Scott Talbot-Cameron

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Scott Talbot-Cameron
Personal information
Full nameScott Thomas Talbot-Cameron
Nationality Australia
Born (1981-07-13) 13 July 1981 (age 37)
Canberra, Australia
RelativesDon Talbot (father)
Jan Cameron (mother)
Sport
SportSwimming
StrokesBackstroke

Scott Talbot-Cameron (born 13 July 1981) is an Australian-born two-time Olympic and national record holding backstroke swimmer for New Zealand. He swam for New Zealand at the 2000 and 2004 Olympics.[1]

Talbot-Cameron also swam at the:[2]

At the 2003 Student Games, he was the swimming team captain and broke the National Record in the 100m backstroke in finishing 5th.

Talbot-Cameron is the son of former Australian head coach Don Talbot and Jan Cameron (née Murphy), who was the New Zealand head coach and Australian 1964 Tokyo Olympics silver medalist. Born in Canberra, Australia, he followed his parents to Canada, then back to Australia, then moved with his mother to New Zealand at the age of ten.[3] He attended Rosmini College in Auckland and Auburn University in the US state of Alabama, and graduated from Massey University in Albany, New Zealand with a BA in Psychology.[4][5]

Talbot-Cameron began coaching swimming professionally at North Shore Swim Club in 2003, from junior through to senior levels, and was a New Zealand national coach in the High Performance Centre based in the Millennium Institute in Auckland.[6] In 2013 he became senior coach for the swimming team at the University of Sydney.[7] He attended the 2012 London Olympics as a national coach for New Zealand.[8]

In 2013, he moved back to Australia to work as the Head Middle Distance Coach at the University of Sydney, and in 2016 he was appointed as the High Performance Coach at the Nunawading Swimming Club in Melbourne.[9][10]

Talbot-Cameron married Lucy Taylor in 2014.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Profile at the New Zealand's Commonwealth Games team website
  2. ^ Talbot-Cameron bio from Swimming New Zealand; retrieved 2009-07-07.
  3. ^ McFadden, Suzanne (17 August 2010). "Swimming: Born to coach". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 31 January 2015.
  4. ^ "Swimming to Success" (PDF). Sursum Corda. Summer 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 April 2013. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  5. ^ "NCAA Div. I Men: No. 1 Longhorns Stick No. 4 Auburn". Swimming World Magazine. 12 January 2001. Retrieved 31 January 2015.
  6. ^ Johannsen, Dana (4 January 2008). "Swimming: Palmer surges ahead". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 7 November 2011.
  7. ^ "New Zealand's Scott Talbot Moving to Australia". Swimming World Magazine. 4 December 2012. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  8. ^ Bertrand, Kelly (30 July 2012). "Jan Cameron and Scott Talbot-Cameron: 'We're backing the Kiwis'". New Zealand Woman's Weekly. Archived from the original on 9 August 2012. Retrieved 31 January 2015.
  9. ^ "Scott Talbot to join Nunawading Coaching Team". Nunawading Swimming Club. 16 June 2016. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  10. ^ "Coaches". Nunawading Swimming Club. Retrieved 8 January 2019.