List of Anglo-Saxon saints

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The following list contains saints from Anglo-Saxon England during the period of Christianization until the Norman Conquest of England (c. AD 600 to 1066). It also includes other post-biblical saints who, while not themselves English, were strongly associated with particular religious houses in Anglo-Saxon England, for example, their relics reputedly resting with such houses or British saints of the Roman and post-Roman period (3rd to 6th centuries).

The only list of saints which has survived from the Anglo-Saxon period itself is the so-called Secgan, an 11th-century compilation enumerating 89 saints and their resting-places.[1]

Table[edit]

Name Century of death Origin Chief medieval resting place Notes
Acca of Hexham 8th Northumbrian Ripon / Durham / Peterborough Relics translated to Durham 1032; Peterborough Abbey possessed relic in the 12th century [2]
Æbbe of Abingdon 7th West Saxon Oxford Details uncertain [2]
Æbbe "the Elder" of Coldingham 7th Northumbrian Coldingham Translated to Durham in the 11th century [2]
Æbbe "the Younger" of Coldingham 9th Northumbrian Coldingham May be a doppelganger of Æbbe the Elder [3]
Æbbe of Thanet 8th Kentish Minster-in-Thanet Also called Eormenburh, of which "Æbbe" may be a hypocoristic form [3]
Ælfgar of Selwood unknown West Saxon Selwood forest Known only from 16th century source [3]
Ælfgifu of Exeter unknown West Saxon unknown May be Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury [4]
Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury 10th West Saxon Shaftesbury May be Ælfgifu of Exter [4]
Ælfheah of Canterbury 11th West Saxon Canterbury St Augustine's His body lay in London Cathedral from 1012 to 1023, but was translated to Canterbury with the cooperation of Cnut
Ælfheah of Winchester 10th West Saxon Winchester Old Minster
Ælfflæd of Whitby 8th Northumbrian Whitby
Ælfnoth of Stowe 7th Mercian Stowe forest
Ælfthryth of Crowland 9th Mercian Crowland
Ælfwald of Northumbria 8th Northumbrian Hexham
Æthelberht of Bedford unknown Mercian Bedford May be the same as Æthelberht of East Anglia [5]
Æthelberht of East Anglia 8th East Anglian Hereford
Æthelberht of Kent 7th Kentish Ramsey
Æthelburh of Barking 7th East Saxon Barking Remaining relics in Barking were translated to Canterbury in 1030 [5]
Æthelburh of Faremoutiers 7th East Anglian Faremoutiers
Æthelburh of Hackness 8th Northumbrian Hackness
Æthelburh of Kent 7th Kentish Lyminge
Æthelflæd of Ramsey 10th East Anglian Ramsey Wife of Æthelwine, Ealdorman of East Anglia [5]
Æthelburh of Wilton 9th West Saxon Wilton Allegedly foundress of Wilton Abbey and half-sister of Ecgberht,[6] king of Wessex and Kent, her existence is unsubstantiated by reliable sources [7]
Æthelflæd of Romsey 10th West Saxon Romsey
Æthelgar of Canterbury 10th West Saxon Canterbury Christ Church Cult attested in the resting-place list of Hugh Candidus [8]
Æthelgyth of Coldingham unknown Northumbrian Coldingham
Æthelmod of Leominster 7th Mercian Leominster
Æthelnoth of Canterbury 11th West Saxon Canterbury Christ Church Although both Mabillon and the Bollandists counted him as a saint, there is no earlier evidence of a formal cult [9]
Æthelred of Kent 7th Kentish Ramsey
Æthelred of Mercia 8th Mercian Bradney
Æthelsige of Ripon unknown Northumbrian Ripon Known only as sanctus Egelsi from a list of bishops resting at Ripon [10]
Æthelstan of England 10th West Saxon Malmesbury The saints cult of the famous English warrior-king is attested in a resting-place list, but is otherwise poorly documented [8]
Æthelthryth of Ely 7th East Anglian Ely Also called "St Audrey"[10]
Æthelwold of Farne 7th Northumbrian Various
Æthelwold of Lindisfarne 8th Northumbrian Lindisfarne Bones left Lindisfarne in the 9th century with the community of St Cuthert; some bones were given to Westminster by King Edgar [11]
Æthelwine of Athelney 7th West Saxon Athelney
Æthelwine of Coln unknown Mercian Coln St Aldwyn
Æthelwine of Lindsay 7th East Anglian unknown There is no evidence of an early cult, but he is listed as a saint in Wilson's Martyrologie[12]
Æthelwine of Sceldeforde unknown obscure Sceldeforde No identification of Sceldeforde is regarded as certain today [13]
Æthelwold of Winchester 10th West Saxon Winchester Old Minster
Æthelwynn of Sodbury unknown Mercian Old Sodbury
Aidan of Lindisfarne 7th Gaelic / Northumbrian Glastonbury Bones moved from Lindisfarne to Glastonbury during time of Viking invasions [14]
Alban 3rd Romano-British St Albans
Albinus of Canterbury 8th Kentish Canterbury Christ Church Evidence of cult comes from one resting-place list, but it is otherwise poorly documented [8]
Albinus of Thorney unknown Mercian? Thorney May be Hwita, bishop of Lichfield
Alchhild of Middleham unknown Northumbrian Middleham Possibly a daughter of King Oswig [15]
Alchmund of Hexham 8th Northumbrian Hexham
Alchmund of Derby 9th Northumbrian Derby
Aldatus of Oxford 6th Romano-British? Oxford / Gloucester
Aldhelm of Sherbourne 8th West Saxon Malmesbury
Alfred the Great 9th West Saxon Winchester King of Wessex and Bretwalda. Saint by popular acclaim only, never formally canonised. Relics were lost at the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
Amphibalus of St Albans 3rd Romano-British? St Albans Body at Aldeminstre in the Domesday Breviate resting-place list;[8] body 'discovered' at St Albans in 1178[16]
Arilda of Oldbury unknown Romano-British? Gloucester
Athwulf of Thorney 7th East Anglian Thorney
Augustine of Canterbury 7th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's
Avbur of Stallingborough unknown obscure Stallingborough
Balthere of Tyningham 8th Northumbrian Tyninghame / Durham
Balthild of Romsey 7th Frankish / East Anglian Romsey
Barloc of Norbury unknown British Norbury
Beda of Jarrow 8th Northumbrian Jarrow / Durham / Glastonbury
Bega of Copeland unknown Gaelic / Northumbrian St Bees
Benedict Biscop 7th Northumbrian Thorney
Benignus of Glastonbury unknown West Saxon Glastonbury Also called Beonna [17]
Beocca of Chertsey 9th West Saxon Chertsey 9th
Beonna of Breedon 9th Mercian Breedon-on-the-Hill
Beorhthelm of Stafford unknown Mercian Stafford
Beorhthelm of Shaftesbury[18] unknown West Saxon Shaftesbury Some possibility that he is a 10th-century West Saxon bishop, several bearing this name [19]
Beornstan the Archdeacon unknown Kentish Canterbury St Augustine's The saint-list "Catalogus Sanctorum in Anglia Pausantium" mentions an archdeacon called Byrnstan or Beornstan resting at St Augustine's [8]
Beornstan of Winchester 10th West Saxon Winchester Old Minster
Beornwald of Bampton 10th West Saxon Bampton
Bercthun of Beverley 8th Northumbrian Beverley
Berhtwald of Canterbury 8th Kentish Canterbury St Augustine's
Bertha of Kent 7th Frankish / Kentish Canterbury St Augustine's Mention in the resting-place list of Hugh Candidus [8]
Billfrith of Lindisfarne 8th Northumbrian Durham
Birinus of Dorchester 7th Roman Winchester Old Minster
Blaise 4th Roman Canterbury Christ Church Relics of Saint Blaise were held by Canterbury Christ Church, thought to have been brought from Rome in 908 by Archbishop Plegmund [20]
Blitha of Martham unknown East Anglian Martham Mother of St Walstan [17]
Boisil of Melrose 7th Gaelic / Northumbrian Melrose / Durham
Bosa of York 8th Northumbrian York
Botwine of Ripon 8th Northumbrian Ripon
Botwulf of Thorney 7th East Anglian Thorney
Brannoc of Braunton unknown British Braunton
Branwalator of Milton unknown British Milton Abbas
Ceadda of Lichfield 7th Northumbrian Lichfield
Ceatta of Lichfield unknown obscure Lichfield Possibly a duplication of Ceadda (above) [21]
Cedd of Lichfield 7th Northumbrian Lichfield
Centwine of Wessex 7th West Saxon Glastonbury In the list of saints entitled "Catalogus Sanctorum in Anglia Pausantium", he is listed resting at Glastonbury Abbey [8]
Ceolfrith of Monkwearmouth 8th Northumbrian Langres / Glastonbury / Monkwearmouth
Ceolwulf of Northumbria 8th Northumbrian Lindisfarne
Cett of Oundle unknown obscure Oundle
Credan of Bodmin unknown British Bodmin
Cissa of Crowland 8th East Anglian Thorney
Coenwulf of Mercia 9th Mercian Winchcombe
Congar of Congresbury unknown British Congresbury
Cotta of Breedon 8th Mercian Breedon-on-the-Hill
Credan of Evesham 8th Mercian Evesham
Cuthbald of Peterborough 8th East Anglian Peterborough
Cuthbert of Lindisfarne 7th Northumbrian Durham Bones originally at Lindisfarne, at various places including Carlisle, Norham, Crayke and Chester-le-Street, before settling at Durham in the late 10th century for the remainder of the Middle Ages [22]
Cuthburh of Wimborne 8th West Saxon Wimborne
Cuthflæd of Lyminster unknown South Saxon Lyminster
Cuthmann of Steyning unknown South Saxon Steyning
Cwenburh of Wimborne 8th West Saxon Wimborne
Cyneburh of Castor 7th Mercian Peterborough
Cyneburh of Gloucester 7th Mercian Gloucester
Cynehelm of Mercia 9th Mercian Winchcombe
Cyneswith of Peterborough 7th Mercian Peterborough
Dachuna of Bodmin unknown British Bodmin
Decuman of Watchet unknown British Watchet
Deusdedit of Canterbury 7th Kentish Canterbury St Augustine's / Leominster
Diuma of Charlbury 7th Gaelic / Mercian Charlbury
Domnanuerdh of Beckley unknown obscure Beckley
Dryhthelm of Melrose 8th Northumbrian Melrose Famous for the vision of the afterlife attributed to him by Bede;[23] evidence for cult limited, but he is mentioned in the resting-place list of Hugh Candidus [8]
Dunstan of Canterbury 10th West Saxon Canterbury St Augustine's
Eadberht of Lindisfarne 7th Northumbrian Lindisfarne According to tradition, his bones were taken from Lindisfarne in the late 9th century [24]
Eadburh of Bicester 7th Mercian Bicester
Eadburh of Pershore unknown Mercian Pershore possibly identified with Eadburh of Winchester
Eadburh of Southwell unknown Mercian Southwell
Eadburh of Thanet 8th Kentish Lyminge
Eadburh of Winchester 10th West Saxon Winchester Nunnaminster
Eadfrith of Leominster 7th Northumbrian Leominster
Eadfrith of Lindisfarne 8th Northumbrian Lindisfarne Tradition has it that his bones were taken from Lindisfarne in the late 9th century [25]
Eadgar of England 10th West Saxon Glastonbury
Eadgyth of Aylesbury unknown Mercian Aylesbury
Eadgyth of Polesworth 10th West Saxon Polesworth
Eadgyth of Wilton 10th West Saxon Wilton
Eadmund of East Anglia 9th East Anglian Bury St Edmunds
Eadmund the Confessor unknown obscure unknown Known only in the litany from Lambeth Palace MS 427, a 15th-century addition to a psalter of the 11th century [26]
Eadnoth of Ramsey 11th East Anglian Ely
Eadthryth of Grantham unknown obscure Grantham
Eadweard the Confessor 11th West Saxon Westminster
Eadweard the Martyr 10th West Saxon Shaftesbury
Eadweard of Maugersbury unknown Mercian Maugersbury / Stow-on-the-Wold
Eadwine of Northumbria 7th Northumbrian Whitby / York
Eadwold of Cerne 9th West Saxon Cerne Abbas
Ealdberht of Ripon 8th Northumbrian Ripon / Peterborough
Ealdgyth of Stortford unknown Mercian Bishops Stortford
Eanmund 8th Northumbrian unknown
Eanswith of Folkestone 7th Kentish Folkestone
Earconwald 7th Mercian London / Chertsey
Eardwulf of Northumbria 9th Northumbrian Breedon-on-the-Hill
Earmund of Stoke Fleming unknown West Saxon Stoke Fleming
Eata of Hexham 7th Northumbrian Hexham
Ecgberht of Ripon 8th Northumbrian Ripon
Ecgwine of Evesham 8th Mercian Evesham
Echa of Crayke 8th Gaelic / Northumbrian Crayke
Edor of Chertsey 9th West Saxon Chertsey
Elfin of Warrington unknown British Warrington
Eoda 7th Northumbrian unknown may be identical with St. Oda
Eormengyth of Thanet 7th Kentish Minster-in-Thanet
Eosterwine of Monkwearmouth 7th Northumbrian Monkwearmouth
Evorhilda unknown West Saxon Poppleton
Felix of Dommoc 7th Frankish Ramsey
Firmin of North Crawley unknown Roman? North Crawley / Thorney Compare Fermin, martyr and bishop of Amiens
Florentius of Peterborough unknown Roman Peterborough According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle MS E, his relics were transferred from Bonneval Abbey to Peterborough in 1013; he is perhaps Florentius of Sedun, martyred by the Vandals[27]
Freomund of Mercia 9th Mercian Dunstable
Frithestan of Winchester 10th West Saxon Winchester Old Minster
Frithuric of Breedon 7th Mercian Breedon-on-the-Hill
Frithuswith of Oxford 8th Mercian Oxford
Frithuwold of Chertsey 7th Mercian Chertsey
Fursey of Cnobheresburg 7th Gaelic / East Anglian Péronne
Grimbald of St Bertin 10th Frankish Winchester New Minster
Guthlac of Crowland 8th East Anglian Crowland
Hadrian of Canterbury 8th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's Born in the Roman exarchate of Africa, conquered by the Arabs in Hadrian's lifetime [28]
Hædde of Winchester 8th West Saxon Winchester Old Minster
Hæmma of Leominster 7th Mercian Leominster
Hereberht of Huntingdon unknown obscure unknown
Herefrith of Thorney unknown East Anglian Thorney May have been a bishop of Lindsey [28]
Hilda of Whitby 7th Northumbrian Whitby / Glastonbury
Hildeburh 7th Mercia Dee Estuary
Hildelith of Barking 8th East Saxon Barking
Hiurmine of Blythburgh 7th East Anglian Blythburgh / Bury St Edmunds
Honorius of Canterbury 7th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's
Huna of Thorney 7th East Anglian Thorney
Humbert of Stokenham unknown West Saxon Stokenham
Hwita of Whitchurch Canonicorum unknown West Saxon Whitchurch Canonicorum
Hygebald of Lindsey 7th obscure Hibaldstow
Hyglac 8th Northumbrian unknown
Indract of Glastonbury 9th Gaelic / West Saxon Glastonbury
Inicium unknown obscure Thorney Body appears to have been in Bochesuurtha, perhaps either Boxworth or Buckworth, before resting at Thorney [29]
Ivo of Ramsey unknown British Ramsey
Iwig of Wilton 7th Northumbrian Wilton
Jermin 8th East Anglian Bury St. Edmunds Killed at the Battle of Bulcamp, his body was translated from Blythburgh. Also known as Jurmin
John of Beverley 8th Northumbrian Beverley
John the Sage unknown obscure Malmesbury William of Malmesbury believed this saint to be John Scotus Erigena, while historian Michael Lapidge has suggested John the Old Saxon, scholar of Alfred the Great [30]
Judoc of Winchester 7th British Winchester New Minster
Jurmin 7th East Anglian Killed in Battle with Penda Prince of East Anglia, Son of King Anna
Justus of Canterbury 7th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's
Juthwara of Sherborne 6th Dumnonia, sub-Roman British Sherborne
Laurence of Canterbury 7th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's
Leofwynn of Bishopstone 7th South Saxon Bishopstone
Mærwynn of Romsey 10th West Saxon Romsey
Maildub of Malmesbury 7th Gaelic / West Saxon Malmesbury
Margaret of Wessex 11th West Saxon Dunfermline
Mellitus of Canterbury 7th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's
Melorius of Amesbury unknown British Amesbury
Merefin unknown Mercian unknown
Mildburh of Wenlock 8th Mercian Wenlock
Mildgyth 8th Mercian unknown
Mildthryth of Thanet 8th Mercian Minster-in-Thanet / Canterbury St Augustine's
Milred of Worcester 8th Mercian Berkswell
Modwenna of Burton unknown Gaelic / Mercian Burton
Monegunda of Watton 6th Frankish Watton
Nectan of Hartland unknown British Hartland
Neot unknown British St Neots
Nothhelm of Canterbury 8th Kentish Canterbury St Augustine's
Oda of Canterbury 10th Anglo-Norse Canterbury Christ Church
Odwulf of Evesham 9th Frisian Evesham
Osana of Howden 8th? Northumbrian Howden
Osburh of Coventry unknown Mercian Coventry
Osgyth 7th East Saxon Chich / Aylesbury
Osthryth 7th Northumbrian Bardney
Oswald of Northumbria 7th Northumbrian Lindisfarne / Gloucester / various Body rested at Bardney, hands at Bamburgh and head at Lindisfarne in the time of Bede; body was translated to Gloucester in 909; the right-arm was later at Peterborough, with the head at Durham and some other bones at Glastonbury [31]
Oswald of Worcester 10th Anglo-Norse Worcester
Oswine of Northumbria 7th Northumbrian Tynemouth / Durham Despite a brief period at Durham, Oswine rested at Tynemouth Priory; Durham possessed the head [32]
Pandionia of Eltisley unknown obscure Eltisley
Patrick unknown Romano-British Glastonbury (/Armagh) Body was alleged to be buried at Glastonbury in the Anglo-Saxon period, though it was discovered by John de Courcy and translated to Armagh Cathedral in 1185[33]
Paulinus of York 7th Roman Rochester
Pega of Peakirk 8th East Anglian Peakirk
Rayne unknown obscure unknown
Regenhere of Northampton 9th East Anglian Northampton
Ruffinus of Stone 7th Mercia Stone
Rumon of Tavistock unknown British Ruan Lanihorne / Tavistock
Rumwold of Buckingham unknown Mercian Buckingham
Samson of Dol 6th British Milton Abbas
Sæbbi of London 7th East Saxon London Cult uncertain [34]
Sativola of Exeter 6th Dumnonia Sub-Roman British Exeter Venerated throughout the Middle Ages in Devon, she has been linked with the 6th Cornish anchoress Sitofolla, sister of Paul Aurelian [35]
Seaxburh of Ely 8th East Anglian Ely
Sicgred of Ripon 8th Northumbrian Ripon / Peterborough
Sigeburh of Thanet 8th Kentish Minster-in-Thanet
Sigfrith of Monkwearmouth 7th Northumbrian Monkwearmouth
Swithhun of Winchester 9th West Saxon Winchester Old Minster
Tatberht of Ripon 8th Northumbrian Ripon / Peterborough
Tancred of Thorney 9th East Anglian Thorney
Torthred of Thorney 9th East Anglian Thorney
Tova of Thorney 9th East Anglian Thorney
Theodore of Canterbury 7th Roman Canterbury St Augustine's
Tibba of Ryhall 7th Mercian Ryhall / Peterborough
Ultan the Scribe 8th Gaelic / Northumbrian unknown Gaelic scribe-priest known only from the 9th-century work of a monk named Æthelwulf, De Abbatibus [36]
Urith of Chittlehampton unknown British Chittlehampton In Latin, Hyaritha; name probably represents Welsh Iwerydd [36]
Wendreda 7th East Anglian Ely/March, Cambridgeshire
Werburh of Chester 8th Mercian Hanbury / Chester
Wærstan unknown Mercian Great Malvern
Walstan of Bawburgh unknown East Anglian Bawburgh
Wigstan of Repton 9th Mercian Repton / Evesham
Wihtberht 8th Northumbrian Ripon
Wihtburh of Ely 8th East Anglian Ely
Wihtred of Thorney unknown obscure Thorney
Wilfrith of Hexham 8th Northumbrian Ripon / Canterbury Christ Church
Wilfrith II 8th Northumbrian Ripon
Wilgisl of Ripon 7th Northumbrian Ripon / Peterborough
Wilgyth of Cholsey 6th Dumnonia, sub-Roman Britain Cholsey
Wulfgar of Peterborough unknown obscure Peterborough
Wulfhad of Stone 7th obscure Stone
Wulfhild of Barking 11th Mercian Barking
Wulfram of Grantham 8th Frankish Grantham
Wulfric of Holme 10th East Anglian Holme
Wulfsige of Sherborne 11th West Saxon Sherborne
Wulfthryth 11th West Saxon Wilton
Wynthryth of March unknown obscure March / Ely


  • Anglo-Norse, of mixed English and Scandinavian extraction characteristic of northern and central England in the later Anglo-Saxon era
  • British, from the British population native to pre-Germanic England, including Welsh, Cornish, Cumbrian and Celtic Armoricans, as well as saints from regions of England Anglicized very late
  • East Anglian, ethnically English and either from or strong associated with the East Anglian region of early medieval England, modern Norfolk, Suffolk as well as some of Cambridgeshire or Lincolnshire
  • East Saxon, ethnically English and either from or strong associated with the East Saxon region of early medieval England
  • Frankish, from the Frankish kingdom in Gaul, including native Latin-speakers but excluding Bretons
  • Frisian, from the Frisian region of early medieval Europe
  • Gaelic, in origin a Gaelic-speaking Celt from Ireland or northern Britain
  • Kentish, ethnically English and either from or strong associated with the Kentish region of early medieval England
  • Mercian, ethnically English and either from or strong associated with the Mercian region of early medieval England
  • Northumbrian, ethnically English and either from or strong associated with the Northumbrian region of early medieval England
  • Roman, from the Roman (or 'Byzantine') Empire, excluding Britain
  • Romano-British, from Roman Britain and neither clearly British or clearly Latin
  • South Saxon, ethnically English and either from or strongly associated with the South Saxon region of early medieval England
  • West Saxon, ethnically English and either from or strongly associated with the West Saxon region of early medieval England

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ D. W. Rollason, "Lists of saints' resting-places in Anglo-Saxon England" in ASE 7 (1978), p. 62
  2. ^ a b c Blair, "Handlist", p. 502
  3. ^ a b c Blair, "Handlist", p. 503
  4. ^ a b Blair, "Handlist", p. 504
  5. ^ a b c Blair, "Handlist", p. 506
  6. ^ Farmer, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, s.v. "Alburga", p. 13
  7. ^ Yorke, Nunneries, p. 76
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Blair, "Handlist", p. 563
  9. ^ Farmer, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, s.v. "Ethelnoth", p. 166
  10. ^ a b Blair, "Handlist", p. 507
  11. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 508
  12. ^ Farmer, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, s.v. "Elwin", p. 157
  13. ^ Blair, "Handlist", pp. 508–09
  14. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 510
  15. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 511
  16. ^ Farmer, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, s.v. "Amphibalus", p. 20
  17. ^ a b Blair, "Handlist", p. 515
  18. ^ Known only from the Hagiography of the Secgan Manuscript. Stowe MS 944, British Library.
  19. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 516
  20. ^ Pfaff, "The Calendar", p. 66
  21. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 520
  22. ^ Woolf, Pictland to Alba, pp. 79–86
  23. ^ Farmer, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, s.v. "Drithelm", p. 136
  24. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 525
  25. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 527
  26. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 528
  27. ^ Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, p. 144, n. 8
  28. ^ a b Blair, "Handlist", p. 537
  29. ^ Blair, "Handlist", pp. 540–41
  30. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 542
  31. ^ Blair, "Handlist", pp. 549–50; Craig, "Oswald"
  32. ^ Blair, "Handlist", pp. 550–51
  33. ^ Stancliffe, "Patrick"
  34. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 564
  35. ^ Blair, "Handlist", p. 554
  36. ^ a b Blair, "Handlist", p. 557

References[edit]

  • Blair, John (2002), "A Handlist of Anglo-Saxon Saints", in Thacker, Alan; Sharpe, Richard, Local Saints and Local Churches in the Early Medieval West, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 495–565, ISBN 0-19-820394-2 
  • Craig, D. J. (2004), "Oswald [St Oswald] (603/4–642), king of Northumbria", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, retrieved 2011-02-06 
  • Farmer, David Hugh (1992), The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (New ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-283069-4 
  • F. Liebermann, Die Heiligen Englands, Hanover, 1889.
  • Pfaff, Richard W. (1992), "The Calendar", in Gibson, Margaret T.; Heslop, T. A.; Pfaff, William, The Eadwine Psalter: Text, Image, and Monastic Culture in Twelfth-Century Canterbury, London: The Modern Humanities Research Association (in conjunction with The Pennsylvania State University Press), pp. 62–87, ISBN 0-947623-46-9 
  • Susan J. Ridyard, The Royal Saints of Anglo-Saxon England: A Study of West Saxon and East Anglican Cults, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series, 1988.
  • D. W. Rollason, "Lists of saints' resting-places in Anglo-Saxon England" in ASE 7 (1978), 61-93.
  • Stancliffe, Clare (2004), "Patrick (fl. 5th cent.), patron saint of Ireland", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, retrieved 2011-02-07 
  • Swanton, Michael, ed. (2000), The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (New ed.), London: Phoenix Press, ISBN 1-84212-003-4 
  • Woolf, Alex (2007), From Pictland to Alba, 789–1070, The New Edinburgh History of Scotland, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, ISBN 978-0-7486-1234-5 
  • Yorke, Barbara (2003), Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses, London: Continuum, ISBN 0-8264-6040-2