William John Sullivan

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John Sullivan
Johnsu01.jpg
John Sullivan at Free Software Foundation event, June 2006.
Born
William John Sullivan

(1976-12-06) December 6, 1976 (age 42)
ResidenceBoston, MA[1]
EmployerFree Software Foundation[2]

William John Sullivan (more commonly known as John Sullivan[3]) (born December 6, 1976) is a software freedom activist, hacker, and writer. John is currently executive director[4] of the Free Software Foundation, where he has worked since early 2003. He is also a speaker and webmaster for the GNU Project. He also maintains the Plannermode and delicious-el packages for the GNU Emacs text editor.

Active in both the free software and free culture communities, Sullivan has a BA in philosophy from Michigan State University and an MFA in Writing and Poetics. In college, Sullivan was a successful policy debater, reaching finals of CEDA Nationals and the semifinals of the National Debate Tournament.[5]

Until 2007, John was the main contact behind the Defective by Design, BadVista and Play Ogg campaigns. He also served as the chief-webmaster for the GNU Project, until July 2006.[6]

He has served as Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation since 2011.

As a speaker for the GNU Project[edit]

Matthew Garrett and John Sullivan at LibrePlanet 2016

John currently delivers speeches on the following topics,[7] in English:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sullivan, William John. "Contacting John Sullivan". Archived from the original on 2009-12-26. Retrieved 2010-02-24.
  2. ^ Contacting the Free Software Foundation
  3. ^ John Sullivan's home page
  4. ^ FSF announces new executive director
  5. ^ "NDT Results 1997-2005" (PDF). American Forensic Association. Retrieved 9 March 2011.
  6. ^ GNU's Webmasters - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
  7. ^ GNU and Free Software Speakers - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
  8. ^ Confusing Words and Phrases that are Worth Avoiding - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
  9. ^ High Priority Free Software Projects - Free Software Foundation Archived 2007-08-10 at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]