Max Biaggi

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Max Biaggi
Biaggi.JPG
Max Biaggi in 2007
Nationality Italian
Bike number 3
Website max-biaggi.com
Motorcycle racing career statistics
MotoGP World Championship
Active years 19982005
Manufacturers Honda (1998, 20032005)
Yamaha (19992002)
Championships 0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
127 13 58 23 14 1624
250cc World Championship
Active years 19911997
Manufacturers Aprilia (19911992, 19941996)
Honda (1993, 1997)
Championships 4 (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
87 29 53 33 28 1268
Superbike World Championship
Active years 20072012
Manufacturers Suzuki (2007)
Ducati (2008)
Aprilia (20092012)
Championships 2 (2010, 2012)
2012 Championship position 1st (358 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
155 21 70 8 15 2066

Massimiliano "Max" Biaggi (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmaks ˈbjaddʒi]; born 26 June 1971 in Rome, Italy)[1][2] is a former Grand Prix motorcycle road racing World Champion and winner of the 2010 and 2012 World Superbike Championship. Throughout his racing career, he has won the 250cc World Championship four consecutive times, and finished as runner-up in both the 500cc and MotoGP championships. In 2007 he switched to the World Superbike Championship, finishing third overall as a rookie and earned his first Superbike World Championship in 2010 becoming only the 2nd European from outside of the United Kingdom after Raymond Roche to do so.[3] Biaggi announced his retirement from racing on 7 November 2012.

He has been nicknamed 'il Corsaro' ('the Corsair') and 'the Roman Emperor'.

Career[edit]

125cc[edit]

Biaggi was more interested in football as a child. But in 1989, after he was given a motorcycle for his seventeenth birthday, he began his racing career in the 125cc class at age eighteen. In 1990 he won the Italian Sport Production Championship. Following his success in 125cc, Biaggi moved up to the 250cc class.

250cc[edit]

In 1991, Biaggi finished second behind British rider Woolsey Coulter in the European 250cc championship on an Aprilia RS250, and that same year he finished twenty-seventh in the Grand Prix motorcycle 250cc world championship riding for the same manufacturer. In 1992, Biaggi completed his first entire season in 250cc Grand Prix for Aprilia, and finished the season fifth overall. In that same season he took his first victory in Kyalami, South Africa. The following season, Biaggi joined Honda, and finished fourth in the championship standings, including a single victory in Barcelona. In 1994 he returned to Aprilia and dominated the 250cc Grand Prix class by winning three consecutive world championships in 1994, 1995 and 1996. In 1997, Biaggi again returned to Honda, riding for Erv Kanemoto's team, and won his fourth consecutive title. Following that, he moved up to the 500cc class.

500cc[edit]

Biaggi made an impressive start in his 500cc debut, qualifying on pole, setting the fastest lap and winning his first race in the 1998 Japanese motorcycle Grand Prix at Suzuka, riding for the Kanemoto Honda team. He was also victorious at the Czech Republic Grand Prix and finished the season in second place behind Mick Doohan. Biaggi then joined Yamaha to battle against the dominant Hondas. He finished fourth in 1999, third in 2000, and second in 2001.

MotoGP[edit]

Max Biaggi with Repsol Honda in 2005

In 2002, Biaggi rode the four-stroke for the first time as development on the new motorcycle remained strong throughout the season. He won in Brno, Czech Republic and Sepang, Malaysia to clinch runner-up in the championship behind rival Valentino Rossi. In 2003, Biaggi finished third in the MotoGP championship after rejoining Honda on the Camel Pramac Pons team. It was expected that Biaggi would be one of the main candidates for the title in 2004, but a crash in Estoril saw his season begin to fade. At the end of the 2004 MotoGP season Biaggi finished the championship in third place, behind Sete Gibernau and series winner, Rossi.

Biaggi started the 2005 MotoGP season as an official factory Honda rider, joining American racer Nicky Hayden on the Repsol Honda Team with technical director Erv Kanemoto. It was hoped that continued cooperation with Kanemoto and the full factory support from Honda would make Biaggi one of the main title contenders in 2005. However, Biaggi finished the season in only fifth place.

Biaggi lost his ride for the 2006 season, his position filled by 2005 250cc Grand Prix champion, Dani Pedrosa. He negotiated with Honda, Kawasaki, and Suzuki, however, was unable to land a contract even with the backing of major tobacco sponsor Camel who ended up signing up to be the factory Yamaha squad's title sponsor for 2006. On January 10, 2006, Biaggi posted on his website that he would not take part in the 2006 MotoGP season.

Superbike World Championship[edit]

Max Biaggi at WK SBK Assen 2007

Biaggi attempted to reach an agreement to race the Superbike World Championship for Corona Alstare Suzuki in 2006, but the team could not commit to equal equipment with their existing riders, 2005 champion Troy Corser and Yukio Kagayama. As a result, he took a sabbatical, but on 14 September 2006 Biaggi announced he had signed to replace Corser in the team for 2007.

Biaggi began the season by winning the first race at the Losail International Circuit in Qatar and finishing second in race two. In doing so Max Biaggi became one of only five men to win their first Superbike World Championship race, and the only rider ever to win his first Superbike race and his first race in 500cc Grand Prix. He then finished 3rd and 4th at Phillip Island, Australia.

After a hard championship Max Biaggi finished third, behind World Champion James Toseland and Yamaha top rider Noriyuki Haga.

At the end of the season, Francis Batta, Alstare Suzuki Racing Team director, was forced to release Biaggi, due to the loss of the main sponsor Corona Extra, as they could not reach financial agreement. Furthermore, Suzuki decided to stop official Superbike development for 2008, instead focusing on the MotoGP championship. For 2008 Biaggi replaced team manager Marco Borciani as a rider at his Team Sterilgarda/Go Eleven, riding a satelitte-works Ducati 1098RS alongside Ruben Xaus.[4] He finished seventh overall with seven podiums, three places ahead of Xaus and one ahead of factory Ducati rider Michel Fabrizio.

For 2009 he joined the returning factory Aprilia team. He took a double podium in round 2 at Qatar, and scored solid points before taking their first win since the return at Brno, after race leaders Fabrizio and Ben Spies collided. He finished a close second behind Spies in race two there, and finished the season 4th overall.

Biaggi riding the RSV4 in 2011

Biaggi continued with Aprilia for 2010, taking a double victory at the team's home race at Monza to move up to second in the standings. Another double in the USA gave him first place in the championship, after previous leader Leon Haslam failed to finish in race 2.[5]

In August 2010, Biaggi signed a renewed, two year contract with Aprilia to remain with the team in World Superbikes until 2012.[6]

In 2010, Biaggi became Aprilia's and Italy's first Superbike World Champion.[3]

2011 was a year of mixed results for Biaggi and Aprilia. He only managed 2 wins at Aragon, Spain and Brno, Czech Republic. Even though he was in contention for the title due to multiple second place finishes, Biaggi fractured his left foot in Germany which caused him to miss 2 rounds: Imola and Magny Cours.[7] Biaggi ended the 2011 season in third place (303 points) and tied in points with Eugene Laverty.[8]

Personal life[edit]

Biaggi is known as the Roman Emperor and Mad Max and is notorious for his difficult relationships with the press, team personnel and other riders.[9][10][11][12]

He is currently engaged to Miss Italia 2002 winner and TV personality Eleonora Pedron; together they have a daughter Inés Angelica Biaggi and one son Leon Alexandre Biaggi.[13]

Career statistics[edit]

Grand Prix motorcycle racing[edit]

By season[edit]

All stats according to MotoGP.com[14]

Season Class Motorcycle Team Race Win Podium Pole FLap Pts Plcd
1991 250cc Aprilia RSV250 4 0 0 0 0 7 27th
1992 250cc Aprilia RSV250 Telkor Valesi Racing 12 1 5 4 1 78 5th
1993 250cc Honda NSR250 Rothmans Kanemoto 14 1 5 2 1 142 4th
1994 250cc Aprilia RSV250 Chesterfield Aprilia 14 5 10 7 8 234 1st
1995 250cc Aprilia RSV250 Chesterfield Aprilia 13 8 12 9 7 283 1st
1996 250cc Aprilia RSV250 Chesterfield Aprilia 15 9 11 8 9 274 1st
1997 250cc Honda NSR250 Marlboro Kanemoto 15 5 10 3 2 250 1st
1998 500cc Honda NSR500 Marlboro Kanemoto 14 2 8 2 2 208 2nd
1999 500cc Yamaha YZR500 Marlboro Yamaha 16 1 7 1 1 194 4th
2000 500cc Yamaha YZR500 Marlboro Yamaha 16 2 4 5 3 170 3rd
2001 500cc Yamaha YZR500 Marlboro Yamaha 16 3 9 7 2 219 2nd
2002 MotoGP Yamaha YZR-M1 Marlboro Yamaha 16 2 8 4 1 215 2nd
2003 MotoGP Honda RC211V Camel Pramac Pons 16 2 9 3 1 228 3rd
2004 MotoGP Honda RC211V Camel Honda 16 1 9 1 3 217 3rd
2005 MotoGP Honda RC211V Repsol Honda 17 0 4 0 1 173 5th
Total 214 42 111 56 42 2892

Races by year[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position)

Year Class Bike 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Pos Pts
1991 250cc Aprilia JPN
AUS
USA
SPA
ITA
GER
AUT
EUR
Ret
NED
FRA
13
GBR
Ret
RSM
12
CZE
VDM
MAL
27th 7
1992 250cc Aprilia JPN
Ret
AUS
8
MAL
Ret
SPA
10
ITA
3
EUR
3
GER
2
NED
Ret
HUN
Ret
FRA
DNS
GBR
Ret
BRA
2
RSA
1
5th 78
1993 250cc Honda AUS
3
MAL
17
JPN
Ret
SPA
2
AUT
5
GER
4
NED
Ret
EUR
1
RSM
5
GBR
6
CZE
2
ITA
Ret
USA
Ret
FIM
3
4th 142
1994 250cc Aprilia AUS
1
MAL
1
JPN
4
SPA
Ret
AUT
2
GER
2
NED
1
ITA
Ret
FRA
3
GBR
Ret
CZE
1
USA
2
ARG
2
EUR
1
1st 234
1995 250cc Aprilia AUS
3
MAL
1
JPN
9
SPA
2
GER
1
ITA
1
NED
1
FRA
2
GBR
1
CZE
1
BRA
2
ARG
1
EUR
1
1st 283
1996 250cc Aprilia MAL
1
INA
2
JPN
1
SPA
1
ITA
1
FRA
1
NED
3
GER
4
GBR
1
AUT
Ret
CZE
1
IMO
Ret
CAT
1
BRA
Ret
AUS
1
1st 274
1997 250cc Honda MAL
1
JPN
7
SPA
3
ITA
1
AUT
3
FRA
2
NED
DSQ
IMO
1
GER
4
BRA
5
GBR
Ret
CZE
1
CAT
2
INA
1
AUS
2
1st 250
1998 500cc Honda JPN
1
MAL
3
SPA
3
ITA
2
FRA
5
MAD
6
NED
2
GBR
6
GER
2
CZE
1
IMO
3
CAT
DSQ
AUS
8
ARG
5
2nd 208
1999 500cc Yamaha MAL
Ret
JPN
9
SPA
2
FRA
Ret
ITA
2
CAT
Ret
NED
5
GBR
4
GER
Ret
CZE
4
IMO
3
VAL
7
AUS
2
RSA
1
BRA
2
ARG
2
4th 194
2000 500cc Yamaha RSA
Ret
MAL
4
JPN
Ret
SPA
Ret
FRA
Ret
ITA
9
CAT
5
NED
4
GBR
9
GER
4
CZE
1
POR
4
VAL
3
BRA
5
PAC
3
AUS
1
3rd 170
2001 500cc Yamaha JPN
3
RSA
8
SPA
11
FRA
1
ITA
3
CAT
2
NED
1
GBR
2
GER
1
CZE
10
POR
5
VAL
10
PAC
Ret
AUS
2
MAL
Ret
BRA
3
2nd 219
2002 MotoGP Yamaha JPN
Ret
RSA
9
SPA
DSQ
FRA
3
ITA
2
CAT
4
NED
4
GBR
2
GER
2
CZE
1
POR
6
BRA
2
PAC
Ret
MAL
1
AUS
6
VAL
3
2nd 215
2003 MotoGP Honda JPN
2
RSA
3
SPA
2
FRA
5
ITA
3
CAT
14
NED
2
GBR
1
GER
Ret
CZE
5
POR
2
BRA
4
PAC
1
MAL
3
AUS
17
VAL
4
3rd 228
2004 MotoGP Honda RSA
2
SPA
2
FRA
3
ITA
3
CAT
8
NED
4
BRA
2
GER
1
GBR
12
CZE
3
POR
Ret
JPN
Ret
QAT
6
MAL
2
AUS
7
VAL
2
3rd 217
2005 MotoGP Honda SPA
7
POR
3
CHN
5
FRA
5
ITA
2
CAT
6
NED
6
USA
4
GBR
Ret
GER
4
CZE
3
JPN
2
MAL
6
QAT
Ret
AUS
Ret
TUR
12
VAL
6
5th 173


World Superbike Championship[edit]

By season[edit]

Season Class Motorcycle Team Race Win Podium Pole FLap Pts Plcd
2007 SBK Suzuki GSX-R1000 Alstare Suzuki 25 3 17 0 5 397 3rd
2008 SBK Ducati 1098 RS Sterilgarda Go Eleven 28 0 7 0 1 238 7th
2009 SBK Aprilia RSV4 Aprilia Racing 28 1 9 0 1 319 4th
2010 SBK Aprilia RSV4 Aprilia Alitalia Racing 26 10 14 2 2 451 1st
2011 SBK Aprilia RSV4 Aprilia Alitalia Racing 21 2 12 2 5 303 3rd
2012 SBK Aprilia RSV4 Aprilia Racing 27 5 11 1 5 358 1st
Total 155 21 70 5 19 2066

Races by year[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Pos Pts Ref
R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2
2007 Suzuki QAT
1
QAT
2
AUS
3
AUS
4
EUR
3
EUR
2
SPA
8
SPA
2
NED
6
NED
3
ITA
3
ITA
5
GBR
6
GBR
C
SMR
Ret
SMR
3
CZE
2
CZE
1
GBR
3
GBR
8
GER
2
GER
3
ITA
1
ITA
2
FRA
6
FRA
2
3rd 397
2008 Ducati QAT
2
QAT
3
AUS
Ret
AUS
Ret
SPA
16
SPA
8
NED
10
NED
12
ITA
5
ITA
Ret
USA
9
USA
4
GER
13
GER
7
SMR
Ret
SMR
2
CZE
4
CZE
3
GBR
3
GBR
12
EUR
3
EUR
6
ITA
2
ITA
Ret
FRA
4
FRA
6
POR
Ret
POR
13
7th 238 [15]
2009 Aprilia AUS
11
AUS
15
QAT
3
QAT
3
SPA
8
SPA
8
NED
5
NED
Ret
ITA
11
ITA
5
RSA
5
RSA
5
USA
6
USA
4
SMR
13
SMR
10
GBR
2
GBR
21
CZE
1
CZE
2
GER
5
GER
4
ITA
2
ITA
4
FRA
3
FRA
2
POR
3
POR
6
4th 319 [16]
2010 Aprilia AUS
5
AUS
8
POR
1
POR
1
SPA
2
SPA
3
NED
6
NED
4
ITA
1
ITA
1
RSA
4
RSA
3
USA
1
USA
1
SMR
1
SMR
1
CZE
2
CZE
1
GBR
5
GBR
6
GER
4
GER
5
ITA
11
ITA
5
FRA
4
FRA
1
1st 451 [17]
2011 Aprilia AUS
2
AUS
2
EUR
7
EUR
DSQ
NED
2
NED
2
ITA
2
ITA
8
USA
Ret
USA
3
SMR
2
SMR
2
SPA
2
SPA
1
CZE
2
CZE
1
GBR
11
GBR
4
GER
DNS
GER
DNS
ITA ITA FRA FRA POR
4
POR
7
3rd 303
2012 Aprilia AUS
1
AUS
2
ITA
4
ITA
4
NED
4
NED
8
ITA
C
ITA
5
EUR
5
EUR
2
USA
3
USA
3
SMR
1
SMR
1
SPA
1
SPA
4
CZE
6
CZE
4
GBR
Ret
GBR
11
RUS
3
RUS
Ret
GER
1
GER
13
POR
4
POR
3
FRA
Ret
FRA
5
1st 358

References[edit]

  1. ^ Max Biaggi at the Internet Movie Database
  2. ^ "Max Biaggi Biography", Motorbike Sport, 5 January 2009, retrieved 2010-06-25 
  3. ^ a b http://www.worldsbk.com/en/news/latest-news/4444-max-the-first-italian-wsbk-champ.html
  4. ^ "Biaggi Signs With Sterilgarda Ducati WSBK!". SuperbikePlanet.com. Retrieved 2007-10-30. 
  5. ^ Biaggi savours ‘perfect result’ on home soil
  6. ^ "Biaggi signs with Aprilia until 2012". Insidebikes. Retrieved 2010-08-03. 
  7. ^ "Max Biaggi 2011-2012 Racing Results". GrandPrixRankings.com. Retrieved 2012-06-13. 
  8. ^ "2011 WorldSBK World Championship Standings". GrandPrixRankings.com. Retrieved 2012-06-13. 
  9. ^ "Max Biaggi Bio", MotorcycleUSA, January 21, 2008, retrieved 2010-06-25 
  10. ^ Macauley, Ted (26 June 2001), "Motorcycling: Italian pair take rivalry to the Max", Daily Mirror (London): 3, retrieved 2010-06-25 
  11. ^ Alonso, Ivan (31 October 20012004-10-31), "Rossi takes ninth victory of the season in Valencia", Motorsport.com, retrieved 2010-06-25 
  12. ^ Every, Rob (25 February 2007), "WSBK: Roman Emperor Max Biaggi has landed!", Motorcycle Racing Online, retrieved 2010-06-25 
  13. ^ http://www.worldsbk.com/en/news/latest-news/4836-congratulations-to-max-biaggi.html
  14. ^ "Max Biaggi". MotoGP.com. Retrieved 2008-11-11. 
  15. ^ "Portimao; 31 October, 1–2 November 2008: Superbike – Championship Standings". Superbike World Championship. Infront Motor Sports. 2008-11-02. Retrieved 2010-07-07. 
  16. ^ "2009 Standings Riders – FIM Superbike World Championship". Superbike World Championship. Infront Motor Sports. Retrieved 2010-07-07. 
  17. ^ "2010 Standings Riders – FIM Superbike World Championship". Superbike World Championship. Infront Motor Sports. Retrieved 2010-07-07. 

External links[edit]


Sporting positions
Preceded by
Leon van der Heijen
250 cc motorcycle European Champion
1991
Succeeded by
Luis Carlos Maurel
Preceded by
Tetsuya Harada
250cc Motorcycle World Champion
1994–1997
Succeeded by
Loris Capirossi
Preceded by
Ben Spies
World Superbike Champion
2010
Succeeded by
Carlos Checa
Preceded by
Carlos Checa
World Superbike Champion
2012
Succeeded by
Tom Sykes