Talk:Elizabeth of Hungary

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Biography / Royalty and Nobility (Rated B-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Royalty and Nobility (marked as Low-importance).
 
WikiProject Saints (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Saints, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Saints and other individuals commemorated in Christian liturgical calendars on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Hungary (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Hungary, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Hungary on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Women's History (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Women's History, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Women's history and related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Royalty discussion[edit]

Elizabeth of hungary was a princess

Place of Birth[edit]

The place of birth is more probably the royal castle in Pressburg (Pozsony) in Kingdom of Hungary (now Bratislava, Slovakia). There are 2 churches devoted to St. Elisabeth i n Bratislava.

There is no authority for any birthplace--the acsription of Bratislava is in fact NOT traditional, and I will remove it. The traditional place is invariably given as the castle in Sarospatak, but all scholars who write on this topic seem aware that this is a late medieval, perhaps early modern tradition. Drmies (talk) 03:12, 27 November 2008 (UTC)

July 7, 1207?[edit]

Is there such a birth date as "July 7, 1207"? From what I can tell, all Internet resources say "1207" as her birth year, but they have no mention of "July 7, 1207" anywhere. --Angeldeb82 (talk) 23:43, 16 November 2008 (UTC)

greatest woman of the German middle ages?[edit]

I've removed this unsourced statement. First of all, it makes no sense that someone in 1235 would speak of the 'middle ages.' Second, we do not have Gregory's words preserved--after looking through a dozen biographies, none of whom mention this phrase, I found confirmation of my suspicion in the impeccably academic Sankt Elisabeth: Furstin, Dienerin, Heilige (Sigmaringen: Thorbecke, 1981), in the first essay, "Die zeitgenossische Uberlieferung zur heiligen Elisabeth," by Paul Gerhard Schmidt, on p. 4.

After a look on the Catholic Encyclopedia article I see what happened: someone misread the relevant sentence there and placed something different (but using almost the same words!) on Wikipedia. Pfff. Drmies (talk) 03:44, 27 November 2008 (UTC)

Oh, they did speak of the Middle Ages in 1235 or at least some decades after, but in that case, they would have ended with Frederick Barabarossa's death or the like. Just the same, I'm somewhat old-school in saying that the Middle Ages ended with the Reformation, but there are already those who will have it ended in 1806, and let's wait for some decades, some will probably have it ended in 1989. --84.154.106.75 (talk) 08:40, 30 October 2010 (UTC)

Image copyright problem with File:Germany 2007 10 euro Elizabeth Obverse.jpg[edit]

The image File:Germany 2007 10 euro Elizabeth Obverse.jpg is used in this article under a claim of fair use, but it does not have an adequate explanation for why it meets the requirements for such images when used here. In particular, for each page the image is used on, it must have an explanation linking to that page which explains why it needs to be used on that page. Please check

  • That there is a non-free use rationale on the image's description page for the use in this article.
  • That this article is linked to from the image description page.

This is an automated notice by FairuseBot. For assistance on the image use policy, see Wikipedia:Media copyright questions. --19:16, 4 January 2009 (UTC)

A sermon printed in 1497 by the Franciscan Osvaldus de Lasco, a church official in Hungary, is the first to name Sárospatak as the saint's birthplace, perhaps building on local tradition. The veracity of this account is not without reproach: Osvaldus also transforms the miracle of the roses (see below) to Elizabeth's childhood in Sárospatak, and has her leave Hungary at the age of five.[6]

According to more contemporary and very trustworthy sources, Elizabeth left Hungary at the age of four, to become betrothed to Ludwig IV of Thuringia. Some have suggested that Ludwig's brother Hermann was in fact the eldest, and that she was first betrothed to him until his death in 1232, but this is doubtful. An event of this magnitude would almost certainly be mentioned at least once in the many original sources at our disposal, and this is not the case. Rather, the 14th-century "Cronica Reinhardsbrunnensis" specifically names Hermann as the second son. In addition, the only contemporary document (dated May 29, 1214) that might support Hermann's claim to be the eldest by putting his name before Ludwig's relates to a monastery in Hesse. This, it has been suggested, actually supports the claim that Hermann was the younger of the two, as Hesse was traditionally the domain of the second son, and thus it would be normal that his name be mentioned first, as this document deals with his territory.[7]

In 1221, at the age of fourteen, Elizabeth married Ludwig; the same year he was crowned Ludwig IV, and the marriage appears to have been happy. In 1223, Franciscan monks arrived, and the teenage Elzsabeth not only learned about the ideals of Francis of Assisi, but started to live them. Ludwig was not upset by his wife's charitable efforts, believing that the distribution of his wealth to the poor would bring eternal reward; he is venerated in Thuringia as a saint (without being canonized by the Church, unlike his wife).

It was also about this time that the priest and later inquisitor Konrad von Marburg--a harsh man--gained considerable power over Elizabeth, when he was appointed as her confessor.

In the spring of 1226, when floods, famine, and plague wrought havoc in Thuringia, Ludwig, a staunch supporter of the Hohenstaufen Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, represented Frederick II at the Reichstag (Imperial Diet) in Cremona. Elizabeth assumed control of affairs and distributed alms in all parts of their territory, even giving away state robes and ornaments to the poor. Below the Wartburg Castle, she built a hospital with twenty-eight beds and visited the inmates daily to attend to them.

Elizabeth's life changed irrevocably on September 11, 1227 when Ludwig, en route to join the Sixth Crusade, died of the plague in Otranto, Italy. His remains were returned to Elisabeth in 1228 and deposited in Reinhardsbrunn; on hearing the news of her husband's death, Elisabeth is reported to have said, "He is dead. He is dead. It is to me as if the whole world died today."[8]

Elizabeth vs Elisabeth[edit]

The translation of the Hungarian form is Elizabeth. The Elisabeth form is only German and French. Now which one is more important her birth country or her husband's country? Should we move this to Elizabeth of Hungary instead?--Queen Elizabeth II's Little Spy (talk) 17:43, 29 May 2011 (UTC) lol!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1111 :)))))))))))))))) xDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD yooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!1 :P — Preceding unsigned comment added by 49.147.56.223 (talk) 14:39, 22 June 2015 (UTC)

WP: Women's History Assessment Commentary[edit]

The article was assessed C-class, for lack of sufficient in-line citations. Boneyard90 (talk) 13:06, 14 February 2012 (UTC)

wow![edit]

that's really cool! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.7.196.38 (talk) 12:15, 25 October 2012 (UTC)