Jean-Pierre Jaussaud

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In 2009

Jean-Pierre Jaussaud (born June 3, 1937 in Caen, Calvados) is a French former racing driver, more famous for winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1978 and 1980.

Jaussaud started racing in automobiles in 1962, taking courses in the Jim Russell Drivers School and the Winfield Racing School. In 1964, he graduated to Formula Three racing, with backing from Shell, and joined the works Matra team in 1966, where he stayed for two years, and won the French title in 1970, in a private Tecno.

In 1971 he moved full-time to Formula Two in a works March, and the following year drove a privateer Brabham and fought for the European Formula 2 title with Mike Hailwood. In 1975 Jaussaud quit single-seaters and entered endurance racing, where he was invited to drive for Renault Sport starting in 1976. Two years later, Jaussaud and partner Didier Pironi won the 24 Hours of Le Mans race overall.

Although he tested the Renault F1 car, Jaussaud instead stayed in touring cars and endurance, winning the 1979 Production title in a Triumph Dolomite. Teaming up with Jean Rondeau, he won at Le Mans once more, and also took part in the Paris-Dakar Rally for Rondeau's team. Jaussaud continued racing until 1992, when he retired to become a racing instructor.

References[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Henri Pescarolo
Monaco Formula Three
Race Winner

1968
Succeeded by
Ronnie Peterson
Preceded by
François Mazet
French Formula Three
Champion

1970
Succeeded by
Patrick Depailler
Preceded by
Jacky Ickx
Hurley Haywood
Jürgen Barth
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1978 with:
Didier Pironi
Succeeded by
Klaus Ludwig
Bill Whittington
Don Whittington
Preceded by
Klaus Ludwig
Bill Whittington
Don Whittington
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1980 with:
Jean Rondeau
Succeeded by
Jacky Ickx
Derek Bell