John Taber

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
U.S. Representative John Taber early in his Congressional career
For 19th-century baseball player, see John Taber (baseball).

John Taber (May 5, 1880 in Auburn, New York – November 22, 1965 in Auburn, New York) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York.

He attended the public schools and graduated from Yale University in 1902 and from New York Law School in 1904. He was admitted to the bar November 15, 1904, and commenced practice in Auburn, New York.

Taber was supervisor of Cayuga County, New York in 1905 and 1906, special judge of the county court from 1910 to 1918, a delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1920, 1924, and 1936, chairman of the Cayuga County Republican committee from 1920 to 1925, and president of the Auburn Chamber of Commerce in 1922.

He represented New York in the House of Representatives as a Republican from the 68th to the 87th Congresses (March 4, 1923 – January 3, 1963), where he was the chairman of the Committee on Appropriations during the 80th and 83rd Congresses. He was not a candidate for renomination to the 88th Congress in 1962 because he was redistricted together with incumbent Democrat Samuel S. Stratton (elected in 1958).

Taber died November 22, 1965 in Auburn, New York, aged 85. He is interred there in Fort Hill Cemetery.

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Congressman John Taber of Auburn: Politics and Federal Appropriations, 1923–1962, Cary S. Henderson, Ph.D. dissertation, Duke University, 1964.

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Norman J. Gould
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 36th congressional district

1923–1945
Succeeded by
Clarence E. Hancock
Preceded by
Joseph J. O'Brien
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 38th congressional district

1945–1953
Succeeded by
Kenneth B. Keating
Preceded by
R. Walter Riehlman
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 36th congressional district

1953–1963
Succeeded by
Frank Horton