British princess

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
HRH The Duchess of Cornwall, daughter-in-law of The Queen.
HRH The Countess of Wessex, daughter-in-law of the Queen.
HRH The Princess Royal, daughter of the Queen.
HRH The Duchess of Cambridge, granddaughter-in-law of the Queen.
HRH Princess Beatrice of York, granddaughter of the Queen.
HRH Princess Eugenie of York, granddaughter of the Queen.
Lady Louise Windsor, granddaughter of the Queen.

This is a list of British princesses from the accession of George I in 1714. This article deals with both princesses of the blood royal and women who become princesses upon marriage.

The use of the title of Princess of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is entirely at the will of the sovereign. Individuals holding the title of princess are styled "Her Royal Highness" (HRH). Since George V's Letters Patent of 30 November 1917,[citation needed] the title "Princess" and the use of the style "Royal Highness" has generally been restricted to the following persons:

  • the legitimate daughters of a British sovereign,
  • the legitimate male line granddaughters of a British sovereign,
  • the wife of a British prince.

On 31 December 2012, Elizabeth II issued letters patent enabling all children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales to enjoy the princely title and style of Royal Highness, as opposed to only the eldest son.

Princesses of the blood royal and princesses by marriage[edit]

Under the current practice, princesses of the blood royal are the legitimate daughters and the legitimate male line granddaughters of a British Sovereign. They are dynasts, that is potential successors to the throne. For these individuals, the title "Princess of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" and the style "Her Royal Highness" is an entitlement for life. The title Princess and the style Royal Highness is prefixed to the Christian name, before another title of honour. From 1714 until 1917, the male-line great granddaughters of the Sovereign were titled "Princess of Great Britain and Ireland" with the style "Highness". Since 1917,[citation needed] the male-line great granddaughters of the Sovereign, have held "the style and title enjoyed by the children of dukes". For example, the daughters of the current Duke of Gloucester, a male line grandson of George V, are styled The Lady Davina Lewis and The Lady Rose Gilman.

Princesses by marriage are the recognized wives of the Sovereign's sons and male-line grandsons. Generally, these women are entitled to the style "Royal Highness" by virtue of marriage, and retain the style if widowed. However, Queen Elizabeth II issued Letters Patent dated 21 August 1996 stating that any woman divorced from a Prince of the United Kingdom would no longer be entitled to the style "Royal Highness". This has so far applied to Diana, Princess of Wales, and Sarah, Duchess of York.

Since the passage of the Royal Marriages Act 1772, there have been several instances in which princes of the blood contracted marriages in contravention of that act (which meant they were not legally married) and several instances in which the Sovereign withheld the style "Her Royal Highness" from a prince's wife deemed to be unsuitable. For example, Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, a male-line grandson of George III, married Sarah Louisa Fairbrother, in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act. Although morganatic marriage did not exist in British law, the duke's wife was never titled the Duchess of Cambridge or accorded the style "Her Royal Highness". Instead, she was known as "Mrs FitzGeorge". Most famously, George VI issued Letters Patent dated 27 May 1937 that entitled The Duke of Windsor "to hold and enjoy for himself only the title style or attribute of Royal Highness so however that his wife and descendants if any shall not hold the said title style or attribute".

The wife of a prince of the blood takes her husband's Christian name in her title as do all married royal women. For example, upon her marriage to Prince Michael of Kent in 1978, Baroness Marie-Christine von Reibnitz assumed the title and style of "Her Royal Highness Princess Michael of Kent". Similarly, upon her marriage to then Prince Richard of Gloucester, the former Birgitte van Deurs assumed the title and style of "Her Royal Highness Princess Richard of Gloucester".

The situation is slightly different when a woman is married to a prince who happens to be a peer or the Prince of Wales.[citation needed] Upon marriage, the wife of the Prince of Wales becomes "Her Royal Highness The Princess of Wales". Upon marriage, the wife of a royal duke (or earl) becomes "Her Royal Highness The Duchess (or Countess) of X". When Prince Richard of Gloucester succeeded to his father's dukedom in 1974, his wife became "Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Gloucester".

It has been traditional, and is still technically the case, that a princess by marriage cannot be called Princess and her first name. However, Diana, Princess of Wales, was so consistently referred to as "Princess Diana" that by frequent usage (at least in her case) it has come to be accepted occasionally in the media.[1]

History[edit]

The use of the titles prince and princess and the styles of Highness and Royal Highness for members of the Royal Family is of fairly recent usage in the British Isles. Before 1714,[citation needed] there was no settled practice regarding the use of the titles prince and princess other than the heir apparent and his wife. From 1301 onward, the eldest sons of the Kings of England (and later Great Britain and the United Kingdom) have generally been created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester. Their wives were titled Princess of Wales.

The title Princess Royal came into being in 1642[citation needed] when Queen Henrietta Maria, the French-born wife of Charles I, wished to imitate the way the eldest daughter of the French King was styled (Madame Royale). However, there was no settled practice on the use of the title princess for the Sovereign's younger daughters or male-line granddaughters. For example, as late as the time of Charles II, the daughters of his brother James, Duke of York, both of whom became Queens regnant, were called simply "The Lady Mary" and "The Lady Anne". The future Queen Anne was styled princess in her marriage treaty to Prince George of Denmark and then styled "Princess Anne of Denmark" once married. However, in exile at Saint-Germain-en-Laye the deposed James II gave the title of Princess Royal to his last daughter, Louisa Maria (1692–1712).

After the accession of George I of Hanover, the princely titles were changed to follow the German practice.[citation needed] The children, grandchildren, and male line great grandchildren of the British Sovereign were automatically titled "Prince or Princess of Great Britain and Ireland" and styled "Royal Highness" (in the case of children and grandchildren) or "Highness" (in the case of male line great grandchildren). Queen Victoria confirmed this practice in Letters Patent dated 30 January 1864 (the first Act of the Prerogative dealing with the princely title in general terms).[2]

On 31 December 2012, Elizabeth II issued letters patent enabling all children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales to enjoy the princely title and style of Royal Highness, as opposed to only the eldest son.[3][4]

Styling of princesses[edit]

Princesses of the blood royal[edit]

  • Daughter of a Sovereign: HRH The Princess N.
    • The style HRH The Princess Royal is customarily (but not automatically) granted by the Sovereign, when vacant, to the Sovereign's eldest daughter.[5]
  • Daughter of a son of a Sovereign: HRH Princess N of X, where X is the territorial designation of their father's senior peerage; e.g. HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent.
  • From 31 December 2012, daughter of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales: HRH Princess N of X.

When a princess marries, she still takes on her husband's title. If the title is higher than (or equal to) the one she possesses, she will normally be styled using the female equivalent.[citation needed] If her husband has a lower title or style, her style as a princess remains in use, although it may then be combined with her style by marriage, e.g. HRH The Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll or HRH Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone – if that princess had a territorial designation, she ceases its use. However, some of the lowest styles are not utilised by senior royals — Princess Anne remains HRH The Princess Royal rather than HRH The Princess Royal, Lady Laurence.

Princess by marriage[edit]

  • Wife of a prince who has a peerage: HRH The Duchess/Countess of X, or, prior to 1917, possibly HH
  • Wife of a son of a Sovereign, who has no peerage: HRH The Princess Husband.
  • Wife of another prince who has no peerage: HRH Princess Husband of X.
  • Prior to 1917, the wife of a prince in the third generation, who has no peerage: HH Princess Husband of X.

List of princesses of the blood royal since 1714[edit]

Granddaughters of monarchs must be by sons, not daughters (unless specified)
Unless specified title held from birth to death or present day
Title of Princess eliminated by Letters Patent issued 30 November 1917 (i.e. more remote than granddaughters of a monarch)
British Princess who died a minor
Title at birth Birth Death Lineage Comments
Princess Sophia of Hanover 1687 1757 Daughter of George I Gained title in 1714 upon accession of her father as George I.
Queen-consort of Prussia 1713–1740.
Princess Anne of Hanover 1709 1759 Daughter of George II Gained title in 1714 upon accession of her grandfather as George I.
Princess Amelia of Hanover 1711 1786 Daughter of George II Gained title in 1714 upon accession of her grandfather as George I.
Princess Caroline of Hanover 1713 1757 Daughter of George II Gained title in 1714 upon accession of her grandfather as George I.
The Princess Mary 1723 1772 Daughter of George II
The Princess Louise 1724 1751 Daughter of George II Queen of Denmark 1746-1751.
Princess Augusta 1737 1813 Granddaughter of George II Daughter of Frederick, Prince of Wales; Duchess of Brunswick 1780–1806.
Princess Elizabeth 1740 1759 Granddaughter of George II Daughter of Frederick, Prince of Wales
Princess Louisa 1749 1768 Granddaughter of George II Daughter of Frederick, Prince of Wales
Princess Caroline Matilda 1751 1775 Granddaughter of George II Daughter of Frederick, Prince of Wales; Queen of Denmark 1767–1772
The Princess Charlotte 1766 1828 Daughter of George III Held the title 'The Princess Charlotte' from birth and formally styled Princess Royal in 1789. Queen of Württemberg 1806–1816.
The Princess Augusta Sophia 1768 1840 Daughter of George III
The Princess Elizabeth 1770 1840 Daughter of George III
Princess Sophia of Gloucester 1773 1834 Great granddaughter of George II granted style of Royal Highness in 1816[6]
Princess Caroline of Gloucester 1774 1775 Great granddaughter of George II daughter of Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester
The Princess Mary 1776 1857 Daughter of George III
The Princess Sophia 1777 1848 Daughter of George III
The Princess Amelia 1783 1810 Daughter of George III
Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales 1796 1817 Daughter of George IV Death in childbirth left Kingdom without direct line heir
Princess Charlotte of Clarence 1819 1819 Granddaughter of George III daughter of Prince William, Duke of Clarence (later William IV)
Princess Alexandrina Victoria of Kent 1819 1901 Granddaughter of George III succeeded as Queen Victoria, reigned 1837–1901.
Title held until her accession in 1837 as Queen Victoria
Princess Elizabeth of Clarence 1820 1821 Granddaughter of George III daughter of Prince William, Duke of Clarence (later William IV)
Princess Augusta of Cambridge 1822 1916 Granddaughter of George III Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz 1860–1904
Princess Mary of Cambridge 1833 1897 Granddaughter of George III mother of Queen Mary
The Princess Victoria 1840 1901 Daughter of Queen Victoria Held the title 'The Princess Victoria' from birth and styled 'The Princess Royal' in 1841.
German Empress 1888 and mother of Wilhelm II of Germany
The Princess Alice 1843 1878 Daughter of Queen Victoria Grand Duchess of Hesse 1877–1878.
The Princess Helena 1846 1923 Daughter of Queen Victoria
Princess Frederica of Hanover 1848 1926 Great-granddaughter of George III Title from birth until 1917,[7] daughter of George V of Hanover
The Princess Louise 1848 1939 Daughter of Queen Victoria
Princess Marie of Hanover 1849 1904 Great granddaughter of George III daughter of George V of Hanover
The Princess Beatrice 1857 1944 Daughter of Queen Victoria
Princess Louise of Wales 1867 1931 Daughter of Edward VII Held the title 'Princess Louise of Wales' from birth, 'The Princess Louise' from her father's accession in 1901 and styled 'The Princess Royal' in 1905
Princess Victoria of Wales 1868 1935 Daughter of Edward VII Held the title 'Princess Victoria of Wales' from birth, 'The Princess Victoria' from her father's accession in 1901, held title until death
Princess Maud of Wales 1869 1938 Daughter of Edward VII Queen of Norway 1905–1938.
Princess Marie of Edinburgh 1875 1938 Granddaughter of Queen Victoria daughter of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh; Queen of Romania 1914–1927.
Princess Victoria Melita of Edinburgh 1876 1936 Granddaughter of Queen Victoria daughter of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh; Grand Duchess of Hesse 1894–1901
Princess Alexandra of Edinburgh 1878 1942 Granddaughter of Queen Victoria daughter of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh.
Princess Marie Louise of Hanover and Cumberland 1879 1948 Great-great granddaughter of George III Title from birth until 1917, daughter of Ernst August, 3rd Duke of Cumberland.
Princess Margaret of Connaught 1882 1920 Granddaughter of Queen Victoria daughter of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught
Princess Alexandra of Hanover and Cumberland 1882 1963 Great-great granddaughter of George III Title from birth until 1917, daughter of Ernst August, 3rd Duke of Cumberland.
Princess Alice of Albany 1883 1981 Granddaughter of Victoria daughter of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany
Princess Beatrice of Edinburgh 1884 1966 Granddaughter of Queen Victoria daughter of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh
Princess Olga of Hanover and Cumberland 1884 1958 Great-great granddaughter of George III Title from birth until 1917, daughter of Ernst August, 3rd Duke of Cumberland.
Princess Patricia of Connaught 1886 1974 Granddaughter of Queen Victoria Title held from her birth until 1919 when she relinquished her title and style upon marriage,[8] daughter of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught
Princess Alexandra of Fife 1891 1959 Granddaughter of Edward VII Title granted by Letters Patent of 1905,[9] daughter of Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife
Princess Maud of Fife 1893 1945 Granddaughter of Edward VII Title granted by Letters Patent of 1905,[9] ceased use of title after her marriage in 1923 although it was never formally relinquished, daughter of Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife
Princess Mary of York 1897 1965 Daughter of George V Held the title 'Princess Mary of York' from birth, 'The Princess Mary' on her father's accession in 1910, and styled 'The Princess Royal' in 1932
Princess Sibylla of Albany 1907 1972 Great granddaughter of Victoria Title from birth until 1917, daughter of Prince Charles Edward, 2nd Duke of Albany
Princess Caroline Mathilde of Albany 1912 1983 Great granddaughter of Victoria Title from birth until 1917, daughter of Prince Charles Edward, 2nd Duke of Albany
Princess Fredrica of Hanover and Brunswick-Luneburg 1917 1981 Great-great-great granddaughter of George III Title from birth until 1917, daughter of Prince Ernst August (III) of Cumberland and Hanover, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg
Princess Elizabeth of York 1926 Daughter of George VI Held the title 'Princess Elizabeth of York' from birth, 'The Princess Elizabeth' from her father's accession in 1936, until her succession in 1952 as Queen Elizabeth II
Princess Margaret of York 1930 2002 Daughter of George VI Held the title 'Princess Margaret of York' from birth, 'The Princess Margaret' from her father's accession in 1936, held title until death
Princess Alexandra of Kent 1936 Granddaughter of George V daughter of Prince George, Duke of Kent
Princess Anne of Edinburgh 1950 Daughter of Elizabeth II Held the title 'Princess Anne of Edinburgh' from birth, 'The Princess Anne' from her mother's accession, and styled 'The Princess Royal' in 1987
Princess Beatrice of York 1988 Granddaughter of Elizabeth II daughter of Prince Andrew, Duke of York
Princess Eugenie of York 1990 Granddaughter of Elizabeth II daughter of Prince Andrew, Duke of York
Lady Louise Windsor (disputed) 2003 Granddaughter of Elizabeth II daughter of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex; styled as an earl's daughter per her parents' wishes and the will of the Queen, Lady Louise is thought by some experts to nonetheless retain her princely status (see her titles and styles)

List of princesses by marriage since 1714[edit]

Unless specified title held from marriage to death or present day
Title of Princess where spouses title was eliminated by Letters Patent issued 30 November 1917 or Order in Council in 1919
Princess Birth Death Marriage Husband Comments
Princess Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach 1683 1737 1705 George, Prince of Wales Gained title by accession of her father-in-law as George in 1714 and held it until her husband's accession as 1727
Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha 1719 1772 1736 Frederick, Prince of Wales
Maria Walpole 1736 1807 1766 Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh
Anne Horton 1742 1808 1771 Prince Henry, Duke of Cumberland and Strathearn Gained title by her second marriage
Princess Frederica Charlotte of Prussia 1767 1820 1791 Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany
Duchess Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel 1768 1821 1795 George, Prince of Wales Held title until her husband's accession as George IV in 1820.
Duchess Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz 1778 1841 1815 Ernest Augustus I of Hanover Gained title by her third marriage
Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld 1786 1861 1818 Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn Gained title by her second marriage in 1818 and held it until her death.
Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen 1792 1849 1818 Prince William, Duke of Clarence and St Andrews Held title until her husband's accession as William IV in 1830.
Princess Augusta of Hesse-Kassel 1797 1889 1818 Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge
Princess Marie of Saxe-Altenburg 1818 1907 1843 George V of Hanover
Princess Alexandra of Denmark 1844 1925 1863 Albert Edward, Prince of Wales Held title until her husband's accession as Edward VII in 1901.
Princess Thyra of Denmark 1853 1933 1878 Prince Ernest Augustus, 3rd Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale Husband lost British title of Prince in 1917
Grand Duchess Maria of Russia 1853 1920 1874 Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh
Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia 1860 1917 1879 Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn
Princess Helena of Waldeck 1861 1922 1882 Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany
Princess Mary of Teck 1867 1953 1893 George, Prince of Wales Held title until her husband's accession as George V in 1910.
Princess Victoria Adelaide of Schleswig-Holstein 1885 1970 1905 Prince Charles Edward, Duke of Albany Husband lost British title of Prince in 1919
Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia 1892 1980 1913 Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick Husband lost British title of Prince in 1917. Princess Viktoria Luise was born Princess of Prussia being the only daughter of the German Kaiser Wilhelm II.
Wallis Simpson 1895 1986 1937 Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor See notes
Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon 1900 2002 1923 Prince Albert, Duke of York Held title until her husband's accession as George VI in 1936.
Alice Montagu-Douglas-Scott 1901 2004 1935 Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester When she was widowed in 1974 she was granted special permission to style herself as a princess suo jure.
Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark 1906 1968 1934 Prince George, Duke of Kent Princess Marina was a princess of Greece and Denmark by birth. However when she was widowed she reverted her title to Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent, styling herself as a princess suo jure in the UK.
Katharine Worsley 1933 1961 Prince Edward, Duke of Kent
Baroness Marie Christine von Reibnitz 1945 1978 Prince Michael of Kent Gained title by her second marriage
Birgitte van Deurs 1946 1972 Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester
Camilla Shand 1947 2005 Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Officially, she uses the feminine version of her husband's subsidiary title: Duchess of Cornwall.
Sarah Ferguson 1959 1986 Prince Andrew, Duke of York Lost style of Her Royal Highness and her position as a Princess upon divorce, and was restyled as "Sarah, Duchess of York.[10]
Lady Diana Spencer 1961 1997 1981 Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Lost style of Her Royal Highness upon divorce, and was restyled as "Diana, Princess of Wales". She was also a Lady (As a daughter of an Earl) in her own right prior to marriage.[11]
Sophie Rhys-Jones 1965 1999 Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex
Catherine Middleton 1982 2011 Prince William, Duke of Cambridge On marriage she became: Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge, Countess of Strathearn and Lady Carrickfergus.[12][13][14]

Notes[edit]

Each of the following women married a royal prince but as their marriages were invalid under the Royal Marriages Act 1772, they did not become princesses:[citation needed]

Although Wallis Simpson married the Duke of Windsor in 1937, and he was a British prince with the style His Royal Highness, having been confirmed as such by letters patent 27 May 1937 from his brother, George VI, Wallis and her descendants from the marriage were expressly denied the style of "Royal Highness" by the same letters patent.[15] As a duke's wife, she was always styled Her Grace The Duchess of Windsor.

There have been two instances where a British princess married a British prince:[citation needed] first The Princess Mary, daughter of George III, who married her first cousin Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh; and secondly Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife, granddaughter of Edward VII, who married her first cousin once removed Prince Arthur of Connaught. In the first instance Princess Mary was of higher rank and the Duke of Gloucester and his sister were elevated from the style His/Her Highness to His/Her Royal Highness. In the second instance Princess Alexandra had been granted the style Her Highness by her grandfather the King; as the wife of a Prince she received the style Her Royal Highness.

There is also the curious case of Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg, later Queen Victoria Eugenia of Spain (the daughter of Princess Beatrice and Prince Henry of Battenberg). Prior to her marriage to Alfonso XIII of Spain in May 1906, she was styled Her Highness Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg. On April 3, 1906, Edward VII, in order to elevate her standing prior to her wedding, raised her status to Royal Highness per royal declaration which read: "Whitehall April 3, 1906. The KING has been graciously pleased to declare and ordain that His Majesty's niece, Her Highness Princess Victoria Eugenie Julia Ena, daughter of Her Royal Highness the Princess Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore (Princess Henry of Battenberg), shall henceforth be styled and called "Her Royal Highness"; And to command that the said Royal concession and declaration be registered in His Majesty's College of Arms."[16] Edward VII concurrently issued a Royal Warrant on the elevation which read: "Our Will and Pleasure is and we do hereby declare and ordain that from and after the date of this Warrant our most Dear Niece Princess Victoria Eugénie Julia Ena, only daughter of Our most Dear Sister Beatrice Mary Victoria Feodore (Princess Henry of Battenberg) shall be styled entitled and called "Her Royal Highness" before her name and such Titles and Appellations which to her belong in all Deeds Records Instruments or Documents whatsoever wherein she may at any time hereafter be named or described. And We do hereby authorize and empower Our said most Dear Niece henceforth at all times to assume and use and to be called and named by the Style, Title and Appellation of "Her Royal Highness" accordingly. Given at Our Court of Saint James's, the Third day of April 1906: in the Sixth Year of Our Reign. By His Majesty's Command. M Gladstone"[17] Whether this made her a British Royal Princess is the subject of debate.

The former Lady Diana Spencer lost the prefix of Her Royal Highness upon her divorce in August 1996, and was restyled as "Diana, Princess of Wales". Buckingham Palace issued a press release on the day of the decree absolute of divorce was issued, announcing Diana's change of title, but made it clear that Diana continued to be a member of the British Royal Family. This was confirmed by the Deputy Coroner of the Queen's Household, Baroness Butler-Sloss, after a pre-hearing on 8 January 2007: "I am satisfied that at her death, Diana, Princess of Wales continued to be a member of the Royal Household."[18] This appears to have been confirmed in the High Court judicial review matter of Al Fayed & Ors v Butler-Sloss.[19] In that case, three High Court judges accepted submissions that the "very name ‘Coroner to the Queen’s Household’ gave the appearance of partiality in the context of inquests into the deaths of two people, one of whom was a member of the Family and the other was not."[19]

Common names[edit]

Of the above named princesses, there are a great number of shared names:

Others include Charlotte; Alexandra (and Alexandrina); Augusta; Elizabeth; Caroline; Sophie (and Sophia) and Matilda (Maud)

Wikipedia References[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.google.dk/search?q=princess+diana&oq=princess+diana&aqs=chrome.0.57j0l3j62l2.2620j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
  2. ^ Royal Styles and Titles – 1864 Letters Patent
  3. ^ The London Gazette: no. 60384. p. 213. 8 January 2013.
  4. ^ "Royal baby girl 'would be princess'". BBC News. 9 January 2013. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  5. ^ The Royal Family: Royal Titles. "Style and Title of the Princess Royal." - Royal.gov.uk Retrieved 16 June 2008.
  6. ^ Royal Styles and Titles – 1816 Letters Patent
  7. ^ Royal Styles and Titles – 1917 Letters Patent regarding the Royal Family
  8. ^ Royal Styles and Titles – 1919 Letters Patent
  9. ^ a b Royal Styles and Titles – 1905 Letters Patent
  10. ^ "The Royal Family". royal.gov.uk. Retrieved 8 July 2012. 
  11. ^ "Diana, Princess of Wales — Marriage and family". royal.gov.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  12. ^ "Styles and titles – The Duchess of Cambridge". The Royal Household. Retrieved 1 August 2013. Miss Catherine Middleton became Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge, Countess of Strathearn and Lady Carrickfergus. 
  13. ^ Rayner, Gordon (2 August 2013). "Royal baby: Duke and Duchess of Cambridge register birth of Prince George". The Telegraph. The Duchess is entitled to use the title Princess William of Wales, but has never described herself as such because the couple decided to be known as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge after the titles were conferred on them by the Queen on their wedding day. 
  14. ^ Rayner, Gordon (2 August 2013). "Duchess Kate: Princess of the United Kingdom (but you can call me mummy)". The Daily Telegraph. Although she has never used the name, the Duchess is entitled to refer to herself as Princess William of Wales, as well as being Countess of Strathearn and Lady Carrickfergus. 
  15. ^ Royal Styles and Titles – 1937 Letters Patent
  16. ^ News.webshots.com
  17. ^ Heraldica.com
  18. ^ "Inquests into the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Mr Dodi Al Fayed: Decisions of 8 January 2007". Butler-sloss-inquests.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 2007-10-30. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
  19. ^ a b "High Court Judgment Template" (PDF). Archived from the original on 25 June 2008. Retrieved 13 October 2008.