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United Kingdom Election Results

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United Kingdom Election Results
United Kingdom Election Results.jpg
Screenshot of first page
Author David Boothroyd
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Subject Elections in the United Kingdom
Genre Non-fiction
Publisher D. Boothroyd
Publication date
1994
OCLC 51544846
Followed by The History of British Political Parties (2001)

United Kingdom Election Results is a website and e-book written by David Boothroyd, published in 1994.[1] Boothroyd also wrote The History of British Political Parties, published in 2001.[2] The website includes material about elections in the United Kingdom, including election results, resources for further information and links to relevant websites.[1] Boothroyd used a minimalist approach for the site's design, avoiding "flashy graphics" and placing an emphasis on "authoritative unbiased information".[3]

Boothroyd's website has been cited by several organisations and authors, including the United Nations Development Programme and the Parliament of Australia.[4] Boothroyd's site is listed as a resource by the website of the Parliamentary Library of the Parliament of Australia,[5] and the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law at The University of New South Wales.[6] The Data & Information Services Center of the University of Wisconsin said that Boothroyd maintains "an emphasis on including the entire range of parties",[7] and The University of York library said that the "site maintained by David Boothroyd provides detailed results data for all UK Parliamentary Elections since 1983".[8]

Contents[edit]

The site contains information and resources related to UK elections, including election results, lists of candidates and maps of election districts.[1] It also contains resources such as links to relevant websites covering politics and those of political parties.[1] In an introduction to the website, Boothroyd writes: "Unlike some other political sites, this site doesn’t go in for minimising the information to ‘major parties’ only, using flashy graphics that distract from the content, compromising its impartiality by accepting sponsorship, or including irrelevant party propaganda. On these pages you will find authoritative unbiased information and nothing else."[3]

Data on parliamentary elections in the UK since 1983 are on the website.[7][8][9] It also includes results of the Labour Party National Executive Committee elections, European Parliamentary elections from 1994 onwards, a list of members expelled since the 1660 Restoration, and recent regional elections for the National Assembly for Wales, the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the Greater London Authority.[8][9] The earliest snapshot of the website in the archival database Internet Archive is from 1996.[10] The website is located at www.election.demon.co.uk.[6][11]

Reception[edit]

"David Boothroyd maintains this site of British Parliamentary Election results, going back in some cases as far as 1983, with an emphasis on including the entire range of parties."
 —University of Wisconsin[7]

Several authors and organisations—including United Nations Development Programme (2004),[12] the Politics and Public Administration Group of the Parliament of Australia (2002),[4] and Scott L. Greer (2005)[13]—have cited Boothroyd's website in their works. Oonag Gay and Patricia Leopold used information about parliamentary expulsion from the site in their book Conduct Unbecoming:The Regulation of Parliamentary Behaviour (2004); they wrote, "As the author, David Boothroyd, makes clear, expulsion was no bar to further parliamentary career in the eighteenth century."[14] The Guardian referenced the site in a 2007 article about politics of education in the UK.[11]

In their 2008 book The Politics of Electoral Systems, Michael Gallagher and Paul Mitchell wrote that Boothroyd's site "Has detailed results of elections at all levels of government."[15] The website of the Parliamentary Library of the Parliament of Australia lists Boothroyd's site as a resource,[5] as does the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law at The University of New South Wales.[6] The Data & Information Services Center of the University of Wisconsin said that Boothroyd maintains "an emphasis on including the entire range of parties".[7] RBA (Rhodes-Blakeman Associates) website maintained by Karen Blakeman describes Boothroyd's resource as a "fast-loading, no-nonsense site".[9] The University of York library said that the "site maintained by David Boothroyd provides detailed results data for all UK Parliamentary Elections since 1983".[8] "Scottish Politics", the website of the Scottish Politics Research Institute, Alba Publishing said, "Those interested in election results and analysis from England & Wales are encouraged to consult David Boothroyd's inspirational United Kingdom Election Results site."[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d OCLC 51544846
  2. ^ Caless, Valerie (Winter 2001). "The History of British Political Parties". The School Librarian. School Library Association. 49: 219–220. 
  3. ^ a b Boothroyd, David (9 February 2008). "United Kingdom Election Results". www.election.demon.co.uk. Internet Archive. Archived from the original on 9 February 2008. Retrieved 1 June 2009. 
  4. ^ a b Holland, Ian; Sarah Miskin, Politics and Public Administration Group (27 August 2002). "Interpreting Election Results in Western Democracies". Current Issues Brief. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 
  5. ^ a b Parliament of Australia (15 October 2008). "Elections – Key Internet Links". Parliamentary Library. Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 
  6. ^ a b c Mercurio, Bryan (24 September 2007). "Resource Pages: Electoral Law". Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law. The University of New South Wales. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 
  7. ^ a b c d Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System (2009). "Elections". DISC: Internet Crossroads. www.disc.wisc.edu. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 
  8. ^ a b c d The University of York (23 February 2009). "Politics – Library, The University of York". University Library & Archives. www.york.ac.uk. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 
  9. ^ a b c Blakeman, Karen (9 November 2008). "Government and Politics". RBA (Rhodes-Blakeman Associates). www.rba.co.uk. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 
  10. ^ "Searched for www.election.demon.co.uk". Internet Archive Wayback Machine. Internet Archive. 2009. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Turner, Lyndsey (8 May 2007). "Education: Learn: After Blair: Most pupils can remember only one prime minister. Lyndsey Turner looks at what happens when he resigns". The Guardian. Guardian Newspapers Ltd. 
  12. ^ United Nations Development Programme (15 July 2004). Human Development Report 2004: Cultural Liberty in Today's Diverse World. Oxford University Press. pp. 55, 110, 113. ISBN 978-0-19-522146-6. 
  13. ^ Greer, Scott L. (10 February 2005). Territorial Politics and Health Policy: UK Health Policy in Comparative Perspective. Manchester University Press. p. 108. ISBN 0-7190-6950-5. 
  14. ^ Gay, Oonag, ed. (2004). Conduct Unbecoming:The Regulation of Parliamentary Behavior. Leoplod, Patricia. London: Politico's Publishing (Methuen Publishing Limited). p. 1. 
  15. ^ Gallagher, Michael; Paul Mitchell (23 March 2008). The Politics of Electoral Systems. Oxford University Press. p. 630. ISBN 0-19-923867-7. 
  16. ^ Scottish Politics Research Unit (2009). "Scottish Politics: The almanac of Scottish elections and politics". Scottish Politics Research Unit, Alba Publishing, Scotland. www.alba.org.uk. Archived from the original on 28 January 2010. Retrieved 13 June 2009. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]