Grammy Award for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical

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Grammy Award for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality remixed songs
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 1998
Last awarded 2014
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical is an honor presented to producers for quality remixed recordings at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards.[1] Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

The award was first presented as the Grammy Award for Remixer of the Year, Non-Classical at the 40th Grammy Awards in 1998 to Frankie Knuckles. While the award was under this name, it was presented without specifying a work; when it shifted to its current name in 2002 works were named. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented "to recognize an individual(s) who takes previously recorded material and adds or alters it in such a way as to create a new and unique performance".[3] The prize is given to the remixer(s), not the original artist(s).[3]

French disc jockey David Guetta, British producer Jacques Lu Cont, and Skrillex have each won the award twice. Three-time nominees are Steve "Silk" Hurley and Masters at Work, although neither artist has won the award. American producer Maurice Joshua was put forward in 2001 and 2003, and won in 2004 for Maurice's Soul Mix of "Crazy in Love". Frankie Knuckles, David Morales, Roger Sanchez, Hex Hector and Deep Dish have each been nominated for the award twice and have won it once.

Recipients[edit]

A man wearing a white shirt and headphones at a mixing table
Three-time nominee Steve "Silk" Hurley
A man wearing a white T-shirt and bowler hat at a mixing table
2006 winner Louie Vega performing in 2009
A man with short brown hair wearing a blue T-shirt with "Von Dutch" written on it
2008 winner Benny Benassi in 2010
Two men, dressed in black, at a mixing table in a brick room
2009 winners Justice performing in 2011
A close-up of a man with medium-length brown hair and hazel eyes looking straight ahead
2010 and 2011 winner David Guetta
Year[I] Remixer(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1998 Knuckles, FrankieFrankie Knuckles N/A [4]
1999 David Morales N/A [5]
2000 Club 69 N/A [6]
2001 Hector, HexHex Hector N/A [7]
2002 Deep Dish "Thank You" (Deep Dish Vocal Remix) [8]
2003 Sanchez, RogerRoger Sanchez "Hella Good" (Roger Sanchez Remix Main) [9]
2004 Joshua, MauriceMaurice Joshua "Crazy in Love" (Maurice's Soul Mix) [10]
2005 Lu Cont, JacquesJacques Lu Cont "It's My Life" (Jacques Lu Cont's Thin White Duke Mix) [11]
2006 Vega, LouieLouie Vega "Superfly" (Louie Vega EOL Mix) [12]
2007 Lu Cont, JacquesJacques Lu Cont "Talk" (Thin White Duke Mix) [13]
2008 Benassi, BennyBenny Benassi "Bring the Noise" (Benny Benassi Sfaction Remix) [14]
2009 Justice "Electric Feel" (Justice Remix) [15]
2010 Guetta, DavidDavid Guetta "When Love Takes Over" (Electro Extended Remix) [16]
2011 Guetta, DavidDavid Guetta "Revolver" (David Guetta's One Love Club Remix) [17]
2012 Skrillex "Cinema (Skrillex Remix)" [18]
2013 Skrillex "Promises (Skrillex and Nero Remix)" [19]
2014 Cedric Gervais "Summertime Sadness (Cedric Gervais Remix)"
2015 TBA on 8 February 2015

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on October 27, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b "52nd OEP Category Description Guide" (PDF). National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. p. 7. Retrieved April 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominations". USA Today (Gannett Company). Retrieved April 29, 2011. [dead link]
  5. ^ Sullivan, James (January 6, 1999). "Women Dominate Grammys / Lauryn Hill leads with 10 nominations". San Francisco Chronicle (Hearst Corporation). p. 10. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  6. ^ "The Nominees for the Grammy Awards". San Francisco Chronicle (Hearst Corporation). January 5, 2000. p. 9. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  7. ^ Boucher, Geoff (January 4, 2001). "Grammys Cast a Wider Net Than Usual". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 13. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominations". The Seattle Times (The Seattle Times Company). January 4, 2002. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle (Hearst Corporation). January 8, 2003. p. 10. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominations". The Seattle Times (The Seattle Times Company). December 5, 2003. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Fast Facts: List of Grammy Nominees". Fox News Channel. February 13, 2005. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". San Francisco Chronicle (Hearst Corporation). December 9, 2005. p. 11. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  13. ^ "49th Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on November 8, 2009. 
  14. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominees". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 6, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Grammy Scorecard". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). December 3, 2008. Retrieved February 12, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Grammy Awards: List of Winners". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). January 31, 2010. Retrieved April 28, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Grammy Awards 2011: Complete nominees for 53rd Grammy Awards". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 28, 2011. [dead link]
  18. ^ "Nominees and Winners". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on February 1, 2012. 
  19. ^ "55th Annual Grammy Awards Winners: Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical". Archived from the original on June 1, 2013. 

External links[edit]