Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park

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Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Trail
Stone-Bridge-Clarkes-Gap.jpg
Stone arch at Clarks Gap, August 2008
Length44.7 mi (71.9 km)
LocationVirginia, United States
TrailheadsEast: Shirlington in Arlington County
West: Purcellville in Loudoun County
UseBiking
Horseback riding
Running
Hiking
Elevation
Elevation change469 ft (143 m)
Highest pointClarks Gap, 610 ft (190 m)
Lowest pointShirlington, 141 ft (43 m)
Hiking details
SeasonAll

The Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park is a linear regional park in Northern Virginia. The park's primary feature is the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Trail (abbreviated as W&OD Trail), an asphalt-surfaced paved rail trail that runs through densely populated urban and suburban communities as well as through rural areas.[1] Most of the trail travels on top of the rail bed of the former Washington and Old Dominion Railroad, which closed in 1968.[2]

Although the park is 44.8 miles (72.1 km) long, it is only about 100 feet (30 m) wide. The rail trail is approximately 10 feet (3.0 m) wide through much of its length and is suitable for walking, running, cycling, and roller skating. A crushed bluestone surfaced bridle path travels near the paved trail in the park's most westerly 32 miles (51 km).[3]

NOVA Parks (formerly named the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NVRPA)) administers and maintains the park and its trails. NOVA Parks keeps most of the parkland surrounding the trails in a natural state. The park authority has placed alongside the paved trail a series of mile markers and a number of interpretative exhibits that describe the historic and natural features of the park (see Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Stations for locations of historical markers near the W&OD Trail).[4][5]

The headquarters office of the park is near the east side of the trail at Smith's Switch Road in Ashburn.[6] A park rest stop is adjacent to the trail near the park's headquarters.

Trail route[edit]

W&OD Trail Elevation Map
Marker at end of the W&OD Trail in Purcellville showing the trail's route (August 2018)

The W&OD Trail begins in the Nauck neighborhood near the Shirlington section of Arlington County, close to the boundary between the County and the City of Alexandria.[7] The trail ends in Purcellville in western Loudoun County. Its route largely parallels the routes of the Potomac River and Virginia State Route 7 (VA Route 7).

The trail connects at its origin to the paved Four Mile Run Trail, which travels eastward through Arlington along a stream embankment to meet the Mount Vernon Trail at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, near the Potomac River.[8][9] The start of the trail is also accessible from the Shirlington exit (Exit 6) of Interstate 395 (I-395) (the Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway).

Looking east towards the start of the W&OD Trail in Arlington County (May 2014)

The trail parallels the more curving and hilly Four Mile Run Trail throughout its route in Arlington.[8] Although they coincide in several locations, the two trails generally travel on opposite sides of the Run. There are no restrooms and few water fountains alongside the W&OD Trail in the County. Restrooms and additional water fountains are available near ball fields and picnic areas along the Four Mile Run Trail.

The W&OD trailhead (Mile 0) is at the intersection of South Shirlington Road and South Four Mile Run Drive.[7] The trail starts in the Atlantic Coastal Plain at the trail's lowest elevation: 141 feet (43 m) above sea level.

The trail climbs 195 feet (59 m) in 5.9 miles (9.5 km) while traveling northwest through Arlington County. While in Arlington, the trail ascends through the Atlantic Seaboard fall line while climbing upstream in the valley of Four Mile Run. The trail crosses the Run seven times in the valley on bridges whose abutments were constructed before the Civil War by the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad, a predecessor of the W&OD Railroad.

W&OD Railroad Regional Park sign in Falls Church (September 2012)

After crossing Columbia Pike (VA Route 244), the trail enters a steeply-sloped woodland that covers both sides of the valley. Near the end of the woodland, the trail intersects the Bluemont Junction Trail, a paved rail trail that travels to Ballston on the bed of a former W&OD Railroad branch that once ran to Rosslyn and Georgetown.[10] 0.6 miles (1.0 km) past that intersection, the W&OD Trail meets the Custis Trail, which travels along Interstate 66 (I-66) (the Custis Memorial Parkway) between East Falls Church and Rosslyn and which provides access to Washington, D.C.[11]

After joining at their intersection, the W&OD and Custis Trails share the same path as they travel northwest near an I-66 soundwall for most of their remaining courses in Arlington. After crossing North Sycamore Street, the W&OD Trail passes the East Falls Church station on Washington Metro's Orange and Silver Lines.[12]

After leaving the fall line, the W&OD Trail enters the Piedmont plateau region near the west corner of the County. The trail continues to climb in the Piedmont while traveling northwest through the City of Falls Church and Fairfax County. The trail reaches an elevation of 450 feet (140 m) at its crossing of I-66 in Fairfax County. When it reaches this point, the trail has risen 309 feet (94 m) while traveling 8.4 miles (13.5 km).

After crossing over I-495 (the Capital Beltway) on a trail bridge and passing Dunn Loring, the trail begins a long descent as it travels through Vienna. After leaving Vienna, the trail continues to descend until it reaches Difficult Run (Mile 14.3), where its elevation of 240 feet (73 m) is only about 100 feet (30 m) higher than is the elevation at the trail's origin.

View of Goose Creek from the W&OD Trail in March 2012

After the trail crosses Difficult Run, it ascends and descends between additional streams (including Sugarland Run, Broad Run, Beaverdam Run, Goose Creek, Sycolin Creek and Tuscarora Creek) as it travels further northwest in the Piedmont through or near Reston, Herndon, Sterling, Ashburn, and Leesburg. While traveling through Reston, the trail crosses Wiehle Avenue 0.3 miles (0.5 km) northeast of the Wiehle–Reston East station on Washington Metro's Silver Line.[13]

When crossing Tuscarora Creek in Leesburg, the trail's elevation of 273 feet (83 m) is 63 feet (19 m) lower than the highest elevation that it reached in Arlington. After crossing that stream, the trail climbs 337 feet (103 m) northwest in 6.3 miles (10.1 km) to reach its highest elevation (610 feet (190 m)) while traveling on a bridge carrying VA Route 9 (Charles Town Pike) over VA Route 7 near the saddle point of Clarks Gap in Catoctin Mountain.[14] 0.3 miles (0.48 km) before this crossing, the trail travels under an old stone arch that formerly carried VA Route 7 over the W&OD Railroad.

The trail then turns west, descends through Paeonian Springs to Hamilton Station and climbs to reach Purcellville. When the trail terminates in Purcellville, its elevation is 564 feet (172 m) above sea level.

W&OD Trail features[edit]

Feature Jurisdiction[15] Distance from
Trailhead[16]
Trail Elevation[17] Coordinates[18]
Four Mile Run Trail-W&OD Trail Connector City of Alexandria

Arlington County

---- ---- 38°50′35″N 77°04′52″W / 38.8431797°N 77.0811698°W / 38.8431797; -77.0811698 (Four Mile Run Trail/W&OD Trail Connector)
Trailhead Arlington County 0 141 feet (43 m) 38°50′39″N 77°05′09″W / 38.844269°N 77.085878°W / 38.844269; -77.085878 (W&OD Trail trailhead)
Crossing of Columbia Pike (VA Route 244) Arlington County 1.6 miles (2.6 km) 209 feet (64 m) 38°51′23″N 77°06′35″W / 38.856398°N 77.109649°W / 38.856398; -77.109649 (W&OD Trail crossing of Columbia Pike)
Overlook of Sparrow Pond wetland Arlington County 2.1 miles (3.4 km) 237 feet (72 m) 38°51′43″N 77°06′56″W / 38.862077°N 77.115532°W / 38.862077; -77.115532 (Sparrow Pond)
Arlington Boulevard (U.S. Route 50) bridge over trail and Four Mile Run Arlington County 2.6 miles (4.2 km) 249 feet (76 m) 38°51′59″N 77°07′26″W / 38.866501°N 77.123769°W / 38.866501; -77.123769 (U.S. Route 50 bridge over W&OD Trail)
Carlin Springs Road bridge over trail and Four Mile Run Arlington County 3.0 miles (4.8 km) 232 feet (71 m) 38°52′04″N 77°07′40″W / 38.867893°N 77.127749°W / 38.867893; -77.127749 (Carlin Springs Road bridge over W&OD Trail)
Intersection with Bluemont Junction Trail Arlington County 3.3 miles (5.3 km) 243 feet (74 m) 38°52′19″N 77°07′56″W / 38.871832°N 77.132108°W / 38.871832; -77.132108 (Intersection of W&OD Trail and Bluemont Junction Trail)
Bluemont Junction Railroad Display and Caboose Arlington County 3.4 miles (5.5 km) 243 feet (74 m) 38°52′23″N 77°07′57″W / 38.87306°N 77.132564°W / 38.87306; -77.132564 (Bluemont Junction caboose)
Wilson Boulevard bridge over trail and Four Mile Run Arlington County 3.5 miles (5.6 km) 243 feet (74 m) 38°52′30″N 77°08′01″W / 38.875012°N 77.133618°W / 38.875012; -77.133618 (Wilson Boulevard bridge over W&OD Trailand Four Mile Run)
Intersection with Custis Trail Arlington County 3.9 miles (6.3 km) 272 feet (83 m) 38°52′45″N 77°08′20″W / 38.879128°N 77.13877°W / 38.879128; -77.13877 (Intersection of W&OD Trail and Custis Trail)
Brandymore Castle (rock outcrop) Arlington County 4.8 miles (7.7 km) 299 feet (91 m) 38°53′02″N 77°09′12″W / 38.883792°N 77.153437°W / 38.883792; -77.153437 (Brandymore Castle)
East Falls Church Metro Station Arlington County 5.3 miles (8.5 km) 336 feet (102 m) 38°53′10″N 77°09′25″W / 38.886072°N 77.157047°W / 38.886072; -77.157047 (East Falls Church Metro Station)
Crossing of Lee Highway (U.S. Route 29) Arlington County 5.5 miles (8.9 km) 336 feet (102 m) 38°53′15″N 77°09′44″W / 38.8874°N 77.16217°W / 38.8874; -77.16217 (Crossing of W&OD Trail and Lee Highway (U.S. Route 29))
Former site of Falls Church W&OD Railroad station Arlington County 5.6 miles (9.0 km) 336 feet (102 m) 38°53′14″N 77°09′45″W / 38.887358°N 77.162631°W / 38.887358; -77.162631 (Site of Falls Church station of W&OD Railroad)
Coal trestle remnant Arlington County 5.6 miles (9.0 km) 336 feet (102 m) 38°53′15″N 77°09′48″W / 38.8875844°N 77.1634462°W / 38.8875844; -77.1634462 (Coal trestle (Washington & Old Dominion Railroad))
Crossing of Little Falls Road Arlington County 5.9 miles (9.5 km) 325 feet (99 m) 38°53′18″N 77°09′57″W / 38.888313°N 77.165928°W / 38.888313; -77.165928 (Crossing of W&OD Trail and Little Falls Road)
W&OD Railroad station mile marker post City of Falls Church 5.9 miles (9.5 km) 325 feet (99 m) 38°53′18″N 77°09′59″W / 38.888471°N 77.166426°W / 38.888471; -77.166426 (W&OD Railroad station mile marker post)
Former site of West Falls Church W&OD Railroad station City of Falls Church 6.9 miles (11.1 km) 388 feet (118 m) 38°53′30″N 77°11′07″W / 38.891649°N 77.185226°W / 38.891649; -77.185226 (Site of West Falls Church station of W&OD Railroad)
Trail bridge over West Broad Street (VA Route 7) City of Falls Church 7.0 miles (11.3 km) 388 feet (118 m) 38°53′30″N 77°11′09″W / 38.891768°N 77.185972°W / 38.891768; -77.185972 (W&OD Trail bridge over West Broad Street (VA Route 7))
Trail and Virginia Lane bridge over I-66 and Washington Metro Fairfax County 8.4 miles (13.5 km) 453 feet (138 m) 38°53′28″N 77°12′38″W / 38.890995°N 77.2106°W / 38.890995; -77.2106 (Virginia Lane bridge over I-66 and Metrorail)
Trail bridge over I-495 (Capital Beltway) Fairfax County 8.9 miles (14.3 km) 417 feet (127 m) 38°53′26″N 77°13′04″W / 38.890478°N 77.217863°W / 38.890478; -77.217863 (W&OD Trail bridge over I-495 (Capital Beltway))
Sandburg Street, Dunn Loring Fairfax County 9.1 miles (14.6 km) 417 feet (127 m) 38°53′30″N 77°13′20″W / 38.8916257°N 77.2223264°W / 38.8916257; -77.2223264 (Sandburg Street (Dunn Loring))
Washington-Virginia Railway bridge abutments Town of Vienna 10.4 miles (16.7 km) 447 feet (136 m) 38°54′00″N 77°14′45″W / 38.89988°N 77.245718°W / 38.89988; -77.245718 (Washington-Virginia Railway bridge abutments)
Freeman Store and Museum Town of Vienna 11.6 miles (18.7 km) 376 feet (115 m) 38°54′12″N 77°15′54″W / 38.903357°N 77.265113°W / 38.903357; -77.265113 (Freeman Store and Museum)
Railroad whistle post in Vienna Centennial Park Town of Vienna 11.7 miles (18.8 km) 376 feet (115 m) 38°54′12″N 77°15′56″W / 38.9033584°N 77.2655408°W / 38.9033584; -77.2655408 (Whistle post in Vienna Centennial Park)
Vienna Caboose and Museum in Vienna Centennial Park Town of Vienna 11.7 miles (18.8 km) 376 feet (115 m) 38°54′13″N 77°15′57″W / 38.903608°N 77.265708°W / 38.903608; -77.265708 (Vienna Caboose and Museum)
Vienna W&OD Railroad Station and model railroad Town of Vienna 11.8 miles (19.0 km) 349 feet (106 m) 38°54′15″N 77°16′01″W / 38.904142°N 77.266974°W / 38.904142; -77.266974 (Vienna W&OD Railroad Station and model railroad)
Trail bridge over Piney Branch Fairfax County 13.6 miles (21.9 km) 260 feet (79 m) 38°55′32″N 77°17′18″W / 38.925642°N 77.288381°W / 38.925642; -77.288381 (W&OD Trail bridge over Piney Branch)
Trail bridge over Difficult Run Fairfax County 14.3 miles (23.0 km) 240 feet (73 m) 38°55′51″N 77°17′54″W / 38.930942°N 77.29834°W / 38.930942; -77.29834 (W&OD Trail Bridge over Difficult Run)
Dulles Access Road and Dulles Toll Road (VA Route 267) bridges over trail Fairfax County 16.1 miles (25.9 km) 354 feet (108 m) 38°56′41″N 77°19′32″W / 38.944607°N 77.325618°W / 38.944607; -77.325618 (Dulles Access Road and Dulles Toll Road bridges over W&OD Trail)
Crossing of Wiehle Avenue near Wiehle-Reston East Metro Station Fairfax County 16.8 miles (27.0 km) 378 feet (115 m) 38°57′02″N 77°20′09″W / 38.950455°N 77.335805°W / 38.950455; -77.335805 (W&OD Trail crossing of Wiehle Avenue)
Sunset Hills W&OD Railroad Station, Reston Fairfax County 17.7 miles (28.5 km) 379 feet (116 m) 38°57′21″N 77°21′06″W / 38.955869°N 77.351789°W / 38.955869; -77.351789 (Sunset Hills W&OD Railroad Station)
Intersection with trail to Reston Town Center Fairfax County 18.2 miles (29.3 km) 408 feet (124 m) 38°57′23″N 77°21′41″W / 38.956347°N 77.361318°W / 38.956347; -77.361318 (Intersection of W&OD Trail and trail to Reston Town Center)
Intersection with trail to Fairfax County Parkway Trail Fairfax County 18.6 miles (29.9 km) 386 feet (118 m) 38°57′28″N 77°22′06″W / 38.957696°N 77.368381°W / 38.957696; -77.368381 (Intersection of W&OD Trail and trail to Fairfax County Parkway Trail)
Sugarland Run culvert Town of Herndon 18.8 miles (30.3 km) 376 feet (115 m) 38°57′35″N 77°22′16″W / 38.9596028°N 77.3711514°W / 38.9596028; -77.3711514 (Sugarland Run culvert)
Intersection with Sugarland Run Valley Stream Trail Town of Herndon 18.9 miles (30.4 km) 376 feet (115 m) 38°57′37″N 77°22′18″W / 38.960155°N 77.371800°W / 38.960155; -77.371800 (Intersection with Sugarland Run Valley Stream Trail)
Herndon Depot Museum Town of Herndon 19.9 miles (32.0 km) 373 feet (114 m) 38°58′13″N 77°23′09″W / 38.970174°N 77.385716°W / 38.970174; -77.385716 (Herndon W&OD Railroad Station and Museum)
Herndon Caboose Town of Herndon 20.0 miles (32.2 km) 373 feet (114 m) 38°58′15″N 77°23′10″W / 38.970733°N 77.386073°W / 38.970733; -77.386073 (Herndon Caboose)
West Church Road bridge over trail, Sterling Loudoun County 23.3 miles (37.5 km) 317 feet (97 m) 39°00′19″N 77°25′40″W / 39.0053911°N 77.4278775°W / 39.0053911; -77.4278775 (W. Church Street Underpass (Sterling))
Trail bridge over Sully Road (VA Route 28) (viewpoint) Loudoun County 23.9 miles (38.5 km) 299 feet (91 m) 39°00′41″N 77°26′00″W / 39.011481°N 77.433336°W / 39.011481; -77.433336 (W&OD Trail bridge over Sulley Road (VA Route 28))
Trail bridge over Broad Run Loudoun County 24.6 miles (39.6 km) 269 feet (82 m) 39°01′06″N 77°26′42″W / 39.01845°N 77.444923°W / 39.01845; -77.444923 (W&OD Trail bridge over Broad Run)
Loudoun County Parkway Crossing Loudoun County 25.0 miles (40.2 km)
W&OD Regional Park Headquarters, Ashburn Loudoun County 25.8 miles (41.5 km) 261 feet (80 m) 39°01′38″N 77°27′39″W / 39.02736°N 77.46082°W / 39.02736; -77.46082 (W&OD Regional Park Headquarters, Ashburn)
Smiths Switch Station rest stop, Ashburn Loudoun County 25.8 miles (41.5 km) 261 feet (80 m) 39°01′39″N 77°27′37″W / 39.027615°N 77.460367°W / 39.027615; -77.460367 (Smiths Switch Station rest stop, Ashburn)
Trail bridge over Beaverdam Run Loudoun County 26.2 miles (42.2 km) 261 feet (80 m) 39°01′55″N 77°28′02″W / 39.031905°N 77.467293°W / 39.031905; -77.467293 (W&OD Trail bridge over Beaverdam Run)
Crossing of Ashburn Road (VA Route 641) Loudoun County 27.5 miles (44.3 km) 320 feet (98 m) 39°02′38″N 77°29′15″W / 39.0439736°N 77.487430°W / 39.0439736; -77.487430 (W&OD Intersection of W&OD Trail and Ashburn Road (VA Route 641))
Trail bridge over Claiborne Parkway (VA Route 901) Loudoun Parkway 28.5 miles (45.9 km) 310 feet (94 m) 39°03′11″N 77°30′10″W / 39.053159°N 77.502749°W / 39.053159; -77.502749 (W&OD Intersection of W&OD Trail and Claiborne Parkway (VA Route 901))
Crossing of Belmont Ridge Road (VA Route 659) Loudoun County 29.4 miles (47.3 km) 309 feet (94 m) 39°03′49″N 77°30′40″W / 39.063652°N 77.511090°W / 39.063652; -77.511090 (W&OD Intersection of W&OD Trail and Belmont Ridge Road (VA Route 659))
Overlook of Luck Stone Quarry Loudoun County 29.6 miles (47.6 km) 309 feet (94 m) 39°04′03″N 77°31′03″W / 39.0673679°N 77.5174338°W / 39.0673679; -77.5174338 (W&OD Trail overlook of Luck Stone Quarry)
Trail bridge over Goose Creek Loudoun County 30.1 miles (48.4 km) 286 feet (87 m) 39°04′10″N 77°31′10″W / 39.0695212°N 77.5195795°W / 39.0695212; -77.5195795 (W&OD Trail bridge over Goose Creek)
Entrance to Two Creeks Trail Area Loudoun County 30.2 miles (48.6 km) 286 feet (87 m) 39°04′14″N 77°31′14″W / 39.0705874°N 77.5206256°W / 39.0705874; -77.5206256 (Entrance to Two Creeks Trail Area)
Trail bridge over Sycolin Creek Loudoun County 30.4 miles (48.9 km) 271 feet (83 m) 39°04′20″N 77°31′29″W / 39.0723324°N 77.524707°W / 39.0723324; -77.524707 (W&OD Trail bridge over Sycolin Creek)
Crossing of Cochrane Mill Road (VA Route 653) Loudoun County 30.6 miles (49.2 km) 271 feet (83 m) 39°04′26″N 77°31′42″W / 39.073783°N 77.5281992°W / 39.073783; -77.5281992 (Intersection of W&OD Trail and Cochrane Mill Road (VA Route 653)
Pleasant View Substation of Dominion Virginia Power Loudoun County 30.8 miles (49.6 km) 306 feet (93 m) 39°04′38″N 77°31′46″W / 39.07718°N 77.529472°W / 39.07718; -77.529472 (Pleasant View substation of Dominion Virginia Power)
Trail bridge over Tuscarora Creek Town of Leesburg 32.2 miles (51.8 km) 273 feet (83 m) 39°05′44″N 77°32′32″W / 39.0955799°N 77.5422549°W / 39.0955799; -77.5422549 (W&OD Trail bridge over Tuscarora Creek)
VA Route 7/U.S. Route 15 bridges over trail Town of Leesburg 33.0 miles (53.1 km) 286 feet (87 m) 39°06′01″N 77°32′59″W / 39.100376°N 77.549829°W / 39.100376; -77.549829 (VA Route 7/U.S. Route 15 bridges over W&OD Trail)
19th century lime kiln Town of Leesburg 34.1 miles (54.9 km) 326 feet (99 m) 39°06′35″N 77°33′40″W / 39.109596°N 77.561014°W / 39.109596; -77.561014 (19th century lime kiln)
Crossing of Harrison Street SE Town of Leesburg 34.3 miles (55.2 km) 330 feet (100 m) 39°06′37″N 77°33′48″W / 39.1104°N 77.563198°W / 39.1104; -77.563198 (Crossing of W&OD Trail and Harrison Street SE)
Crossing of S. King Street (U.S. Route 15 (Business)) Town of Leesburg 34.4 miles (55.4 km) 330 feet (100 m) 39°06′43″N 77°33′58″W / 39.111986°N 77.566137°W / 39.111986; -77.566137 (Crossing of W&OD Trail and S. King Street (U.S. Route 15 (Business))
Trail bridge over VA Route 7 Town of Leesburg 35.5 miles (57.1 km) 405 feet (123 m) 39°06′37″N 77°35′16″W / 39.11035°N 77.587756°W / 39.11035; -77.587756 (W&OD Trail bridge over VA Route 7)
Stone arch over trail at Clarks Gap Loudoun County 38.2 miles (61.5 km) 574 feet (175 m) 39°08′22″N 77°36′39″W / 39.13957°N 77.610887°W / 39.13957; -77.610887 (Stone arch over W&OD Trail at Clarks Gap)
Trail and VA Route 9 (Charles Town Pike) bridge over VA Route 7 at Clarks Gap Loudoun County 38.5 miles (62.0 km) 610 feet (190 m)[19] 39°08′27″N 77°36′45″W / 39.140942°N 77.612526°W / 39.140942; -77.612526 (VA State Route 9 bridge over VA Route 7)
Clarks Gap passenger shelter (relocated), Paeonian Springs Loudoun County 39.2 miles (63.1 km) 562 feet (171 m) 39°08′52″N 77°37′10″W / 39.147864°N 77.619434°W / 39.147864; -77.619434 (Clarks Gap passenger shelter (relocated))
Hamilton W&OD Railroad Station Loudoun County 40.9 miles (65.8 km) 472 feet (144 m) 39°08′39″N 77°39′05″W / 39.144091°N 77.651303°W / 39.144091; -77.651303 (Hamilton W&OD Railroad Station)
VA Route 7 bridges over trail and Berlin Turnpike (VA Route 287) Loudoun County 43.2 miles (69.5 km) 554 feet (169 m) 39°08′40″N 77°41′30″W / 39.1445587°N 77.6916969°W / 39.1445587; -77.6916969 (Berlin Turnpike (VA Route 287) underpass of VA Route 7)
Purcellville Train Station Town of Purcellville 44.8 miles (72.1 km) 564 feet (172 m) 39°08′18″N 77°42′58″W / 39.138441°N 77.716116°W / 39.138441; -77.716116 (Purcellville Train Station)
End of trail Town of Purcellville 44.8 miles (72.1 km) 564 feet (172 m) 39°08′19″N 77°42′59″W / 39.138561°N 77.716250°W / 39.138561; -77.716250 (End of W&OD Trail)

History of the regional park[edit]

When the W&OD Railroad closed in 1968, its 100 feet (30.5 m) wide right-of-way extended from Potomac Yard in Alexandria to the center of Purcellville. Soon after the railroad closed, the Virginia Department of Highways purchased the railroad's property from the line's owner, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, with the intent of using a portion of the right-of-way for the construction of I-66.[20][21] In the same year that the railroad closed, the Virginia Electric and Power Company (VEPCO) (part of which was incorporated into Dominion Virginia Power in 2000)[22] purchased most of the property from the highway department, as the company's electric power transmission lines were travelling within the right-of-way.[23]

The first portion of the W&OD Trail opened in 1974 within the City of Falls Church under a lease agreement between the City government, the power company and the NVRPA.[24] The 1.5 miles (2.4 km) section was intended to be a test of the trail's concept. As the trail proved to be popular, the NVRPA purchased this and additional segments of the right-of-way from the power company between 1978 and 1982 after reaching an agreement with the company in late 1977.[25] The power company retained an easement that permitted the company to maintain its lines and to extend them along the right-of-way if needed.

The NVRPA was not able to acquire from the power company the portion of the right-of-way that lay within the City of Alexandria. The NVRPA also could not acquire the portion of right-of-way that the highway department had retained for construction of I-66 near East Falls Church in Arlington and various portions of the right-of-way that contained existing or potential highway crossings.

The NVRPA extended the trail east and west of Falls Church as it acquired portions of the right-of-way.[26] In 1979, the trail was extended 26 miles (42 km) westward from Falls Church to Goose Creek, although it was only paved as far as Virginia State Route 123 in Vienna - a distance of 6 miles (10 km). Beyond that it was only suitable for hiking.[27] In 1981, the trail was paved from Vienna to Herndon and a 22 miles (35 km) section from Herndon to Leesburg was opened as a gravel path.[28] In 1982, the NVRPA completed a trail underpass at the Route 15 bypass east of Leesburg, increasing the trail's total distance to over 30 miles (48 km). The trail's route west of Leesburg remained accessible only by foot.[29]

In 1983, as part of the construction of I-66, the trail was extended and paved eastward from Falls Church to Patrick Henry Drive in Arlington. During that same time period, the NVRPA paved the easternmost section of trail from Shirlington Road to Columbia Pike in Arlington, with work beginning in 1982.[29][30] In 1984, the NVRPA paved most of the remaining Arlington section, from I-66 to Columbia Pike, two weeks after the NVRPA completed a trail extension that traveled westward from Herndon to Sterling. In 1985, the paved portion of the trail was extended through Leesburg.[31] The paved trail reached its western terminus in Purcellville in 1988.[26] In 1990, a trail bridge was constructed over Virginia State Route 28 in eastern Loudoun County as part of a project to widen the road.[32][33]

In 2002, the NVRPA constructed the final section of the trail in and near Arlington's Bluemont Park after encountering opposition from the public because of the paved section's likely environmental impacts. The final section traveled between the W&OD Trail's intersection with the Bluemont Junction Trail and a new trail bridge over Four Mile Run, passing under a bridge carrying North Carlin Springs Road over the Run.[34]

On October 20, 2007, construction began for a paved trail that would connect the W&OD Trail at its origin with the Four Mile Run Trail by traveling for 3,000 feet (914 m) along a bank of the Run while passing beneath the Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway (I-395) in Alexandria and West Glebe Road in Arlington.[35] On May 30, 2009, a ribbon-cutting ceremony heralded the completion and opening of the connecting trail.[9][36] In 2017, a bridge carrying Belmont Ridge Road (Virginia State Route 659) over the W&OD Trail was constructed in Loudoun County as part of a project to widen the road.[37]

In 1987, the National Park Service designated the trail as a National Recreation Trail.[38] In February 1999, the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR) determined that the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Historic District (DHR No. 053-0276) was eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.[39]

There have been formal plans to extend the trail west to Bluemont and the Appalachian Trail since the 1980s.[32][40] Loudoun County's 2003 Bicycle and Pedestrian Mobility Master Plan and Virginia's 2013 and 2018 Outdoors Plans recommend such extensions.[41] As difficulties in identifying a route and acquiring land have prevented construction of a trail along the W&OD Railroad's abandoned right-of-way west of Purcellville, the Loudoun County government is no longer considering such a route.[42] Instead, the county government is now planning to construct a new trail that will travel between Purcellville and Round Hill along Virginia State Route 7 (Business) (see: Future Plans in Loudoun County).

Historic structures in the regional park[edit]

Purcellville Station, August 2008

The park and its immediate surroundings contain a number of historic structures, some of which date to the pre-Civil War period.[21] Most of these structures are railroad remnants, including intact stations[43] at Vienna,[44][45] Sunset Hills,[46] Herndon,[47] Hamilton[48] and Purcellville,[49][50][51] stone arches and culverts,[52] the piers and abutments of bridges, and a relocated passenger shelter (formerly at Clarks Gap; now at Paeonian Springs).[53]

Part of the reinforced concrete floor of a brick electrical substation that the railroad constructed in 1912 to help supply power to its new electric locomotives and trolley cars is visible in Arlington County's Bluemont Junction Railroad Display south of Wilson Boulevard.[54] The floor is located in the space between a soccer field and a Southern Railway caboose.[55][56]

A remnant of a coal trestle stands south of the W&OD Trail, west of the trail's crossing of Lee Highway (U.S. Route 29) in Arlington. In June 2014, the owner of a property adjacent to the regional park demolished part of the structure to provide space for a planned self-storage facility. At the time, the Arlington County government was considering a proposal to designate the structure as a local historic district. In September 2014, the Arlington County Board designated the remaining portion of trestle, which was located on NVRPA property, as a local historic district.[57] The trestle was once adjacent to the west side of the railroad's Falls Church (East Falls Church) station, which was dismantled after the railroad closed.

A white metallic marker post lettered in black with the words "Station 1 Mile" stands on the north side of the trail west of Little Falls Road near the boundary between Arlington and Falls Church. This post, which once stood next to the W&OD Railroad's tracks, is one mile (1.6 km) east of the site of the railroad's demolished West Falls Church Station.[58] The station was located near the east side of the railroad's crossing of W. Broad Street (VA Route 7) in Falls Church.

Concrete abutment of the bridge that carried the Washington-Virginia Railway over the W&OD Railroad near the east end of Vienna (December 2006)

Near the east end of Vienna, the poured concrete abutment of a bridge that carried an interurban trolley line, the Washington-Virginia Railway, over the W&OD Railroad remains on the north side of the trail.[59] An inscription showing the month and year of the abutment's construction (July 1904) is visible on the structure's east side.

The trail crosses Goose Creek in Loudoun County on a span that NVRPA built on top of the piers and abutments of the highest and longest (268 feet (82 m)) bridge that the railroad constructed within the present boundaries of the regional park.[59][60] Visitors can view these remnants and the intact span, pier and abutments of the railroad's deck girder bridge over Sycolin Creek from unpaved paths that travel between the streams in NVRPA's Two Creeks Trail Area on the north side of the trail.[61][62]

The Sycolin Creek bridge bears the only remaining span that once carried trains of the W&OD Railroad. As the trail travels on the concrete deck of the bridge, visitors can only see the span and the structures below if they leave the trail.[62]

The piers and abutments of the railroad's bridge over Tuscarora Creek are visible south of the trail near the east end of Leesburg. The bridge was the second longest (149 feet (45 m)) that the railroad built within the present boundaries of the regional park.[59] The piers and abutments are the only ones along the trail's route that do not presently support a bridge.

Remnants of the facilities of a 19th-century lime company are visible in Leesburg on the northeast side of the trail, southeast of Harrison Street SE. Limestone (calcium carbonate) from a company quarry was mixed with coal and burned in a nearby kiln that was adjacent to the railroad's tracks. Quicklime (calcium oxide) was brought out of the kiln through two arched openings that visitors can see from the trail. The company also supplied farmers with agricultural lime and provided builders with lime plaster for walls and stone for roads.[63]

Near the saddle point of Clarks Gap, a stone arch crosses over the trail. Constructed around 1867-1868 soon after the end of the Civil War, the masonry arch once carried the original VA Route 7 over the railroad's tracks at the railroad's highest point.[59][64] The arch now carries Dry Mill Road (VA Route 699) over the trail.

A registration form prepared to support the nomination of the park for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places contains an in-depth description of the park's historical resources and of the railroad's history, as well as maps that show the locations of the park's major historical features.[65] The form states that the park is eligible for listing on the Register because its property "is associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history."[66]

Displays and museums along the W&OD Trail[edit]

The Norfolk Southern Railway and its predecessors have donated three cabooses for display along the W&OD Trail.[67] While none of these resemble the cabooses that once travelled along the route of the W&OD Railroad, two of the three cars house exhibits of materials relating to the W&OD Railroad and Trail.

A Southern Railway bay window caboose within the Bluemont Junction Railroad Display in Arlington exhibits photographs, maps and other information related to the County's railroads and trolleys.[68][69] Staffed by a County park ranger, the caboose is open to the public on weekend afternoons from the Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day.[70] The display also contains outdoor signage and photographs that describe and illustrate the history of the W&OD Railroad and of its junction that once operated at the site of the exhibit, as well as a metallic crossbuck and a metallic marker post that was once located 1 mile (1.6 km) from a station.[55][68][71]

Herndon Depot Museum in August 2012

A cupola caboose near the Trail in Vienna Centennial Park contains a museum that houses materials that the W&OD Railroad once used.[72] Staffed by members of the Optimist Club of Greater Vienna, bearing on its sides the name "WASHINGTON & OLD DOMINION RAILROAD" and numbered 503, the caboose is open to the public during the afternoons on selected weekends and holidays. Near the caboose is a historical marker, an NVRPA information sign, a metallic crossbuck on a wooden post and a metallic marker post that was once located 1 mile (1.6 km) from a station.[73] A metallic white railroad whistle post with black markings is located in Vienna Centennial Park on the north side of the Trail between Church Street NE and the caboose.

Retired Norfolk & Western Railway caboose repainted and renamed to W&OD 504 after relocating to W&OD Railroad Regional Park near Herndon Depot Museum (August 2012)

Adjacent to the Trail in Vienna, the Freeman Store houses a museum of the town's history.[74] The museum contains maps, books and other materials that relate to the W&OD Railroad. Operated by Historic Vienna, Inc., the museum is open to the public during the afternoons of each week from Wednesdays through Sundays.[75]

The W&OD Railroad station in Vienna houses a museum and a model railroad layout. Operated by the Northern Virginia Model Railroaders, Inc., the museum displays materials that the W&OD Railroad once used and a model of the station as it appeared when steam locomotives stopped at the station. The model railroad and museum is open to the public during the afternoon of one Saturday of each month except June and August.[76]

The W&OD Railroad station in Herndon houses the Herndon Depot Museum, which the Herndon Historical Society operates.[77] The museum, which is open on Sundays from noon to 3:00 p.m. from March to mid-December, displays photographs and newspaper articles relating to the history of the Town of Herndon and the W&OD Railroad.[77] The museum also contains materials that the railroad once used. The museum additionally contains information about the history of a nearby Norfolk and Western Railway cupola caboose whose sides bore the name and logo of the W&OD Railroad and the number 504 in 2006.[78] A railroad whistle post is located near the caboose[79]

The W&OD Railroad station in Purcellville houses the Loudoun Visitors Center. The Visitors Center contains a W&OD Railroad historical display and hosts wine-tasting events. The Visitors Center is open from noon to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays from late April through October.[80]

View from Luck Stone Quarry overlook in March 2012

An overlook at the Luck Stone Quarry east of Goose Creek displays a large trap rock quarry.[81] This mineral provides bulk for concrete and macadam.

Natural resources of the regional park[edit]

Most of the landscaping in the park is left in a natural state to preserve green space and to provide wildlife habitat.[4] Some natural areas within the park are contiguous to larger natural areas in adjacent public parks, including those in and around the Sparrow Pond wetland,[82] Brandymore Castle[83] and Four Mile Run[84] in Arlington, Piney Branch and Difficult Run in Fairfax County,[85] and the confluence of Goose Creek and Sycolin Creek in Loudoun County.[86]

Park interpreters, local teachers, environmental groups and amateur naturalists use the park as a resource for plant and animal study. These groups have identified approximately 450 species of wildflowers and more than 100 species of birds in the park. Wildlife in the park includes mammals such as foxes, river otters and beavers, and reptiles such as turtles and snakes. A variety of hawks and owls and other resident, non-resident and migratory birds, both upland and aquatic, find habitat in the park.[4]

Transmission lines in the regional park[edit]

Transmission lines over W&OD Trail in Loudoun County (March 2012)

The W&OD Trail lies beneath a set of electric power transmission lines between its trailhead and the Dominion Virginia Power's Pleasant View Substation in Loudoun County southeast of Leesburg. The power company removes trees along this section of the trail to protect its lines, at times eliciting protests from members of the public and elected officials in the impacted jurisdictions.[87] Trees shade much of the remainder of the trail.

In 2004, Dominion Virginia Power announced plans to extend its transmission lines in Loudoun County above ground from the Pleasant View Substation northwestward along the route of the W&OD Trail.[88] In response, on November 15, 2005, the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted a resolution of continued opposition to the installation of the proposed transmission lines along the Trail.[89]

Citing the impending loss of trees along its trail, the NVRPA asked the public on December 13, 2005, to oppose Dominion Virginia Power's application for the transmission line project in hearings that the State Corporation Commission (SCC) was planning to conduct as part of its review of the project.[90] During 2005, 2006 and 2007, the NVRPA submitted testimony and briefs to the SCC that opposed the construction of transmission lines along the route of the trail.[91]

In January 2007, an SCC hearing examiner recommended the construction of an overhead transmission line that would follow a wooded segment of the W&OD Trail between Leesburg and Clark's Gap.[92] After the SCC ordered the examiner to consider construction of an underground line along that segment of the trail, the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted on June 5, 2007, a resolution that supported the location of the line along that segment only if the SCC required Dominion to "install the line underground at a minimum width with the least amount of impact".[92]

The SCC nevertheless approved on February 15, 2008, a transmission line route that would travel above ground for 1.8 miles (2.9 km) along the same segment of the trail.[93] The Commission's approval order stated that the SCC had adopted the Examiner's recommendation against underground construction "due to both the physical, and the cost to the ratepayers, of the impacts that would result therefrom."[93]

Less than three weeks later, on March 4 and March 5, 2008, the Senate and the House of Delegates of the Virginia General Assembly unanimously passed emergency legislation that ordered the SCC to approve the underground construction of the line along that segment of the trail as part of a statewide pilot program for the development of such types of transmission lines. Sponsored by Delegate Joe T. May (Republican - Loudoun),[94] the legislation exempted the project from any requirements for further SCC analyses relating to the impacts of the route, including environmental impacts and impacts upon historical resources.[95] The legislation went into effect when Virginia Governor Tim Kaine approved it on April 2, 2008.[96] Soon afterwards, the power company asked the SCC to approve construction of the underground transmission line in accordance with the terms of the legislation. The SCC approved construction of the underground line on May 28, 2008.[97]

The NVRPA expected the project to result in a significant loss of trees, as the power company planned to dig trenches on each side of the paved trail while installing duct banks to house its conduits.[98] Supporting the NVRPA's expectation, Dominion Virginia Power noted that the environmental impacts associated with underground cable installation in suburban and rural areas are significantly greater than are those of overhead line construction.[99] The W&OD Trail closed for a year in the project area while the power company constructed its underground lines. The trail reopened to the public in November 2010.[100]

Future plans[edit]

Arlington County and City of Falls Church[edit]

NOVA Parks has commissioned a feasibility study of widening the W&OD Trail or adding a parallel trail to it within Arlington and Falls Church because of high use at peak times. The study's author recommended that NOVA Parks make plans to construct a 16 feet (4.9 m) or 19 feet (5.8 m) wide trail within the two jurisdictions, while temporarily widening the trail to 11 feet (3.4 m).[101]

NOVA Parks has received a $3.2 million grant from the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority that enables it to expand a 1.2 miles (1.9 km) long trail segment within the City of Falls Church by late 2020. The expansion will convert the 11 feet (3.4 m) wide segment and part of its adjacent green space into a dual paved path containing a 12 feet (3.7 m) wide bicycle trail and an 8 feet (2.4 m) wide pedestrian trail. A 2 feet (0.6 m) wide median strip will separate the two routes, creating a 22 feet (6.7 m) wide transportation corridor that will be twice the width of the present W&OD Trail. The imperviously-surfaced trails will travel through a 16 acres (6 ha) urban open space that a 2016 Falls Church master plan calls "The City's Greenest Street". The master plan's "Vision Statement" states that the project will help "Develop the W&OD Park as a Great Street and greenway".[102]

The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) is presently constructing a W&OD Trail pedestrian and bicycle bridge over U.S Route 29 (Lee Highway) in Arlington County's East Falls Church neighborhood as part of its "Transform 66 - Inside the Beltway" I-66 eastbound widening project.[103] VDOT hosted several public meetings that provided information about the bridge, which has raised concerns among neighborhood residents.[104]In April 2019, construction began on the bridge, which VDOT expects to open during the fall of 2020.[105]

Loudoun County[edit]

To connect the terminus of the W&OD Trail in Purcellville to the town of Round Hill, the Loudoun County government has designed and acquired easements for a multiuse trail that will travel along East Loudoun Street (Virginia State Route 7 (Business)) between Round Hill and Franklin Park, east of Round Hill.[106] This trail will connect to a trail under design that will travel along West Main Street (Virginia State Route 7 (Business)) to connect Franklin Park and Purcellville.[107]

Gallery of W&OD Trail[edit]

Views along the W&OD Trail from east to west:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ (1) Description and map of W&OD Trail in NVRPA "Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park" marker at trailhead of W&OD Trail in Shirlington in Arlington County, Virginia. Photographs and description of marker in "Washington and Old Dominion Trail" marker Archived 2007-11-10 at the Wayback Machine page in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website] Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved March 28, 2008.
    (2) "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park (W&OD)". TrailLink. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Archived from the original on June 7, 2017. Retrieved June 7, 2017. (3) Uenuma, F. (June 19, 2008). "A Long Journey on the Trail: The W&OD Is Park, Path and Community, And Paul McCray Has Been the Man in Charge". Loudoun Extra. The Washington Post. p. LZ12. Archived from the original on June 23, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  2. ^ History of W&OD Railroad in NVRPA "Tracks into History" Archived 2007-11-10 at the Wayback Machine marker at trailhead of W&OD Trail in Shirlington in Arlington County, Virginia. Photographs and description of marker in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved March 28, 2008.
  3. ^ Neville, Section 7, p. 2.
  4. ^ a b c "Pre-Filed Direct Testimony of Paul E. McCray on behalf of Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority" (PDF). November 30, 2005. p. 6. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 28, 2017. Retrieved September 28, 2017. In NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - PRE-FILED DIRECT TESTIMONY OF MR. HAFNER, MR. MCRAY AND MR. SIMMONS, November 30, 2005, Part 1 of 5, page 37 of 59, Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
  5. ^ Titles of and links to webpages of many NOVA Parks historical markers along the W&OD Trail are listed in ""Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Historical Markers" series". HMdb: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  6. ^ "Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park". NOVA Parks. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  7. ^ a b (1) Photographs and description of the area and markers at the W&OD Trail's trailhead: Prats., J.J. (ed.). ""Washington and Old Dominion Trail" marker". HMdb: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
    (2) Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority historical marker at trailhead of W&OD Trail: Prats, J.J. (ed.). "Nauck: A Neighborhood History". HMdb: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
    (3) Meyer, Roger Dean (photographer) (September 9, 2007). "Three Markers at the Washington & Old Dominion Trailhead" (photograph). Washington and Old Dominion Trail. HMdb: The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved December 25, 2018. The three markers include Nauck: A Neighborhood History, Tracks Into History and Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Trail.
    (4) Coordinates of W&OD Trail trailhead: 38°50′39″N 77°05′09″W / 38.844269°N 77.085878°W / 38.844269; -77.085878 (W&OD Trail trailhead)
  8. ^ a b "W&OD TRAIL and FOUR MILE RUN TRAIL" (PDF). Arlington County 2005 Small Bike Map. Arlington County Department of Environmental Services. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2006. Retrieved June 11, 2008.
  9. ^ a b Announcement of May 30, 2009, ribbon-cutting ceremony commemorating the completion of a trail extension linking the W&OD Trail at its origin with the Four Mile Run Trail: "Arlington Enhances Scenic Four Mile Run Trail with New Extension: Ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate safety and aesthetic improvements". News Release. Government of Arlington County, Virginia. May 26, 2009. Archived from the original on May 29, 2009. Retrieved May 28, 2009.
  10. ^ "BLUEMONT JUNCTION TRAIL and W&OD TRAIL" (PDF). Arlington County 2005 Small Bike Map. Arlington County Department of Environmental Services. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2006. Retrieved June 11, 2008.
  11. ^ "CUSTIS TRAIL and W&OD TRAIL" (PDF). Arlington County 2005 Small Bike Map. Arlington County Department of Environmental Services. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2006. Retrieved June 11, 2008.
  12. ^ "N Sycamore St, W&OD TRAIL and East Falls Church Metro Station" (PDF). Arlington County 2005 Small Bike Map. Arlington County Department of Environmental Services. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2006. Retrieved June 11, 2008.
  13. ^ (1) "Station Vicinity Map: Wiehle-Reston East" (PDF). Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
    (2) Merry, Stephanie (August 14, 2014). "Riding the rails to trails: Metro offers a car-free path to the great outdoors". Going Out Guide. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 29, 2017. Retrieved September 29, 2017. Once you get to the Wiehle-Reston East stop, take the North exit, which guides you toward Reston Station Boulevard. Walk toward Wiehle Road and take a left, then cross over Sunset Hills Road. Once you see the Pizza Hut, you know you've arrived. .... (Note: Wiehle is a busy road and not particularly bike-friendly, but it's a short, manageable distance from the station to the trail to walk your bike on the sidewalk.)
  14. ^ U.S. Geological Survey topographic map of Clarks Gap Archived 2012-10-12 at the Wayback Machine from website of TopoQuest Archived 2008-09-20 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed October 8, 2009.
  15. ^ Jurisdictions from "Map of the W&OD". The Friends of the Washington & Old Dominion Trail. Archived from the original on November 24, 2010. Retrieved September 29, 2010.
  16. ^ Distances from detailed maps of portions of trail accessed from "Map of the W&OD". The Friends of the Washington & Old Dominion Trail. Archived from the original on November 24, 2010. Retrieved September 29, 2010.
  17. ^ Height above sea level in feet at nearest 0.5 mileage marker from first table in "W & OD Trail Elevations". The Friends of the Washington & Old Dominion Trail. Archived from the original on August 28, 2010. Retrieved October 10, 2009.
    Note: Updated elevations at each 0.5 mileage marker and at other trail features are available at "W&OD Trail Heights Above Sea Level" (PDF). The Friends of the W&OD Trail. 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 21, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2016.
  18. ^ Coordinates from WikiMapia
  19. ^ Height above sea level from graphic map in "W & OD Trail Elevations". The Friends of the Washington & Old Dominion Trail. Archived from the original on August 28, 2010. Retrieved October 2, 2009.
  20. ^ Harwood, pp.102-103.
  21. ^ a b Neville, Section 7, p. 4.
  22. ^ "Dominion History: Rebranding of Dominion". About Dominion. Dominion Resources. 2012. Archived from the original on September 14, 2008. Retrieved June 13, 2012.
  23. ^ Harwood, p. 103.
  24. ^ Harwood, p. 108.
  25. ^ (1) ""Washington and Old Dominion Trail" marker". Archived from the original on November 10, 2007. Retrieved March 28, 2008. page in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database] Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Accessed April 22, 2008.
    (2) Hodge, Paul (December 22, 1977). "Hiking and Biking on the 'Virginia Creeper'". Washington Evening Star.
  26. ^ a b Harwood, p. 109.
  27. ^ Hodge, Paul (October 18, 1979). "Trail Blazers: Celebration to Open 26 New Miles of Scenic Route: Celebration to Open 26 Miles of Trail". The Washington Post.
  28. ^ Hodge, Paul (May 7, 1981). "Happy Trails!: Park Service Throws a Party To Celebrate Upgraded Bike Path: Popular Bike Path Gets a New Face Lift". The Washington Post.
  29. ^ a b "Major Extensions Of Bike Trail To Be Celebrated". The Washington Post. September 22, 1982. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  30. ^ Hodge, Paul (December 22, 1982). "$2.5-Million Bicycle Path Along I-66 Wins Praise". Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  31. ^ Hodge, Paul (September 27, 1984). "Arlington Section of W&OD Trail Set to Open". Washington Post.
  32. ^ a b "The W&OD Trail Heads Towards The Mountains". The Washington Post. January 21, 1998. Archived from the original on September 11, 2016. Retrieved June 14, 2016.
  33. ^ Bates, Steve (November 8, 1990). "Trail Clears Hurdle". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 4, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  34. ^ (1) "BCA Opposes Bypass Trail Plan" (PDF). Bluemont Civic Association Newsletter. Arlington County, Virginia: Bluemont Civic Association. 2 (1): 2–3. July 1999. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 26, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2012. The Bluemont Civic Association voiced its opposition to a proposed bypass bicycle trail before a June 28 hearing of the Arlington County Environment and Energy Conservation Committee. .... The proposal is intended to divert high-speed bicycle and skater traffic from the W&OD Trail in Bluemont Park by constructing a parallel bypass trail on the opposite side of Four Mile Run. The bypass would begin at the intersection of the W&OD Trail and the Bluemont Junction Trail near the soccer field, run on the original W&OD railroad right-of-way under the VEPCO power lines. While BCA supports the concept of a bypass, we are opposed to the bypass as planned, due to the likelihood of significant environmental damage, the lack of a proper Environmental Assessment and the omission of key interested parties in the decision making process. As proposed, the bypass would virtually eliminate a meadow and could significantly disrupt Four Mile Run.
    (2) Donahue, William T., County Manager (October 4, 2000). "Memorandum to The County Board of Arlington County, Virginia: Approval of License Agreement With Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NVRPA) to Construct and Maintain a Section of the Washington & Old Dominion Trail Along with Related Improvements On County Owned Property (Bluemont Park) for the Public's Use". Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Government. Archived from the original on February 8, 2012. Retrieved June 13, 2012. The Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NVRPA) has requested a License Agreement (License) from the County to permit NVRPA to construct and maintain a portion of the Washington & Old Dominion Trail and related improvements in Bluemont Park where it crosses North Carlin Springs Road. ..... The proposed trail will connect the existing W&OD Trail from just south of Carlin Springs Road to the intersection of the W&OD Trail and the Bluemont Junction Trail, thereby providing an alternative for pedestrian and bicycle traffic from the Four Mile Run Trail through Bluemont Park. ..... The proposed trail would also connect the only unpaved portion of the W&OD Trail on NVRPA property along its 45 mile path from Arlington to Purcellville. ..... At North Carlin Springs Road, the proposed trail is on County property as it approaches and goes under the bridge at Four Mile Run. After crossing under the bridge, the trail reenters the NVRPA property, and crosses a new bridge to connect with the existing W&OD Trail. ..... The NVRPA has desired to connect the W&OD trail segments since the original construction of the trail. NVRPA's property adjacent to Bluemont Park is the last section of the railroad right of way to be developed with the trail. In the early 1990s, funding by NVRPA was proposed to be included in its capital budget and public discussion of the project was initiated. ..... Because of concerns about the environmental impacts of the project, the County Board directed that the trail connection be reviewed by the Environment and Energy Conservation Commission (E2C2), and that citizens and bicycle advisory groups be included in that review. ..... NVRPA has agreed to limit routine mowing along the new trail to three feet from the edge of the asphalt, to install a storm water detention facility, and to identify and establish alternate meadow sites both within the project area and elsewhere along the W&OD trail. NVRPA again reviewed alternate routes and determined that the suggested alternative routes would not resolve the safety issues and would have greater impact on the environment than the proposed route.
    (3) A ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new W&OD Trail section in and near Bluemont Park took place on May 11, 2002. See: "Washington & Old Dominion Trail Ribbon Cutting and Tree Planting, 9:30 a.m., Bluemont Park". News Release: Arlington to Celebrate Sixth Annual Neighborhood Day May 11. Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Government. April 29, 2002. Archived from the original on October 31, 2004. Retrieved April 22, 2008.
  35. ^ (1) "Arlington Kicks Off Work on New Four Mile Run Trail". News Release. Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Government. October 20, 2007. Archived from the original on February 14, 2012. Retrieved May 28, 2009.
    (2) "Construction Underway for Four Mile Run Trail Extension" (PDF). Four Mile Run Restoration Project e-Newsletter (November/December 2008). Government of the City of Alexandria, Virginia. 1 (5). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 12, 2010. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  36. ^ "Four Mile Run-Area Connector Trail Officially Debuts". Sun Gazette. October 30, 2009. Retrieved June 1, 2009.
  37. ^ Glick, Jenny (July 15, 2017). "Bridge over W&OD Trail to open ahead of schedule". WTOP. Archived from the original on July 17, 2017. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  38. ^ Washington and Old Dominion in National Recreation Trails Database Archived 2008-04-22 at the Wayback Machine in American Trails official website Archived 2008-04-29 at the Wayback Machine Accessed April 22, 2008
  39. ^ (1) "Transform I-66: Inside The Beltway: Eastbound Widening Environmental Assessment: Archeological Phase 1 Survey Report" (PDF). Virginia Department of Transportation. November 2016. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 23, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017. The Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Historic District (053-0276) was evaluated by DHR staff in 1999 and determined to be NRHP-eligible.
    (2) Neville
  40. ^ Bates, Steve (November 8, 1990). "Trail Clears Hurdle". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 4, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016. Park Authority officials first must decide where they want the trail extension to go. The linear park follows the right of way of the defunct Washington & Old Dominion Railway between Shirlington, near Interstate 395, and Purcellville. But the portion of the train line's old path that is west of Purcellville is privately owned and probably unavailable for the trail extension, park officials said.
    The agency said it may try to find a new path through the rolling hills or, more likely, it may try to persuade the Virginia Department of Transportation to let it use part of the right of way along Route 7, which connects Purcellville and Bluemont.
  41. ^ (1) "Table 5-1: Primary Roads and Connecting Corridors". Loudoun County Bicycle and Pedestrian Mobility Master Plan: Chapter 5: Recommended Bicycle and Pedestrian Network: C. Network Development Priorities. Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County Government. October 20, 2003. p. 47. Archived from the original on June 14, 2016. Retrieved June 14, 2016.
    #11: Round Hill- Hamilton: Business Rt. 7: Link Towns via their Main Sts: Round Hill, Purcellville, & Hamilton. Improves access to Franklin Pk, W&OD Trail & local schools: Bikeway/walkway facility design will need to vary throughout this long & diverse corridor. Intersection design & multi- modal traffic flow are key;
    #12: Clarke County-Round Hill: Rt. 7: Link W&OD Trail & Round Hill w/Bluemont & Appalachian Trail. ROW acquisition may be necessary; selecting a bikeway facility may require a study.

    (2) "Chapter 10 - Regional Recommendations: Region 8 - Northern Virginia: Regional Trails" (PDF). 2013 Virginia Outdoors Plan. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. p. 10.97. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2016. Retrieved June 14, 2016. Complete the connection between the W&OD Trail and the Appalachian Trail and the connection between the W&OD Trail and White's Ferry. Upon completion, the connection and the W&OD Trail will be an effective east-west axis, linking the Chesapeake Bay with the Appalachian Mountains and serving as an intercounty connector for existing and developing trails throughout the region.
    (3) "Figure 8.7: Virginia's Proposed and Existing State Connecting Trails" (PDF). 2018 Virginia Outdoors Plan: Chapter 8: Trails. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. p. 8.5. Archived from the original (annotated map) on February 6, 2018. Retrieved February 6, 2018. 8n: W&OD Connector
    (4) "Regional Featured Projects" (PDF). 2018 Virginia Outdoors Plan: Region 8: Northern Virginia: Chapter 13: Regional Recommendations. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. p. 13.47. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 6, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2018. Implement the Washington and Old Dominion trail plan.
  42. ^ "Park to Purcellville Trail Options Get Early Airing". Loudoun Now. Leesburg, Virginia. June 8, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2019 – via Electronic Ink of Leesburg, VA. About two dozen Purcellville area residents gathered at Emerick Elementary School on Wednesday night to learn more about plans to build a pedestrian and bicycle trail between the town and Franklin Park. ... County staff members are taking a new look at the concept after an earlier effort, about 15 years ago, ended without agreement on an alignment. At that time, planners had an idea to extend the W&OD Trail westward from its Purcellville terminus, but found the former railroad right of way had been abandoned and private landowners along the route unwilling to accommodate a new trial.
  43. ^ "Stations Still Standing in Remembering The W&OD Railroad". www.RailServe.com by Christopher Muller. February 14, 2007. Archived from the original on October 21, 2009. Retrieved August 5, 2010.
  44. ^ "NVRPA "Vienna Station" marker near Vienna near Vienna Station of W&OD Railroad". "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series. HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 26, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  45. ^ Wood, Rebekah K. (May 3, 2002). "Vienna Depot: Description and Historical Significance: Vienna, Virginia. Prepared for the nomination of the Vienna Depot to the National Register of Historic Places". Washington & Old Dominion Railroad, 1847 to 1968: A Photographic History, by Paul McCray. Archived from the original on January 22, 2016. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  46. ^ NVRPA "Sunset Hills" marker Archived 2015-12-26 at the Wayback Machine near Sunset Hills Station of W&OD Railroad in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  47. ^ NVRPA "Herndon Station" marker Archived 2015-12-27 at the Wayback Machine near Herndon Station of W&OD Railroad in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved March 28, 2008.
  48. ^ NVRPA "Hamilton Station" marker Archived 2015-12-27 at the Wayback Machine near Hamilton Station of W&OD Railroad in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  49. ^ Kalbian, Maral S; Peters, Margaret T. (November 20, 2009). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form (United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service): Purcellville Train Station" (PDF). Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 23, 2010. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  50. ^ Director, National Park Service (June 4, 2010). "Weekly list of actions taken on properties for the National Register of Historic Places: 5/24/10 through 5/28/10". U.S. Department of the Interior: National Park Service. Archived from the original on August 30, 2010. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  51. ^ (1) NVRPA "Purcellville Station" marker Archived 2015-12-27 at the Wayback Machine near Purcellville Station of W&OD Railroad in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved March 28, 2008.
    (2) "Purcellville Train Station". Town of Purcellville, Virginia. Archived from the original on March 3, 2011. Retrieved April 2, 2008.
    (3) "Preserving the Train Depot". Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved January 21, 2010.. Published by "Purcellville Preservation Association". Archived from the original on July 5, 2008..
  52. ^ Undated photograph of stone arch culvert under W&OD Trail west of Simpson Circle near Paeonian Springs
  53. ^ (1) McCray, Paul. "Paeonian Springs Station". Washington & Old Dominion Railroad 1847 to 1968: A Photographic History. Paul McCray. Archived from the original on October 3, 2013. Retrieved November 18, 2011. The Paeonian Springs Station was located approximately where the small passenger shelter now sits next to the trail in the community of Paeonian Springs. The shelter was originally located at Clarks Gap and was built from pieces of the larger, demolished Clarks Gap station.
    (2) Photograph entitled "Marker in front of the Shelter Along the Trail" showing passenger shelter and "Additional comment" dated 2008-01-29 in "Paeonian Springs Station marker". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. January 29, 2008. Archived from the original on December 26, 2015. Retrieved November 18, 2011. In 2006, the shelter along the trail at the site of the former Paeonian Springs station contained on its rear wall a sheet of paper within a plastic cover. The sheet described the history of the shelter. The sheet stated that the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad constructed the shelter at the site of the Clarkes Gap station on Dry Mill Road after the Clarkes Gap station burned down. According to the sheet, a railroad employee who lived in Paeonian Springs preserved the shelter. The sheet further stated that the employee's family had donated the shelter to the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
  54. ^ (1) Swain, Craig (November 11, 2009). "Photograph of electrical substation floor at Bluemont Junction". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved August 18, 2010.
    (2) Description of "Electric Power House" in Swain, Craig (November 11, 2009). "Bluemont Junction, ca. 1934, historical marker: front". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved August 18, 2010.
    (3) Description and photograph of electrical substation at Bluemont Junction in Harwood, pp. 48, 105.
  55. ^ a b Bird's eye satellite image of Bluemont Junction Railroad Display: Fernie, Steve (January 15, 2010). "Caboose at Bluemont Junction". Virtual Globetrotting]. Archived from the original on September 11, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  56. ^ Coordinates of electrical substation floor in Bluemont Junction Railroad Display: 38°52′23″N 77°07′57″W / 38.872958°N 77.132521°W / 38.872958; -77.132521 (Electrical substation floor in Bluemont Junction Railroad Display)
  57. ^ (1) Liebertz, John. Arlington County Register of Historic Places: Historic District Designation Form: Benjamin Elliott's Coal Trestle. p. 2. in County Manager, Arlington County, Virginia (September 12, 2014). "Board Report: Historic District Designation of and Design Guidelines for Benjamin Elliott's Coal Trestle, located on the southern side of the Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) Trail near the southwestern corner of Lee Highway and Fairfax Drive, adjacent to the northern property line of 6873 Lee Highway, and which district boundary shall include only the trestle structure itself in the portion of the parcel identified as RPC #11-065-001". County Board Agenda Item 50: Meeting of September 20, 2014. Government of Arlington County, Virginia. Archived from the original on October 30, 2014. Retrieved October 28, 2018.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    (2) Rothstein, Ethan (June 6, 2014). "Part of W&OD Railroad Torn Down for Storage Facility". ARLnow. Archived from the original on June 13, 2014. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
    (3) Sullivan, Patricia (June 11, 2014). "Landowner removes remnants of Arlington's industrial past for self-storage units". Local. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on June 11, 2018. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
    (4) Rothstein, Ethan (June 13, 2014). "W&OD Trestle Could Get Historic Designation". ARLnow. Archived from the original on June 16, 2014. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
    (5) "Video recording of approval of consent agenda, including agenda item 50: Historic District Designation of and Design Guidelines for Benjamin Elliott's Coal Trestle, located on the southern side of the Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) Trail near the southwestern corner of Lee Highway and Fairfax Drive, adjacent to the northern property line of 6873 Lee Highway, and which district boundary shall include only the trestle structure itself in the portion of the parcel identified as RPC #11-065-001". Arlington County Board meeting of September 20, 2014. Government of Arlington County, Virginia. September 20, 2014. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  58. ^ NVRPA "West Falls Church Station" Archived 2007-11-10 at the Wayback Machine marker at former site of West Falls Church station of W&OD Railroad in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved March 28, 2008.
  59. ^ a b c d Neville, Section 7, p. 5.
  60. ^ Description and 1960 photograph of Goose Creek bridge in Williams, Appendix II, Bridges and Structures.
  61. ^ (1) "Two Creeks Trail Area" (PDF). Loudoun Outdoors Guide. Piedmont Environmental Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 22, 2013. Retrieved December 27, 2013.
    (2) Description and 1972 photograph of Sycolin Creek bridge in Williams, Appendix II, Bridges and Structures.
    (3) 2007 photograph of trail bridge over Goose Creek Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine in Swain, Craig (photographer) (August 11, 2007). "Goose Creek Bridge". Photograph number 4 in "Diesel Trains on the W&OD" marker. HMdb: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 27, 2015. Retrieved December 25, 2015. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |work= (help)
    (4) Undated photograph of trail bridge over Goose Creek
    (5) Coordinates of path to view of piers and abutments of former railroad bridge over Goose Creek: 39°04′13″N 77°31′12″W / 39.070235°N 77.520037°W / 39.070235; -77.520037 (Trail to view of piers and abutments of former railroad bridge over Goose Creek)
    (6) Coordinates of path to view of span, piers and abutments of former railroad bridge over Sycolin Creek: 39°04′20″N 77°31′23″W / 39.07209°N 77.523018°W / 39.07209; -77.523018 (Trail to view of span, piers and abutments of former railroad bridge over Sycolin Creek)
  62. ^ a b Undated photograph of trail bridge over Sycolin Creek
  63. ^ NVRPA "The Leesburg Lime Company" marker Archived 2012-02-27 at the Wayback Machine at site of lime kiln in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved April 3, 2008.
  64. ^ (1) NVRPA "Clarkes Gap" marker Archived 2015-12-27 at the Wayback Machine at former site of Clarkes Gap (Clarks Gap) station of W&OD Railroad in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved March 28, 2008.
    (2) Swain, Craig (photographer) (August 3, 2007). "Close Up of the Bridge, East Side". Photograph number 4 in "Clarkes Gap" marker. HMdb: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved December 25, 2015. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |work= (help)
  65. ^ Neville
  66. ^ Neville, Section 7, p. 3.
  67. ^ "A Quartet of Cabooses in Remembering The W&OD Railroad". RailServe.com by Christopher Muller. February 14, 2007. Archived from the original on November 27, 2011. Retrieved August 6, 2010.
  68. ^ a b NVRPA ""Bluemont Junction" marker". "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series. The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 27, 2015. Retrieved August 18, 2010.
  69. ^ (1) Wamsley, J. (2011). "Bluemont Junction Caboose". In and Around Arlington Galleries. SmugMug, Inc. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved February 28, 2016. Photographs of interior and exterior of caboose in Bluemont Junction Railroad Display.
    (2) "Photograph of Bluemont Junction Caboose". Bluemont Junction Park. Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Department of Parks and Recreation. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved September 1, 2016.
    (3) "Bluemont Junction Caboose". Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Department of Parks and Recreation. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2016.
    (4) consuarrider (February 8, 2009). "Bluemont Junction Caboose W&OD". consular rider's album. Photobucket Corporation. Archived from the original on February 28, 2016. Retrieved February 27, 2016. Photograph of Bluemont Junction Railroad Display.
    (5) Swart, Randy (2007). "Photograph of Southern Railway caboose in Bluemont Junction Railroad Display". Arlington History Ride: A Self-Guided Tour of Arlington, Virginia, USA, for Bikers and Hikers. Barcroft School and Civic League, Inc. Archived from the original on August 19, 2006. Retrieved September 1, 2016.
    (6) Swain, Craig (November 28, 2009). "Three Markers in front of an Old Caboose". "Bluemont Junction" marker. The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved August 4, 2011. Photograph of caboose in Bluemont Junction Railroad Display.
    (6) Pyzyk, Katie (photographer) (February 21, 2012). "Photograph of one end of Bluemont Junction caboose". ARLnow.com. Archived from the original on May 10, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2012.
  70. ^ Trail sign near caboose, April, 2017.
  71. ^ (1) ""Bluemont Junction, ca. 1934", marker". "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Markers" series. The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on October 15, 2012. Retrieved August 24, 2010.
    (2) "Bluemont Junction Markers". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved August 24, 2010. List containing links to web pages for six historical markers in and near the Bluemont Junction Railroad Display near the W&OD Trail in Arlington County.
    (3) Bouchard, Elizabeth (November 12, 2010). "Bluemont Junction Caboose". All Around Arlington: #45 – Visit an old Southern Railway Caboose at Bluemont Junction. StudioPress. Archived from the original on April 26, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2016. Photograph of Southern Railway caboose, historical marker, shed and cross buck in Bluemont Junction Railroad Display.
    (4) "Bluemont Junction Park". Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Department of Parks and Recreation. Archived from the original on July 12, 2019. Retrieved July 12, 2019. Photographs of interior and exterior of Southern Railway caboose, historical markers and display of historical railroad photographs in Bluemont Junction Railway Display.
  72. ^ Photograph of Vienna caboose: Swain, Craig (July 2, 2007). "Photograph of Caboose #503". "Vienna Centennial Park" marker. The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on December 26, 2015. Retrieved August 4, 2011.
  73. ^ (1) ""Vienna Centennial Park" marker". The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012. Retrieved September 17, 2008. After repeal of the laws requiring manned cabooses in Virginia, the Norfolk Southern Corporation announced that it would donate cabooses to deserving organizations. The Town of Vienna received a caboose because of the importance of the railroad in Vienna's history and its plans for a Centennial celebration. .... Vienna's caboose was built in 1948 and weighs over 30 tons. It was renamed and renumbered as W&OD Caboose #503. Vienna Centennial Park and the caboose are within the boundaries of the W&OD Regional Trail right-of-way by permission of Virginia Power and the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
    (2) Informational booklet containing photographs of the existing caboose, crossbuck and "Station 1 Mile" railroad marker in Vienna Centennial Park and of a wood caboose bearing the name "Old Dominion" and the number 502: "Optimist Club of Greater Vienna W&OD Trail Caboose Museum". Optimist Club of Greater Vienna. April 27, 2010. Archived from the original on December 23, 2018. Retrieved December 23, 2018. How old is this caboose? Answer. W&OD #503 is a newer all steel model built for the Norfolk and Southern Railroad in 1948 and moved here in 1990 as a community project and re-designated W&OD #503 as part of the town centennial.
    (3) "Caboose Open House Schedule: 2017". Optimist Club of Greater Vienna. 2017. Archived from the original on June 2, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
    (4) Francis, Doug (May 2013). "Photograph of Vienna caboose, crossbuck and "Station 1 Mile" railroad marker". dougfrancis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  74. ^ Freeman Store and Museum marker Archived 2012-03-12 at the Wayback Machine page in Virginia Civil War Trails Markers series Archived 2011-06-10 at the Wayback Machine in HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database official website Archived 2011-03-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved September 17, 2008.
  75. ^ "Freeman Store". Historic Vienna, Inc. Archived from the original on April 15, 2012. Retrieved February 8, 2012.
  76. ^ (1) "Northern Virginia Model Railroaders, Inc". Vienna, Virginia. Archived from the original on October 13, 2018. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
    Swain, Craig (July 2, 2007). "Photograph of Vienna Station". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  77. ^ a b "Museum Information". The Herndon Historical Society. Archived from the original on December 23, 2018. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  78. ^ (1) "The Caboose". The Herndon Historical Society. Archived from the original on August 13, 2018. Retrieved December 23, 2018. In 1989, longtime Society member and railroad aficianado George Moore located a surplus Norfolk and Western caboose, arranged for it to be transported to Herndon, and coordinated with the Herndon Department of Public Works to install the section of track on which it sits. Located adjacent to the W&OD trail—formerly the W&OD railroad line—the caboose serves as a reminder of the town's rail history. Although the caboose is now the property of the Town of Herndon the Society continues to monitor its condition and to fund the interior maintenance. Following his death in 2003, the caboose was dedicated in George's memory. In 2008, the interior was restored and the windows were improved to make them water tight.
    (2) Prats, J. J. (March 10, 2006). "Photograph of Herndon Caboose". "Tracks into History" marker. HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on October 24, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2011.
  79. ^ Photograph of Herndon caboose and whistle post, by Richard A. Lipsky, Washington Post Archived 2009-10-29 at the Wayback Machine, Slide number 3 in Slideshow, in Fisher, M, "Slight Gap Where the Sidewalk Ends", Washington Post Archived 2001-02-08 at the Wayback Machine, Prince George's Extra section, Thursday, April 24, 2008, Page PG27. Retrieved April 29, 2008.
  80. ^ "Loudoun Visitors Center in Purcellville: Wine Tastings & Information". Loudoun Convention & Visitors Association (Visit Loudoun). 2016. Archived from the original on April 11, 2016.
  81. ^ (1) Paul McCray (former Manager, W&OD Regional Park) discussing Luck Stone Quarry overlook in Uenuma, F, "Two Decades Along the W&OD Trail", Washington Post video Archived 2012-11-05 at the Wayback Machine in Washington Post official site. Archived 2013-07-19 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved June 20, 2008.
    (2) "Leesburg Plant". Luck Stone. Archived from the original on May 26, 2012. Retrieved October 29, 2012.
  82. ^ (1) "DEDICATION CEREMONY FOR SPARROW POND WETLAND SET FOR AUG. 24". News Release. Government of Arlington County, Virginia. August 23, 2002. Archived from the original on October 19, 2006. Retrieved February 27, 2016.
    (2) Thurston, Steve (April 4, 2007). "Sparrow Pond Deluxe: Sparrow Pond Dredging and the Unfortunate Beavers". The Buckingham Herald Tribblog. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  83. ^ ""Brandymore Castle" marker". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  84. ^ Coordinates of natural area near W&OD Trail and Four Mile Run in Glencarlyn Park in Arlington County: 38°51′42″N 77°07′08″W / 38.861582°N 77.118831°W / 38.861582; -77.118831 (Natural area in Glencarlyn Park)
  85. ^ Coordinates of natural area near W&OD Trail and Piney Branch in Clarks Crossing Park in Fairfax County: 38°55′26″N 77°17′20″W / 38.923793°N 77.288926°W / 38.923793; -77.288926 (Natural area in Clarks Crossing Park)
  86. ^ Coordinates of natural area near W&OD Trail and the confluence of Goose Creek and Sycolin Creek in Two Creeks Trail Area in Loudoun County: 39°04′15″N 77°31′08″W / 39.070737°N 77.518898°W / 39.070737; -77.518898 (Natural area near confluence of Goose Creek and Sycolin Creek)
  87. ^ Chairman Connolly; Supervisors Smyth and Hudgins (July 26, 2004). "Joint Board Matter pertaining to clearance of vegetation near W&OD Trail". Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. Fairfax County, Virginia, government. Archived from the original on September 29, 2006. Retrieved February 27, 2016.
  88. ^ Slideshow: "Western Loudoun 230 kV Transmission Line Update, October 5, 2004". Dominion. Archived from the original on October 13, 2006. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  89. ^ (1) "Transmission Line Hearings". Week in Loudoun. Connection Newspapers. November 21, 2005. Archived from the original on March 10, 2016. Retrieved July 11, 2013.
    The Loudoun County Board of Supervisors has adopted a resolution of continued opposition to the installation of a proposed Dominion Virginia Power transmission line along the Washington and Old Dominion (W&OD) Trail. The resolution, adopted unanimously by the Board Tuesday, Nov. 15, also calls for continued support of underground construction as the preferred method of installation.
    The Board's resolution states that ″Loudoun County and its citizens will be best served and least damaged″ if the proposed transmission facility is placed underground and not on the W&OD Trail. Dominion Virginia Power has filed an application with the State Corporation Commission (SCC) to construct a new 230,000–volt transmission line in western Loudoun County, from the Pleasant View substation to the Hamilton substation.

    (2) Reyes, Denise, Deputy Clerk for the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors (November 15, 2005). "Copy Teste: DOMINION VIRGINIA POWER TRANSMISSION LINE FROM THE PLEASANT VIEW SUBSTATION TO THE HAMILTON SUBSTATION". Office of the County Administrator, Loudoun County, Virginia. Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County, Virginia, Government. Retrieved August 26, 2010.
    Whereas, Virginia Electric and Power Company d/b/a Dominion Virginia Power ("Dominion" or "Virginia Power") has caused to be filed an application (the "Application:") with the State Corporation Commission (the "Commission") for the installation of a 230kV transmission facility within Loudoun County between the existing Pleasant View Substation and a proposed substation to be located east of the Town of Purcellville (the "Hamilton Station"); .....
    Whereas, Loudoun County and its citizens will be best served and least damaged if the proposed transmission facility is placed underground and is not placed on the W&OD Regional Park (the "W&OD Trail") in any configuration; now, therefore,
    Be It Resolved that the Board of Supervisors of the County of Loudoun, Virginia, on behalf of the citizens of Loudoun County, will continue to oppose any installation of the proposed facility along the W&OD Trail; and will continue to support the underground installation of the proposed facility if it is to be located within the County or any independent political subdivision of the Commonwealth located within the County; and
    Be It Further Resolved that the Board of Supervisors will continue to work with the Town of Leesburg, other incorporated towns, state legislators, other stake holders, the Commission, The Virginia Department of Transportation and Virginia Power to achieve the purpose and intent of this Resolution, including the use of all legal means to ensure that any transmission facility is constructed in accordance with this Resolution
    [permanent dead link]
  90. ^ Buschow, Barry (NVRPA Board Member) (December 13, 2005). "Dear Friends and Supporters of the W&OD Trail: NVRPA open letter asking public to oppose transmission line project on W&OD Trail in Loudoun County". W&OD Needs Your Help Again. MORE - Mid Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  91. ^ (1) "NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - PRE-FILED DIRECT TESTIMONY OF MR. HAFNER, MR. MCCRAY AND MR. SIMMONS, Parts 1-5". Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. November 30, 2005. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved September 28, 2017. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
    (2) "NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - POST HEARING BRIEF, Part 1". Case No. PUE-2005-00018. Virginia State Corporation Commission. September 18, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 28, 2017. Retrieved September 28, 2017. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
    (3) "NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - POST HEARING BRIEF, Part 2". Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. September 18, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 28, 2017. Retrieved September 28, 2017. In Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
    (4) "NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - DIRECT TESTIMONY ON REMAND OF KATHERINE H. RUDACILLE, CHARLES SIMMONS, DONALD E. ZIMAR, JASON H. GART, AND STEVEN A. STUDABAKER, Part 1" (PDF). Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. June 15, 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2017. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
    (5) "NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - DIRECT TESTIMONY ON REMAND OF KATHERINE H. RUDACILLE, CHARLES SIMMONS, DONALD E. ZIMAR, JASON H. GART, AND STEVEN A. STUDABAKER, Part 2" (PDF). Case No. PUE-2005-00018. Virginia State Corporation Commission. June 15, 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2017. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
  92. ^ a b Reyes, Denise, Deputy Clerk for the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors (June 5, 2007). "Copy Teste: IN RE: PLEASANT VIEW — HAMILTON 230KV TRANSMISSION LINE". Office of the County Administrator, Loudoun County, Virginia. Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County, Virginia, Government. Archived from the original on February 28, 2016. Retrieved February 28, 2016.
  93. ^ a b (1) Peck, Joel H., Clerk of the State Corporation Commission. "A True Copy Teste: Final Order: Case No. PUE-2005-00018" (PDF). Pleasant View-Hamilton 230kV Line: SCC Approval Process: Final Order. Dominion. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 2, 2010. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
    (2) "Map of approved transmission line route" (PDF). Pleasant View-Hamilton 230kV Line: Maps: environmental study area and the route. Dominion. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 10, 2012. Retrieved June 13, 2012.
    (3) "State Corporation Commission Application Process". Dominion. Archived from the original on March 5, 2008. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
    (4) Section of W&OD Railroad Regional Park approved for transmission line route: From W&OD Trail Mile 36.2 at coordinates 39°06′51″N 77°35′50″W / 39.114029°N 77.597283°W / 39.114029; -77.597283 (W&OD Transmission line route at Trail Mile 36.2) to Trail Mile 38.0 at coordinates 39°08′15″N 77°36′33″W / 39.137417°N 77.609246°W / 39.137417; -77.609246 (Transmission line route at Trail Mile 38.0). Accessed March 21, 2008.
  94. ^ (1) "Website of Delegate Joe T. May". Archived from the original on February 27, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
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  95. ^ "Text of H 1319 (2008 Virginia Acts of Assembly -- Chapter 799: "An Act to establish a pilot program to place certain transmission lines underground.")" (PDF). Pleasant View-Hamilton 230kV Line: SCC Approval Process. Dominion. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 1, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2012. The Commission shall not be required to perform any further analysis as to the impacts of this route, including environmental impacts or impacts upon historical resources.
  96. ^ "Legislative history of HB 1319: "Underground transmission lines; pilot program established"". Virginia General Assembly. Archived from the original on December 27, 2015. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  97. ^ (1) Booth, Lisa S. (May 21, 2008). "Modified Request of Virginia Electric Power Company To Participate in Pilot Project, and For Approval of Underground Transmission Line Construction, Under Section 2.A of HB1319" (PDF). Dominion. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 2, 2010. Retrieved December 7, 2012.
    (2) Jagdmann, Judith Williams; Christie, Mark C.; Dimitri, James C. (December 1, 2008). "Pleasant View–Hamilton 230 kV Transmission Line" (PDF). First Annual Report on the Pilot Program to Place Certain Transmission Lines Underground. Richmond, Virginia: Commonwealth of Virginia State Corporation Commission. pp. 4–6. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 26, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
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  102. ^ (1) Benton, Nicholas F. (November 29, 2018). "$3.2 Million in State Funds OK'd to Turn W&OD Trail Into Bike, Pedestrian Lanes". Falls Church News-Press. Archived from the original on November 30, 2018. Retrieved December 22, 2018.
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  103. ^ "I-66 Eastbound Widening". Transform 66 - Inside the Beltway: About the Project. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Transportation. 2018. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
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    (2) Regan, Tim (January 27, 2017). "East Falls Church Residents Wary of Plan for Lee Highway Pedestrian Bridge". ARLnow.com. Local News Now LLC. Archived from the original on September 29, 2017. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  105. ^ "W&OD Trail Detours In Arlington Begin Tomorrow For Construction Of New Trail Bridge Over Route 29". VDOT News - Northern Virginia. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on July 12, 2019. Retrieved July 12, 2019.
  106. ^ (1) "Park to Purcellville Trail Options Get Early Airing". Loudoun Now. Leesburg, Virginia. June 8, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2019 – via Electronic Ink of Leesburg, VA.
    Construction is about to start on another trail project that will link Franklin Park to the Town of Round Hill. That work comes after a decade of planning.

    (2) "Active Project: Round Hill to Franklin Park Trail: Capital Projects Report" (annotated map with links to PDF files). Capital Projects Active and Planned in Loudoun County: Adopted FY 2017- FY 2023. Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County, Virginia, Department of Transportation and Capital Infrastructure. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
    This project designs and constructs a mixed use trail from the center of the Town of Round Hill to Franklin Park.

    (3) "Franklin Park". Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County, Virginia, Department of Parks, Recreation and Community Services. Retrieved February 6, 2019 – via Government Websites by CivicPlus.
    Franklin Park is a regional park in western Loudoun County. Its 203 acres of rolling hills harbor majestic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. .... The park opened on July 4, 1998, and offers a wide variety of outdoor activities.
  107. ^ (1) "Park to Purcellville Trail Options Get Early Airing". Loudoun Now. Leesburg, Virginia. June 8, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2019 – via Electronic Ink of Leesburg, VA.
    About two dozen Purcellville area residents gathered at Emerick Elementary School on Wednesday night to learn more about plans to build a pedestrian and bicycle trail between the town and Franklin Park. ..... Now, the planners are looking at a 1.1-mile route from the park’s swimming pool complex, following along Tranquility Road and then connecting with the sidewalk on Main Street at South 32nd Street. The main question is whether the path would be built on the north or south side of Rt. 7 Business/Main Street.

    (2) "Active Project: Franklin Park to Purcellville Trail: Capital Project Report" (annotated map with links to PDF files). Capital Projects Active and Planned in Loudoun County: Adopted FY 2017- FY 2023. Leesburg, Virginia: Loudoun County, Virginia, Department of Transportation and Capital Infrastructure. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
    This project provides funding to develop a trail alignment and preliminary design for a recreation trail from Franklin Park to the Town of Purcellville.

References[edit]

In Appendix K of NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - PRE-FILED DIRECT TESTIMONY OF MR. HAFNER, MR. MCRAY AND MR. SIMMONS, November 30, 2005 (Part 5), Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
In Appendix J of NORTHERN VIRGINIA REGIONAL PARK AUTHORITY - PRE-FILED DIRECT TESTIMONY OF MR. HAFNER, MR. MCRAY AND MR. SIMMONS, November 30, 2005 (Part 4), Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.

Cycling videos[edit]

See Also[edit]

External links[edit]

Maps and elevation tables[edit]