Talk:Rain

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Good articleRain has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
February 1, 2010Good article nomineeListed
February 19, 2010Peer reviewReviewed
Current status: Good article


Notes[edit]

what about these rains of fish and frogs? what article would talk about them? - Omegatron 16:19, Oct 22, 2004 (UTC)

What an awesome page - this is one of my favs. Not least because of the beautiful photography of course, but the article is really top notch. I love rain. --?

What speed does rain fall at?

All things fall roughly at 9 meters per second.
Err no... All things accelerate at around 9.81 m/s, the terminal velocity is determined by air resistance amongst other things.--Shastrix 15:19, 4 March 2007 (UTC)

Is rain water usually potable? --TheSimkin 16:58, August 7, 2005 (UTC)

I think so,? but I'm not sure...search around a bit :D —CliffHarris (-T|C-) 01:43, 19 March 2006 (UTC)
There is no guarantee that rain water will be potable. Strong winds, especially those associated with storm cells can trap material from the earth's surface including soil, dirt, small animals and fish, sea-salts etc. all or any of which can then fall as rain. Calm weather convection rain and rain associated with wet trade winds are probably of a quality suitable for drinking but this can never be guaranteed. Concerns about the acidity of acid rain affecting potablility are almost certainly misplaced. The ionic concentration of Acid rain is so low that despite the very low pH there would be no adverse impacts from drinking such water.
In the 1960s when aircraft were allowed to discharge their seweage waste into the atmosphere, there were some recorded occurrences of Cholera transmitted via rainfall (I'll try and find the reference)
Velela 08:44, 18 May 2006 (UTC)

How about artificial rain?

i've heard that sometimes clouds are "moved out" (on parade days, for example) to guarantee that there will be no rain.

On the other hand, i've also heard about "ordering" rain, to compensate in case of too much dust in the air. Thank you in advance for the response, JAUI (25 April 2006)

There are cloud seeding services available--you can pay light aircraft to spray silver iodide dust that (theoretically) can nucleate clouds and cause rain.
Cloud removal I haven't heard of. Clouds only seem to move in response to winds and temperature/pressure variations--possibly you could focus a lot of heat skyward to push them away, but that would be a LOT of heat. Possibly someone's been selling "rain removal services" ... but I'm not sure how scientifically based that is. Even the usefulness of cloud seeding--a semi-well studied technique--is still up in the air.JDowning 18:44, 25 April 2006 (UTC)

rain vs showers[edit]

What is the difference between "showers" and "rain" as reported by meterologists? I have heard that the former is intermittent and the latter is constant, but also that the former is caused by cumulus clouds and the latter by "strato?" clouds. Which is the true definition? --Mintie 28 June 2005 23:08 (UTC)

Definition here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/features/basics_rain.shtml This should probably be included in the article.78.86.67.45 (talk) 21:26, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

That is true. Much like when people take a shower, the water turns on and off. When it rains, it rains continuously. That's why meteorologists say that we will have on and off showers throughout the day, as opposed to on and off rain. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Innocent3d (talkcontribs) 17:36, 3 June 2010 (UTC) i do not know but it ℛains 65.175.134.44 (talk) 19:09, 20 January 2011 (UTC)

We often think of rain as it is "not raining" or "raining". I propose that there are phases between "not raining" and "raining" which may be described as follows. The Threat of Rain (TOR) is when there are rain drops at such infrequency or sparsity that one is able to walk in between or avoid them striking you. Not Yet Rain (NYR) is when the intensity rain drops are more than Threat of Rain (TOR), i.e. one can no longer avoid them, but there are still visible patches of dry ground. Raining (R) is the point just after Not Yet Rain (NYR) when there are no longer visible patches of dry ground.Thubendran (talk) 23:57, 24 April 2014 (UTC)

Interesting theory , but not appropriate for Wikipedia as it appears to be original research. But thanks anyway.  Velella  Velella Talk   08:15, 25 April 2014 (UTC)

why it rains mostly in the afternoon ![edit]

Where I live, there are frequent thunderstorms that occur during the day. But why does it occur mostly in the late afternoon (starting around 5-6pm)and then clears up.

Because of low atmospheric pressure?78.16.222.28 (talk) 15:07, 18 October 2008 (UTC)

Removed from page for discussion[edit]

I've removed the recently added note:

The formation of rain droplets from vapour in the atmosphere can be modelled using simplified applications of Jamesworth Pilley's molar gas theorem, which also makes use of the notable chemists' constant.

as it is unsourced, and Google search returns a total of one hit on Jamesworth Pilley - and that is to another wiki article. - Vsmith 16:41, 12 January 2006 (UTC)

About the picture[edit]

The picture of rainfall in the top-right corner - is it real? Sure looks like a photoshop tutorial.. Well, anyway it sort of displays rain..(Henningklevjer 15:37, 24 June 2006 (UTC))

Rain drop picture[edit]

Can someone please change the rain drop picture. The picture shows drop after it has bounced back, so the shape is not correct. Usual rain drops are not spherical, because of the shear forces acting on them. YashKochar 20:18, 4 September 2006 (UTC)

Stream Rain[edit]

This article only documents rain in droplet form. However, it is known(especially near the equator) to fall in streams(like your shower) or even what looks like a solid wall of water(torrential rain). Why are neither of these types of rain documented? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 12.197.249.26 (talkcontribs) 10:50, 3 December 2006 (UTC). Erm, Hey, I did ask this question for a reason. DUR.

Liquids tend to separate in droplets when they fall. If you pay attention to a shower you will see that the streams are in fact compound of multiple droplets. The solid wall of water sounds extremely unlikely to me; perhaps it's what they have in Atlantis?--cloviz 04:08, 15 January 2007 (UTC)
No the solid wall of water isn't actually a solid wall of water, but rather it appears as one. What he is talking about is real and is commonly referred to as torrential rain, or monsoon(yes I'm aware this isn't the only use for the term monsoon). From a distance, it looks like a tornado, but it isn't. Up close, it looks like there's nothing but water around you. An example long distance image is this:

http://www.peoriaaz.com/emergency/images/monsoon.jpg

Also, can you get very hot rain, perhaps even scalding rain? The snare (talk) 23:18, 8 February 2011 (UTC)

Poly water[edit]

Water forming chains after lightning? Can we have a source for this please? Mullet 21:29, 12 December 2006 (UTC)

--Yes, it's called the laws of physics.

Removed:

Rain is said to be heavier immediately after a bolt of lightning. The cause of this phenomenon is traceable to the bipolar aspect of the water molecule. The intense electric and magnetic field generated by a lightning bolt forces many of the water molecules in the air surrounding the stroke to line up. These molecules then spontaneously create localized chains of water (similar to nylon or other polymers). These chains then form water droplets when the electric/magnetic field is removed. These drops then fall as intensified rain.

for is said to be weaseliness. If it is laws of physics then provide a source. Vsmith 12:54, 2 January 2007 (UTC)

Scientific name for people who like rain[edit]

Can anyone tell me what the scientific name is for a person who likes the rain? I know there is one!

Pluviophile. —Herbee 01:31, 13 January 2007 (UTC)

-Um I'm pretty sure only white cultures have negative conotations with rain...liking rain is the norm in most parts of the world. This is like asking for a word for people who like sunshine... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.31.142.138 (talk) 18:23, 6 June 2008 (UTC)

Eliophile ?

Measurement accuracy[edit]

The amount of rainfall […] can be measured to the nearest 0.27 mm or 0.01 in.

Nobody in their right mind would round a measurement "to the nearest 0.27 mm"? And besides, 0.01 inch is 0.254 mm, not 0.27 mm. At least in Western Europe, meteorological services report and forecast rainfall with a 0.1 mm accuracy. See this rain gauge at KNMI, for instance.
Herbee 01:29, 13 January 2007 (UTC)

Regarding "amount of precipitation"

   "light rain — when the amount of precipitation is between 250 mm - 750 mm (250 liter/m² - 750 liter/m²)"
    [and all other amounts, also]

I think perhaps decimal points are missing from the figures. For instance, in the above example, < 250mm - 750mm is roughly equal to 10 - 29 inches of rain, for light rain. Perhaps the correct figure is 2.50mm - 7.50mm ? SueNami 20:46, 20 April 2007 (UTC)

Maybe the measurement lies on / is relevant to a certain time period. It is not the same: 200 l/m2 in hour and 200 l/m2 in a day. --16:47, 10 May 2007 (UTC) Phips
Yes, these numbers do not make sense - a common measure would be for a 24hr period, but these figure look roughly like annual figures. I've changed them to numbers from a real journal, and that are per hour, but I don't know the standard to do references, so my reference may be a bit non-standard :-) - can someone check this? --Rob

Classifying the amount of rain

Why the cited website is taken as an authority? Seems very unprofessional. Also, I've been searching for a proper classification and I do not find a consensus: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/uk/guide/key.html#radar http://www.bom.gov.au/info/wwords/#RAIN Also, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heavy_rain_(meteorology) gives another amount in mm for a heavy rain (not the same as in this wikipedia article) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.43.234.103 (talk) 22:59, 13 October 2008 (UTC)

Falling Water?[edit]

There was a number of edits that stated that rain is "falling water". These were removed, but for what reason? Is rain not water that is falling? I belive this should be mention somewhere in said artilce

Falling water can also mean water fall which is definitely not rain.

I think this page renders incorrectly[edit]

Under the firefox 1.5.0.9 —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 129.9.163.233 (talk) 23:34, 12 February 2007 (UTC).

WHAT IS PLEASENT SMELL CAUSED BY RAIN DROPS CALLED?[edit]

What is the name given to the pleasant smell that is caused by the fall of the first few raindrops on dry earth?

I believe you are looking for the word petrichor. It is specifically related to the smell of rain after a hot/dry period, or rain falling on dry earth. - Oxford Dictionaries — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.222.205.99 (talk) 17:05, 18 August 2015 (UTC)

Gee, you make me want to go outside and smell the lawn now. -Uagehry456talk 20:51, 28 June 2007 (UTC)

Gee I love it too :D Amit 12:35, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Most likely it's the simple moistening of the dirt. Similar to how you can smell oil on the road much stronger when it first starts raining. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.197.249.26 (talk) 17:21, August 24, 2007 (UTC)

This should help HowStuffWorks - What causes the smell after rain? you. Possible that it could be added to the article. Bidgee (talk) 15:09, 7 April 2008 (UTC)

It's OZONE. It smells kind of like a cross between "dirt" and burning hair... but has a strangely fresh smell... A very thin layer of water hits hot asphalt, rocks or something else warmer that the rain water (the smell is the most distinct when hosing down hot asphalt on a summer day). A short term chemical reaction takes place and ozone is released for a short time. I used to work in a factory making ozone generators. I know the smell of ozone. Sorry mythbustes, wrong yet again. 71.49.217.230 (talk) 01:28, 8 August 2014 (UTC)

Rain in Kolkata is not fo real[edit]

Pretty sure the picture "Rain in Kolkata" is from the movie City of Joy, thus it's probably not in the public domain and probably not even real rain (if that matters). If someone can confirm, it should be removed, right? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Catxk (talkcontribs) 07:08, 7 February 2008 (UTC) hi dude.............Bold text'''Italic text —Preceding unsigned comment added by 117.192.142.160 (talk) 16:55, 29 July 2009 (UTC)

Rain contains B12[edit]

I read somewhere that rain contained vitamin B12 and was wondering if it was true. Could someone help? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.81.58.226 (talk) 19:31, 8 March 2008 (UTC)

how high?[edit]

What altitude does rain fall from? —Preceding unsigned comment added by QHand (talkcontribs) 20:47, 9 April 2008 (UTC)

Formation section[edit]

The formation section needs help. It says nothing about atmospheric conditions or humidity levels. It says nothing about cold and warm air masses. It says nothing about mountain ranges. The text that is in the Formation section does an extremely poor job of explaining anything related to rain formation. With that said, could someone with some knowledge and access to reference materials expand this section? Some pictures or graphics would be nice too. Thanks. ABlake (talk) 19:53, 15 August 2008 (UTC)

North America?[edit]

The north america section mentions only locations in the u.s. With not a word of Canada, Mexico, or any of the smaller north american nations.

The section should be changed to u.s. and make a new north america section. or include more information in that section so that the title fits. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.82.121.3 (talk) 20:26, 3 September 2008 (UTC)

composition of rain[edit]

What is known about the composition of rain? Of course it's mostly water, but I would expect that it is loaded to saturation with CO2, and that the dissolved O2 content is high. I would also expect a temperature dependence, but would not care to guess whether is the temperature at formation, or the temperature near the (say, ocean) surface that is more important in controlling concentrations of gaseous components. blackcloak (talk) 07:51, 21 November 2008 (UTC)

Pattern of raindrops[edit]

The pattern in which raindrops fall seems anything but random. What is known about it? (This relates to the "walls" of torrential raindrops mentioned by a previous poster, but I'm asking more about the localized pattern in "steady" rainfall) Wnt (talk) 06:19, 5 December 2008 (UTC)

Rain versus Rainfall[edit]

I think it is important to mention the diffrence between the two concepts and their use. I saw Rainfall is being redirected to rain which, I believe, is totally wrong. There is a fine line between those two "understandings", one does not mean the other and are not interchangeable, although they do imply one another and often they both are included in a meteorological reports. Aleksandr Grigoryev (talk) 17:01, 15 May 2009 (UTC)

Different oxygen isotopes which fall during MCS/tropical cyclones[edit]

This definitely needs to be treated within this article, as paleotempestologists use this to time past hurricane events. It could probably be covered in the MCS article as well, now that I think more about it. Thegreatdr (talk) 11:18, 1 August 2009 (UTC)

Not really accurate ?[edit]

Again, there is claim laid to Mobile, AL for the rainiest city in the 48 contiguous states with five feet of annual rain.

Is this based on the MSNBC article two years past?

Forks, WA records an average of ten (10) feet a year. The totals for the last few years, in inches:

2003 130.28 2004 100.40 2005 110.99 2006 125.05 2007 131.66 2008 118.29

That is low of 8.37 feet and high of 10.97 feet.


Mobile, AL my foot :)

75.121.229.89 (talk) 00:36, 17 August 2009 (UTC) Skipper 17:36 PST 8.16.2009

There are several ways you can measure "rainiest city". First you have to define "rainiest", and then you have to define "city". "Rainiest" can be measured by the amount, or by the number of days when it rains. "City" can be defined by official incorporation title, size, population, etc. You would need to know how they defined "rainiest city" to dispute the claim. Famartin (talk) 21:06, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Artificial Rain[edit]

The article does not mention anything with regards to artificial or human induced rain. I believe it would be worth adding materials in there on the subject. I do not know anything on that otherwise I would have added myself. Qadirma (talk) 09:43, 5 October 2009 (UTC)

Portland rainfall inacurate[edit]

Portland's rainfall is 35 inches per year, not 45 as the editor suggests —Preceding unsigned comment added by Jamesj2 (talkcontribs) 19:57, 22 October 2009 (UTC)


Major expansion[edit]

This article was missing a lot of information, and some information is still needed. Much has been added and reorganized. After several more references are added, the info in the lead is reconciled with the article below, and the rainfall climatology information by continent is fairly complete we can think about GANing it. Let me know if anything else significant is missing from this article. Thegreatdr (talk) 21:12, 2 January 2010 (UTC)

Down to 4 paragraphs needing references. Think all the necessary content is already here. Thegreatdr (talk) 16:13, 15 January 2010 (UTC)

I have shuffled the sections a bit, but I did not remove or alter any information. I think that the article has a better flow this way. Nergaal (talk) 10:57, 3 February 2010 (UTC)

Global precipitation trend - up or flat?[edit]

The following statements in the "Human Influence" section seem to be contradictory: "Increasing temperatures tend to increase evaporation which leads to more precipitation. As average global temperatures have risen, average global precipitation has also increased." "Globally there has been no statistically significant overall trend in precipitation over the past century..."

I plead utter ignorance as to which is correct. Both statements come from reference [56], viz. EPA citing IPCC FAR WG1. But that doesn't (in my mind, at least) mitigate the apparent contradiction.

Anyone more knowledgeable who knows of a reliable source to back up one or the other statement? Or reconcile the two?

Thanks. LijeBailey (talk) 21:12, 27 February 2010 (UTC)

There's a surprise. A consensus document has contradictions. In this case, that is a real problem. I made an effort to resolve the situation. Thegreatdr (talk) 04:38, 28 February 2010 (UTC)

Inches?[edit]

How is it determined how many inches of rain is going to fall/has fallen? Inches over what measurement of land? If someone knows the answer to this maybe it should be on the main page? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.160.179.228 (talk) 04:12, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

I've changed the article (a bit late, I know) to hopefully clear this up some... see the measurement section. -RunningOnBrains(talk) 09:40, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

Deserts inaccuracy/vandalism[edit]

In the section under Deserts, someone has listed the Willamette Valley of Oregon as one of four drier regions of the United States. It fact it is one of the wettest; the rainfall map linking from their reference will attest to that. Or ask anyone who lives here; June has already given us 2.81" in 18 days so far. {{editsemiprotected}}

159.121.4.169 (talk) 20:53, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

Done Favonian (talk) 19:15, 18 June 2010 (UTC)

Causes[edit]

All (or very nearly all) of the "causes" section here is identical to that in Precipitation (meteorology) and that I think is bad. Since the causes stuff here isn't rain-specifc (same applies to snow) I think it is better in ppn. so the stuff here should be removed; and we should just link across William M. Connolley (talk) 20:58, 26 September 2010 (UTC)

Wettest places[edit]

"Cherrapunji situated on the southern slopes of the Eastern Himalaya in Shillong, India is one of the wettest places on Earth, with an average annual rainfall of 11,430 mm (450 in). "

I don't know what those mountains are called where Cherrapunji is, but it is NOT the Eastern Himalaya.Eregli bob (talk) 15:12, 8 February 2011 (UTC)

I think the section could do with bullet points for each of the places, rather than lumping them together in one paragraph (I don't know how to do them myself though).

¬¬¬¬ — Preceding unsigned comment added by Meltingpot (talkcontribs) 17:40, 19 February 2013 (UTC)

Paragraph form is usually preferred to inline lists. In any event, the table seems to accomplish much the same thing that a bullet list would, doesn't it? Rivertorch (talk) 19:33, 19 February 2013 (UTC)

The wettest places is not very good. As long as we are talking about estimates (cause people dont live in the most extreme places to run a weather station). Ålfotbreen in Norway has around 5,600 mm a year. Source http://www.ub.uib.no/elpub/2005/h/406004/Hovedoppgave.pdf. This is probably a wetter place than the one in Montenegro. Lolper11 (talk) 12:29, 4 March 2013 (UTC)

The wettest places section of this article should be an independent entry. There is a wealth of information regarding wettest places on each continent, causes of extreme rainfall, dispute between wettest locations, and potential undiscovered wettest locations. More than enough to create a standalone article.

Requesting permission to create an independent article of Earth's wettest places -Ivvavik — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ivvavik (talkcontribs) 02:27, 29 August 2018 (UTC)

Typo?[edit]

I think this is merely a typo, but I have no idea how it should read.

There is a statement in the article:

"Over the contiguous United States, total annual precipitation increased at an average rate of 6.1 percent per century since 1900"

There has only been one century since 1900.

-john

Science News resource "Rain tips balance between forest and savanna: Amount of tree cover can shift suddenly and abruptly"[edit]

Also see Tipping point. 97.87.29.188 (talk) 22:52, 9 November 2011 (UTC)

See Trees. 99.19.43.8 (talk) 00:02, 12 November 2011 (UTC)

Poor Description of Why Rain Falls[edit]

This article gives the appearance of being "scientific" and well-written, but it actually does not describe clearly why rain falls. (P.S. - No, it does *not.* Re-read the article *carefully* and you'll see what I mean.) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.196.248.241 (talk) 07:33, 11 April 2012 (UTC)

Okay, I'll bite. The article says:

Coalescence occurs when water droplets fuse to create larger water droplets, or when water droplets freeze onto an ice crystal, which is known as the Bergeron process. Air resistance typically causes the water droplets in a cloud to remain stationary. When air turbulence occurs, water droplets collide, producing larger droplets. As these larger water droplets descend, coalescence continues, so that drops become heavy enough to overcome air resistance and fall as rain.

The only thing missing there, as far as I can see, is a mention of gravity, which hardly seems needed. Rivertorch (talk) 00:51, 12 April 2012 (UTC)

Coalescence is a fusing of material - for example, water drops. Therefore the first statement says "Coalescence occurs when coalescence occurs." And it's not an explanation of why that happens, it just uses a "big word" to sound more fancy. I'll give you the second one, about the "Bergeron process." It then states that air droplets "descend" as if stating that fact is an explanation. *Why* do they descend? Thermal air currents? Gravity? (etc.) Obviously a threshold is reached where gravity is overcome - but *why* is that threshold reached? What factors are necessary to overcome it? Does it always happen at the same altitude and temperature? Trust me, if you read this article *very* very carefully, you will see that there is hardly any explanation given for rain falling at *all.* It just *appears* to. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.196.248.241 (talk) 10:59, 23 April 2012 (UTC)

If I'm reading you correctly, you're looking for a much greater level of detail about the formation of raindrops and the factors that determine the threshold of their precipitation. I'm not sure whether you have a specific idea for achieving that in the article or are just curious. If the latter, tell you what—since this topic is well outside my field of expertise and no one else has responded, why don't you post something at the Reference Desk? (Btw, you can indent your replies by various degrees by adding one or more colons at the beginning of each paragraph. See Help:Talk#Indentation.) Rivertorch (talk) 17:53, 23 April 2012 (UTC)
If that is what is asked for, the user could create a new article called raindrop to provide the additional level of detail. We have good, detailed articles like that for snowflake and hail. It could be a subarticle to both drop and rain. Thegreatdr (talk) 18:23, 23 April 2012 (UTC)
Yes, I was just curious. I'll try to contact the reference desk to ask about it tomorrow. I don't really have the expertise or the time to write about it myself. Thanks for taking the time to respond. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.196.248.241 (talk) 04:56, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

I like the idea of a rain and raindrop article. The problem with wanting to know how "rain" forms is apparent from reading the article; there are dozens of separate phenomena which can work alone or in concert to form rain. If we have a raindrop article, we can have all the "why" here, and the "what" there. I may start it tomorrow. -RunningOnBrains(talk) 09:08, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

CULTURE[edit]

Good now I have your attention. now I am wondering if there are any cultural aspects of rain, I am pretty sure there are; its just that I don't know how to cite sources.--Commander v99 (talk) 21:51, 11 April 2012 (UTC)

See Wikipedia:Citing sources for information about how to cite sources. You don't have to SHOUT to get your fellow Wikipedians' attention, btw. Rivertorch (talk) 00:24, 12 April 2012 (UTC)

Commonly used categories?[edit]

E.g., the widely-used "www.weather.com" refers to "Light Rain," then "Showers." What do these mean? Which is heavier, longer, etc.? Is there a common taxonomy that can be listed in a table, or some discussion of the various phrases used? Thanks! Benefac (talk) 10:03, 17 July 2013 (UTC)

Really depends from country to country and even between organisations (eg. Bureau of Meteorology's Glossary and Weather Words). Bidgee (talk) 12:19, 17 July 2013 (UTC)

"Phantom Rain"? Wikipedia has an article about VIRGA and for consistencies sake I suggest at least mentioning here that "Phantom Rain" is called VIRGA. GodsGoodCountry (talk) 20:43, 27 July 2014 (UTC)

Rate?[edit]

In the sentence "total annual precipitation increased at an average rate of 6.1 percent since 1900", should this perhaps read instead "total annual precipitation has increased by 6.1 percent since 1900"? I can't think of a meaning for this sentence where either "average" or "rate" makes sense. Vaughan Pratt (talk) 16:06, 10 September 2014 (UTC)

Hyetograph[edit]

Can a link be added to Hyetograph — Preceding unsigned comment added by 141.244.172.122 (talk) 09:20, 29 January 2015 (UTC)

"euphemisms" -->"slang expressions"[edit]

several informal synonyms for violent rain are listed. These are denoted "euphemisms" I think a more accurate characterization would be "slang expressions" The expressions quoted don't fit the definition of a euphemism.Imlikewhoa (talk) 16:46, 12 September 2015 (UTC)

include volume fraction in "intensity" section[edit]

In the "intensity" section after the listing of light, moderate, heavy, violent categories, I suggest to add

In violent (50mm/hour) rain with large (5mm) raindrops, about 3 parts per million of the air volume (or 3 parts per thousand of its mass) is liquid water.


justification:

the volume fraction is the ratio of the rain intensity (50mm/(24*60 sec) or 34 x 10^-6 meters/sec) to the raindrop velocity. elsewhere in the article 5 mm raindrops are said to fall at about 10 meters/sec. The volume fraction is thus (34/10) x 10^-6 . Imlikewhoa (talk) 17:17, 12 September 2015 (UTC)

I am linking in from a different perspective, Rain gutter. Rainfall intensity is measures in l/s/m² in SI units? I am particularly interested in 0.0208 l/s/m² used as a rule of thumb in the building industry. This section doesn't provide an easy link. Any thoughts, please ping me. --ClemRutter (talk) 10:10, 6 January 2017 (UTC)
The SI unit for l/s/m² is 0.01m3/s. However 1l/s/m² is usually expressed as a rainfall of 1mm in 1second; a very heavy rainfall event! Thus 0.0208 l/s/m² = 0.0208mm of rainfall per second which equates to about 54mm of rain per hour- a very heavy rainfall event. Hope my maths is correct !  Velella  Velella Talk   10:15, 7 January 2017 (UTC)

November 25, 2015[edit]

It's raining outside the weather of November 25, 2015. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.46.167.143 (talk) 13:21, 13 September 2015 (UTC)

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snow[edit]

snow is happens when the temperature is under 32. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.108.81.181 (talk) 13:13, 22 September 2016 (UTC)

No. Snow may occur when the tempertaure drops below 1 degree C (Centrigrade is used by all meterologists, even in the US) but equally super-cooled water may fall as rain at this temperature as may hail. However, much of the time when the temperatuer is below freezing, there are clear skies and no preciptation occurs at all.  Velella  Velella Talk   01:35, 26 January 2017 (UTC)

Math error in intensity section[edit]

Hello,

I am mostly a reader and am not a confirmed user, but I noticed a fairly egregious mathematical misconception in the category "measurement" --> "intensity". A storm (or any event) that has a one percent chance of occurring in a year does not have a fifty percent chance of occurring in 100 years. If it did, it would also follow that the storm had a 100% probability of occurring in 100 years (which probability should not guarantee) and a 150% chance of occurring in 150 years (which doesn't make sense).

This issue is addressed in the probability section of the 100 year flood page, which is linked to at the top of the aforementioned subsection. That page cites this link for support "http://www.floods.org/ace-files/documentlibrary/Publications/asfpmpubs-techrep7_2015.pdf"

It should be edited to say that this is a common misconception and that a 1 in 100 year storm has about a one percent chance of occurring each year, but by independence of probability, one or more such storms actually have about a 63% chance of occurring in 100 years.

Brohring (talk) 20:42, 25 January 2017 (UTC)

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External links modified[edit]

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