff 2,500,000 375,000
2014 Apr 3–6 Lexi Thompson  United States 73-64-69-68 274 −14 3 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2013 Apr 4–7 Inbee Park  South Korea 70-67-67-69 273 −15 4 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2012 Mar 29 – Apr 1 Sun-Young Yoo  South Korea 69-69-72-69 279 −9 Playoff 2,000,000 300,000
2011 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Stacy Lewis  United States 66-69-71-69 275 −13 3 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2010 Apr 1–4 Yani Tseng  Taiwan 69-71-67-68 275 −13 1 stroke 2,000,000 300,000
2009 Apr 2–5 Brittany Lincicome  United States 66-74-70-69 279 −9 1 stroke 2,000,000 300,000
2008 Apr 3–6 Lorena Ochoa  Mexico 68-71-71-67 277 −11 5 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2007 Mar 29 – Apr 1 Morgan Pressel  United States 74-72-70-69 285 −3 1 stroke 2,000,000 300,000
2006 Mar 30 – Apr 2 Karrie Webb (2)  Australia 70-68-76-65 279 −9 Playoff 1,800,000 270,000
2005 Mar 24–27 Annika Sörenstam (3)  Sweden 70-69-66-68 273 −15 8 strokes 1,800,000 270,000
2004 Mar 25–28 Grace Park  South Korea 72-69-67-69 277 −11 1 stroke 1,600,000 240,000
2003 Mar 27–30 Patricia Meunier-Lebouc  France 70-68-70-73 281 −7 1 stroke 1,600,000 240,000
2002 Mar 28–31 Annika Sörenstam (2)  Sweden 70-71-71-68 280 −8 1 stroke 1,500,000 225,000
2001 Mar 22–25 Annika Sörenstam  Sweden 72-70-70-69 281 −7 3 strokes 1,500,000 225,000
2000 Mar 23–26 Karrie Webb  Australia 67-70-67-70 274 −14 10 strokes 1,250,000 187,500
1999 Mar 25–28 Dottie Pepper (2)  United States 70-66-67-66 269 −19 6 strokes 1,000,000 150,000
1998 Mar 26–29 Pat Hurst  United States 68-72-70-71 281 −7 1 stroke 1,000,000 150,000
1997 Mar 27–30 Betsy King (3)  United States 71-67-67-71 276 −12 2 strokes 900,000 135,000
1996 Mar 28–31 Patty Sheehan  United States 71-72-67-71 281 −7 1 stroke 900,000 135,000
1995 Mar 23–26 Nanci Bowen  United States 69-75-71-70 285 −3 1 stroke 850,000 127,500
1994 Mar 24–27 Donna Andrews  United States 70-69-67-70 276 −12 2 strokes 700,000 105,000
1993 Mar 25–28 Helen Alfredsson  Sweden 69-71-72-72 284 −4 2 strokes 700,000 105,000
1992 Mar 26–29 Dottie Mochrie  United States 69-71-70-69 279 −9 Playoff 700,000 105,000
1991 Mar 28–31 Amy Alcott (3)  United States 67-70-68-68 273 −15 8 strokes 600,000 90,000
1990 Mar 29 – Apr 1 Betsy King (2)  United States 69-70-69-75 283 −5 2 strokes 600,000 90,000
1989 Mar 30 – Apr 2 Juli Inkster (2)  United States 66-69-73-71 279 −9 5 strokes 500,000 80,000
1988 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Amy Alcott (2)  United States 71-66-66-71 274 −14 2 strokes 500,000 80,000
1987 Apr 2–5 Betsy King  United States 68-75-72-68 283 −5 Playoff 500,000 80,000
1986 Apr 3–6 Pat Bradley  United States 68-72-69-71 280 −8 2 strokes 430,000 75,000
1985 Apr 4–7 Alice Miller  United States 70-68-70-67 275 −13 3 strokes 400,000 55,000
1984 Apr 5–8 Juli Inkster  United States 70-73-69-68 280 −8 Playoff 400,000 55,000
1983 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Amy Alcott  United States 70-70-70-72 282 −6 2 strokes 400,000 55,000

^ Play extended one day due to darkness.
Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.

Winners as a non-major[edit]

Year Champion Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Purse
($)
Winner's
share ($)
1982 Sally Little  South Africa 76-67-71-64 278 −10 3 strokes 300,000 45,000
1981 Nancy Lopez  United States 71-73-69-64 277 −11 2 strokes 250,000 37,500
1980 Donna Caponi  United States 71-67-66-71 275 −13 2 strokes 250,000 37,500
1979 Sandra Post (2)  Canada 68-70-68-70 276 −12 1 stroke 250,000 37,500
1978 Sandra Post  Canada 65-75-72-72 283 −5 Playoff 240,000 36,000
1977 Kathy Whitworth  United States 76-70-72-71 289 +1 1 stroke 240,000 36,000
1976 Judy Rankin  United States 74-72-71-68 285 −3 3 strokes 185,000 32,000
1975 Sandra Palmer  United States 70-70-70-73 283 −5 1 stroke 180,000 32,000
1974 Jo Ann Prentice  United States 71-71-74-73 289 +1 Playoff 179,000 32,000
1973 Mickey Wright  United States 71-74-71-68 284 −4 2 strokes 135,000 25,000
1972 Jane Blalock  United States 71-70-72 213 −3 3 strokes 110,000 20,050

Multiple champions[edit]

Multiple winners of the event as a major championship.

Champion Country Total Years
Amy Alcott  United States 3 1983, 1988, 1991
Betsy King  United States 3 1987, 1990, 1997
Annika Sörenstam  Sweden 3 2001, 2002, 2005
Juli Inkster  United States 2 1984, 1989
Dottie Pepper  United States 2 1992, 1999
Karrie Webb  Australia 2 2000, 2006
Brittany Lincicome  United States 2 2009, 2015
Grand Slam winners ‡

Through 2018, the only successful defense of the title (as a major) was by Sörenstam in 2002.[23]

Champions by nationality[edit]

Major titles in this event, by nationality.

Nationality Wins
 United States 21
 Sweden 5
 South Korea 4
 Australia 2
 France 1
 Mexico 1
 Taiwan 1
 New Zealand 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McDermott, Barry (April 29, 1974). "One for the money, two for the show". Sports Illustrated. p. 26.
  2. ^ Pileggi, Sarah (April 12, 1982). "The way to win a lot with a Little". Sports Illustrated. p. 32.
  3. ^ a b c d McDermott, Barry (April 24, 1972). "Bracing for a rich breakthrough". Sports Illustrated. p. 26.
  4. ^ McDermott, Barry (April 11, 1983). "Winning was her just dessert". Sports Illustrated. p. 34.
  5. ^ "All Nippon Airways (ANA) Takes Flight as Title Sponsor of LPGA's "ANA Inspiration"". IMG. 2014-11-18. Archived from the original on 2014-12-01. Retrieved 2014-11-19.
  6. ^ "Rankin maintains lead". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). wire services. April 16, 1972. p. 3C.
  7. ^ "Blalock wins title despite back pain". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. April 17, 1972. p. 5B.
  8. ^ "LPGA Top Ten: Leaps into Poppie's Pond". YouTube. (LPGA Tour). 2015. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  9. ^ "Clear Water Awaits 2006 Kraft Nabisco Champion". LPGA. April 2, 2006. Retrieved April 2, 2007.[dead link]
  10. ^ "Alcott takes Dinah Shore, then takes victory plunge". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. April 4, 1988. p. 2C.
  11. ^ Florence, Mal (April 1, 1991). "Alcott repeats her win and her dive". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (Los Angeles Times}. p. 2C.
  12. ^ "Bowen's first LPGA victory a major one". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. March 27, 1995. p. 2B.
  13. ^ Crouse, Karen (April 2, 2011). "At women's Masters, plunge in Poppie's Pond is victory lap". New York Times. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  14. ^ "Win has Hurst taking a plunge". Reading Eagle. (Pennsylvania). wire services. March 30, 1998. p. B10.
  15. ^ Shipnuck, Alan (April 6, 1998). "Hurst in a burst". Sports Illustrated. p. G38.
  16. ^ Zullo, Allan (2001). Astonishing but True Golf Facts. Andrews McMeel Publishing. ISBN 978-0740714269.
  17. ^ "The Ladies of the Lake: the Champion's Leap at the Kraft Nabisco Championship". Kraft Nabisco Championship. 2006. Archived from the original on April 1, 2007. Retrieved April 2, 2007.
  18. ^ Mansfield, Stephanie (April 7, 1997). "Major party". Sports Illustrated. p. G6.
  19. ^ "Tee party". The Observer. May 6, 2001. Archived from the original on May 24, 2013. Retrieved April 3, 2013.
  20. ^ Fustich, Katie (April 7, 2017). "Makin a real splash!". Daily Mail. (London, England).
  21. ^ "Don't Quote Me: Dinah Shore Weekend". AfterEllen.com. 2006. Archived from the original on July 19, 2012. Retrieved December 12, 2007.
  22. ^ Downs, Maggie (March 28, 2010). "Dinah Shore events part of celebration that began with a round of golf". The Desert Sun.[dead link]
  23. ^ "Sorenstam holds on for victory". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). Associated Press. April 1, 2002. p. 5C.
  24. ^ "Lopez succumbs to challenge by Post". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. April 9, 1979. p. 14.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°47′53″N 116°25′59″W / 33.798°N 116.433°W / 33.798; -116.433