National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Issues

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National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Issues
Awarded by Directorate of Film Festivals
Type National
Category Indian Cinema
Description
Description Best feature film on Social Issues such as Prohibition, Women and Child Welfare, Anti-dowry, Drug Abuse, Welfare of the Handicapped etc. for a year
Medal Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
Statistics
Instituted 1984
First awarded 1984
Last awarded 2016
Total awarded 36
Cash award 50,000 (US$780)
First awardee(s) Accident
Last awardee(s) Pink

The National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Issues is one of the category in the National Film Awards presented annually by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organization set up by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India. It is one of several awards presented for feature films and is awarded with Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus).

The National Film Awards were established in 1954 to "encourage production of the films of a high aesthetic and technical standard and educational and culture value" and also planned to included awards for regional films.[1][2] In 1984, at the 32nd National Film Awards various new categories were instituted for Swarna Kamal and Rajat Kamal. Categories like the Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Costume Design along with the Best Film on Other Social Issues were introduced for the Rajat Kamal. This category was introduced to be awarded annually for films produced in the year across the country, in all Indian languages. As of 2016 since its inception, the award has been present thirty-three times to thirty-six films. It has been presented for films in seven languages with the highest being twelve in Hindi, followed by nine in Malayalam, five in Tamil, four in Marathi, three in Bengali, two in Kannada and one in Telugu. It was not presented on two occasion in 1985 (33rd ceremony) and 2011 (59th ceremony).[3][4]

The inaugural award was conferred upon production banner Sanket (Rajat Kamal and 30,000) and director Shankar Nag (Rajat Kamal and 15,000) for their Kannada film Accident for dealing with the bold topic of whistleblowing against political corruption and dealing with bad effects of alcoholism.[5] On five occasion the award was shared by two films: in 1987 by Tamil films Ore Oru Gramathiley and Vedham Pudhithu, in 1993 by Janani (Bengali) and Naaraayam (Malayalam), in 1994 by Wheelchair (Bengali) and Parinayam (Malayalam), in 2000 by Munnudi (Kannada) and Vetri Kodi Kattu (Tamil), and in 2003 by Hindi films Koi... Mil Gaya and Gangaajal. The most recent recipient of the award, the production banner Rashmi Sharma Telefilms Limited and director Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury, have received Rajat Kamal and 1,50,000 each for their Hindi courtroom drama film Pink.[6] The film discusses the social issue of crimes against women and political meddling in a court case.[7]

Winners[edit]

The award includes 'Rajat Kamal' (Silver Lotus) and cash prize to the producers and director each. The first award in 1984 had a monetary association of 30,000 to the producers and 15,000 to the directors.[5] In 1995 at the 43rd award ceremony the Marathi film Doghi was honoured and the cash prices were revised to 30,000 each presented to the director duo Sumitra Bhave–Sunil Sukthankar and co-producers National Film Development Corporation of India (NFDC) and Doordarshan.[8] The monetary association was again revised to 1,50,000 to both the producers and directors in 2006 at the 54th ceremony where producer Policherla Venkata Subbiah and director Satish Kasetty's Telugu film Hope was the winner.[9] This has remained same as of 2016.[6]

Indicates a joint award for that year

Following are the award winners over the years:

List of films, showing the year (award ceremony), language(s), producer(s), director(s) and citation
Year Film(s) Language(s) Producer(s) Director(s) Citation Refs.
1984
(32nd)
Accident Kannada Sanket Shankar Nag  – [5]
1985
(33rd)
No Award [3]
1986
(34th)
Doore Doore Oru Koodu Koottam Malayalam M. Mani Sibi Malayil [10]
1987
(35th)
Ore Oru Gramathiley Tamil S. Rangarajan Jyothipandian [11]
1987
(35th)
Vedham Pudhithu Tamil Janani Arts Creations P. Bharathiraja
1988
(36th)
Main Zinda Hoon Hindi NFDC and Doordarshan Sudhir Mishra [12]
1989
(37th)
Unnikuttanu Joli Kitty Malayalam V. R. Gopinath V. R. Gopinath [13]
1990
(38th)
Oru Veedu Iru Vasal Tamil Kavithalayaa Productions K. Balachander [14]
1991
(39th)
Yamanam Malayalam Ajayan Varicolil Bharath Gopi [15]
1992
(40th)
Neenga Nalla Irukkanum Tamil G. V. Films Visu [16]
1993
(41st)
Janani Bengali Sanat Dasgupta Sanat Dasgupta [17]
1993
(41st)
Naaraayam Malayalam Raju Pilakat Sasi Shankar
1994
(42nd)
Parinayam Malayalam G. P. Vijayakumar Hariharan [18]
1994
(42nd)
Wheelchair Bengali NFDC Tapan Sinha
1995
(43rd)
Doghi Marathi NFDC and Doordarshan Sumitra Bhave and Sunil Sukathnkar [8]
1996
(44th)
Tamanna Hindi Pooja Bhatt Mahesh Bhatt [19]
1997
(45th)
Dhanna Hindi Films Division Deepak Roy [20]
1998
(46th)
Chinthavishtayaya Shyamala Malayalam C. Karunakaran Sreenivasan [21]
1999
(47th)
Kairee Hindi Government of India Amol Palekar [22]
2000
(48th)
Vetri Kodi Kattu Tamil D. Pandian Cheran [23]
2000
(48th)
Munnudi Kannada Navachitra P. Sheshadri
2001
(49th)
Chandni Bar Hindi Lata Mohan Iyer Madhur Bhandarkar [24]
2002
(50th)
Swaraaj Hindi George Mathew Anwar Jamal [25]
2003
(51st)
Koi... Mil Gaya Hindi Rakesh Roshan Rakesh Roshan [26]
2003
(51st)
Gangaajal Hindi Prakash Jha Prakash Jha
2004
(52nd)
Perumazhakkalam Malayalam Salim Padiyath Kamal [27]
2005
(53rd)
Iqbal Hindi Subhash Ghai Nagesh Kukunoor [28]
2006
(54th)
Hope Telugu Policherla Venkata Subbiah Satish Kasetty [9]
2007
(55th)
Antardwand Hindi Sushil Rajpal Sushil Rajpal [29]
2008
(56th)
Jogwa Marathi Shripal Morakhia Rajeev Patil [30]
2009
(57th)
Well Done Abba Hindi Reliance Big Pictures Shyam Benegal [31]
2010
(58th)
Champions Marathi Aishwarya Narkar Ramesh More [32]
2011
(59th)
No Award [4]
2012
(60th)
Spirit Malayalam M. J. Antony Renjith [33]
2013
(61st)
Tuhya Dharma Koncha Marathi Indian Magic Eye Motion Pictures Pvt Ltd. Satish Manwar [34]
2014
(62nd)
Chotoder Chobi Bengali Shree Venkatesh Films Kaushik Ganguly [35]
2015
(63rd)
Nirnayakam Malayalam Jairaj Films V. K. Prakash [36]
2016
(64th)
Pink Hindi Rashmi Sharma Telefilms Limited Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1st National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  2. ^ "1st National Film Awards (PDF)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  3. ^ a b "33rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "59th National Film Awards for the Year 2011 Announced". Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c "32nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 6, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c "64th National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  7. ^ "'Pink' bags National Award for Best Film on Social Issues". Business Standard. 7 April 2017. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  8. ^ a b "43rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "54th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  10. ^ "34th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  11. ^ "35th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  12. ^ "36th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  13. ^ "37th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  14. ^ "38th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  15. ^ "39th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved February 27, 2012. 
  16. ^ "40th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 2, 2012. 
  17. ^ "41st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 3, 2012. 
  18. ^ "42nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 5, 2012. 
  19. ^ "44th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  20. ^ "45th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 11, 2012. 
  21. ^ "46th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 12, 2012. 
  22. ^ "47th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 13, 2012. 
  23. ^ "48th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 13, 2012. 
  24. ^ "49th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  25. ^ "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  26. ^ "51st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 15, 2012. 
  27. ^ "52nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  28. ^ "53rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 19, 2012. 
  29. ^ "55th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 26, 2012. 
  30. ^ "56th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 27, 2012. 
  31. ^ "57th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 28, 2012. 
  32. ^ "58th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 29, 2012. 
  33. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 18 March 2013. 
  34. ^ "61st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. 16 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  35. ^ "62nd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  36. ^ "63rd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 28 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016. 

External links[edit]