Casey Stoner

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Not to be confused with Casey Stoney.
Casey Stoner, AM
Casey Stoner - 2011 MotoGP World Champion.jpg
Nationality  Australian
Born (1985-10-16) 16 October 1985 (age 29)
Southport, Queensland, Australia
Website caseystoner.com.au
Motorcycle racing career statistics
MotoGP World Championship
Active years 20062012
Manufacturers Honda (2006, 2011–2012), Ducati (2007–2010)
Championships 2 (2007, 2011)
2012 Championship position 3rd (254 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
115 38 69 39 29 1815
250cc World Championship
Active years 2002, 2005
Manufacturers Aprilia
Championships 0
2005 Championship position 2nd (254 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
31 5 10 2 1 322
125cc World Championship
Active years 2001, 20032004
Manufacturers Honda, Aprilia, KTM
Championships 0
2004 Championship position 5th (145 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
30 2 10 2 3 274

Casey Joel Stoner, AM, (born 16 October 1985 in Southport, Queensland, Australia) is a retired Australian professional motorcycle racer, and a two-time MotoGP World Champion, in 2007 and 2011. Many commentators, pundits, as well as former and current riders including Ben Spies, Andrea Dovizioso and Nicky Hayden, consider Casey Stoner to be the fastest and most talented rider to have ever raced a motorcycle.[1][2][3]

Born in Southport, Queensland, Australia, Stoner raced from a young age and moved to the United Kingdom to pursue a racing career. After first competing internationally in 2002, Stoner became MotoGP World Champion in 2007 for Ducati Corse. One of Stoner's greatest talents was his ability to ride any motorcycle beyond its limits, even producing race wins on the inferior Ducati after both Honda and Yamaha had forged ahead in development during recent years.[4] Stoner is the only man to have ever won a MotoGP World Championship by riding a Ducati and the win in 2007 remains as Ducati's only championship.[5]

After his departure from Ducati to Honda following the 2010 season, Stoner won a second world championship title in 2011 for Repsol Honda. Prior to the 2012 French Grand Prix, Stoner announced that he would retire from Grand Prix racing at the conclusion of the 2012 season.[6][7]

Career[edit]

Early years[edit]

He competed in his first race was when he was four years old, in an under-nine years old race at the Mike Hatcher's dirt racing track on the Gold Coast of Australia. Between his very first race win at the age of six and the age of fourteen, Stoner won 41 dirt and long track titles and 70 state titles.[8]

One feat he achieved that illustrates his passion and "need" for racing was at age twelve. Over one weekend he raced in 5 different categories in all 7 rounds of each capacity; a weekend consisting of 35 different races. Not only did he compete in all these categories and different engine capacities, the young Stoner went on to win 32 out of the 35 races. There were five Australian titles to be won that weekend, Stoner won all five.

At the age of 14 years, Stoner and his parents agreed he was ready to move up onto road racing so they packed up and moved to England – where the legal age for road racing is 14.[8]

From 2000 to 2002, he contested the national 125cc GP championships in Britain and Spain, winning the English 125cc Aprilia Championship in 2000, before moving full-time to the 250cc GP World Championships in 2002. His season on an Aprilia under the guidance of Lucio Cecchinello was turbulent, with no podium places from 15 race starts.

125cc[edit]

In 2003 Stoner moved to the 125cc GP category. Here, working again with Cecchinello and Aprilia, he met with considerable success, scoring his first GP race win and three second places, finishing 8th overall at the season's end.

In 2004 Stoner joined the Red Bull KTM factory team in 125cc class and continued to improve, with another race win, two second places, three thirds, and a final championship position of fifth.

250cc[edit]

In 2005 he rejoined the 250cc world championship class, racing once again for Lucio Cecchinello' team on a works Aprilia, Stoner emerged toward the season's end as a serious threat to championship leader Dani Pedrosa; a threat that only dissipated with a crash at Stoner's home Grand Prix of Phillip Island, allowing Pedrosa to establish an insurmountable points lead. Stoner went on to claim a solid second place in the overall championship standings, with an impressive five race victories for the season.

MotoGP[edit]

2006[edit]

Stoner during the MotoGP pre-season test session at Sepang International Circuit in Malaysia in January 2007.

In October 2005, Stoner, along with Lucio Cecchinello's team, reportedly had an agreement to move to the MotoGP class in the upcoming season with support from Yamaha.[9][10][11] After the season ended, he received an offer from the Honda Pons team and tested the Honda RC211V bike with them at Valencia.[12] However, in December 2005, Stoner re-signed with Cecchinello's team after Honda Pons failed to secure sponsorship for the upcoming season.[13] The team then made an agreement with HRC to run the RC211V for Stoner in 2006.[14]

He took pole in just his second MotoGP race, but crashed several times during the season. He finished in 8th position in the championship, with his best result being a 2nd place at the Turkish Grand Prix, where he was leading until overtaken on the final corner by Marco Melandri.

2007[edit]

Stoner secured a ride with the factory Ducati team for the 2007 season,[15] joining Loris Capirossi on the new 800cc Ducati Desmosedici GP7. 6 poles and 10 race wins (including three of the first four[16]), took him to his first GP title, by a margin of 125 points (equivalent to five victories) over Dani Pedrosa, which he built during the second half of the season.[17] His worst finish was a 6th place at Motegi, which was all he needed to clinch the title that day, taking the first premier class title for an Italian manufacturer since Phil Read's title for MV Agusta in 1974.[18] Stoner was named Young Australian of the Year for his 2007 performance.[19]

2008[edit]

Stoner opened the 2008 season with a victory at Qatar, before a run of two races without a podium. He returned to the podium with a second place at Mugello, before starting a run of seven successive pole positions.[20] He turned three of them into successive victories – a lights-to-flag win at Donington,[21] leading every lap at Assen six days later,[22] and recovering from a huge Friday crash at Sachsenring[23] to win in the wet after Dani Pedrosa crashed,[24] moving to within 20 points of the championship lead. However, successive crashes while fighting for the lead at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca (where he remounted to finish second to Valentino Rossi),[25] Brno and Misano ensured that he could not defend the title successfully.[26][27] Stoner finished the 2008 season as runner-up to Rossi with 280 points, the highest amount of points ever gained without taking the title at the time.[28]

2009[edit]

Stoner's bike in Brno

Stoner remained with Ducati for the 2009 season with new team mate Nicky Hayden, with a further option for a 4th season in 2010.[29] A strong start to the season left Stoner in a three way battle with the Fiat Yamaha duo of Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo, before he was struck by a mystery illness which caused him to feel tired long before the end of races, leaving him 16 points behind Rossi and 7 behind Lorenzo after the US Grand Prix at Laguna Seca on 5 July.

Stoner was subsequently diagnosed with anemia and an inflammation of the stomach lining.[30] Stoner later disputed the diagnosis however and, after continuing to struggle with the condition, he announced on 10 August 2009 that he would miss rounds 11, 12 and 13 in Brno, Indianapolis and Misano respectively in an attempt to recover from the illness, subsequently diagnosed as lactose intolerance.[31] Mika Kallio was chosen as Stoner's replacement for the three races.[32] Stoner returned to racing late in the 2009 season, placing second in the Portuguese Grand Prix and an emphatic first in the Australian Grand Prix, which he led throughout. At interview following the Australian Grand Prix, Stoner said that he experienced none of the premature tiredness that had dogged him earlier in the 2009 season. He followed this up with another first place in the wet at the Malaysian Grand Prix. At the last round of 2009 at Valencia, Stoner dominated all practice and qualifying sessions to take pole, only to crash on cold tyres on the warm-up lap and miss the race.[33] Stoner ended the season with four victories, and eight podiums in total, leading to a fourth place finish in the riders' championship.

2010[edit]

At the test held immediately following the Valencia round, Stoner was once again fastest while testing the new 2010 version of the Desmosedici. However, Rossi was fastest in five of the six pre-season tests. Stoner qualified on pole for the season opener in Qatar, and was leading the race when he crashed out, later acknowledging that this was his own mistake.[34] He also crashed out of round 3 at Le Mans, this time attributing the crash to the front of the bike unloading when not running at maximum pace.[35] His first podium of the year came at Assen, despite struggling with arm pump late in the race.[36]

It was not until the thirteenth race of the season, the inaugural Aragon Grand Prix, that Stoner achieved his first victory.[37] His victory in Aragon started a run of three victories in four races, as he also won the delayed Japanese Grand Prix,[38] and won for the fourth consecutive year at Phillip Island.[39] He eventually finished fourth in the riders' championship once again. With Rossi having fallen out of favour with Yamaha following Lorenzo's championship-winning season and Honda no longer willing to play second-fiddle to another Japanese manufacturer, an intense game of musical-chairs ensued in the MotoGP paddock that saw several of the top riders switch teams, Stoner among them. For 2011, Stoner joined Honda Racing Corporation after four years at Ducati Corse,[40] where he was replaced by Valentino Rossi.

2011[edit]

Stoner at the 2011 Czech Grand Prix

Stoner raced with the Repsol Honda Racing Team in 2011, with team mates Dani Pedrosa and Andrea Dovizioso. In preseason testing in Malaysia, Stoner was quickest in all three sessions,[41] closely followed by Pedrosa and reigning world champion Jorge Lorenzo. Stoner won the season-opening race in Qatar from pole position,[42] and had been quickest in each of the free practice sessions held before qualifying. Stoner took pole position for the Spanish Grand Prix, but had been running second behind Marco Simoncelli when he was taken out by the Ducati of Valentino Rossi in wet conditions.[43][44] Stoner won three out of the first five rounds of the season, with victories in Le Mans and Catalunya to add to his Qatar victory. Stoner added victories at Silverstone in damp conditions, and Laguna Seca, to hold a 20-point lead over Jorge Lorenzo with eight races to go in the season.

Stoner proposed boycotting the Japanese Grand Prix out of fears for his health from radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant[citation needed] even though all the independent scientific experts including the World Health Organization and Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency stated that it is safe to live permanently 80 km (50 mi) or more from the plant.[45]

Stoner won the World Championship for the second time at his home round at Phillip Island, Australia.[46] On his 26th birthday, Stoner won his ninth race of the season from his eleventh pole, and with his only challenger Jorge Lorenzo ruled out of the race due to a hand injury suffered in warm-up, Stoner finished the weekend with an unassailable 65-point lead. His victory in the Australian MotoGP was his fifth in succession in his home race dating back to 2007 making him the only rider to have won at Phillip Island during the 800cc era of MotoGP.

2012[edit]

Stoner started the season with wins at Jerez,[47] and Estoril,[48] both tracks he had not won a MotoGP race at before; his victory in Estoril allowed him to take the championship lead. By finishing fourth at the Catalan Grand Prix, Stoner finished off the podium for the first time in fourteen months.[49] He won the Dutch TT at Assen to move back level on points with Lorenzo, who was taken-out by Álvaro Bautista on the first lap.[50] This put Stoner even in points with Lorenzo before a final-lap retirement at the Sachsenring, while battling team-mate Dani Pedrosa.[51] Stoner finished only eighth at the Italian Grand Prix after running off-circuit, later describing that he was "not comfortable" on the bike,[52] but followed that up with a fourth win of the season at Laguna Seca.[53] Stoner crashed heavily during qualifying for the Indianapolis Grand Prix, suffering torn ligaments in his ankle but was declared fit to race the following day.[54] He finished fourth in the race, 2.5 seconds behind third-placed Andrea Dovizioso.[55] Stoner then elected to have surgery on his ankle, ruling him out of action for three races,[56][57] returning at the Japanese Grand Prix in October.[58] He finished fifth and third in his first two races after his return, before winning his home race for the sixth successive season at Phillip Island giving him an undefeated record on Bridgestone tyres at the circuit.[59]

Retirement[edit]

On 17 May 2012, during the pre-event press conference at the French Grand Prix, Stoner announced that he would retire from MotoGP at the end of the 2012 season.[6][7] Stoner stated that he no longer enjoyed competing in the series, which was one of the contributing factors to his retirement.[60] Getting away from the political stress of MotoGP, as well as having a desire to spend more time leisurely with his family were further reasons for his retirement. As of June 2014 Stoner is enjoying his life away from the sport with his family and has no regrets about his retirement, further dismissing any chances of a comeback.[61]

Status and personality[edit]

The podium after the 2010 Australian Grand Prix, with Stoner flanked by Jorge Lorenzo and Valentino Rossi.

Stoner has showed signs of feeling underappreciated by the general public. He was angered by consistent suggestions that the bike and tyres had a bigger role in his success than he did,[62] and unhappy at being booed at Donington in both 2007 and 2008.[63]

In August 2008 he was criticised for his team's association with tobacco company Philip Morris.[64]

Stoner has stated that he would prefer to shun the limelight and would prefer to let his riding style do the talking. In a recent interview with Australian Motorcycle News, he was quoted as saying that he would prefer a return to purer form of racing from the 500cc days, stating that "Back in those days, it was just racing – Doohan, Rainey, Schwantz, Gardner, Lawson – not half as much bullshit as now. That was the life."

Before the 2012 Australian Grand Prix, the Phillip Island Grand Prix Circuit named the third corner "Stoner Corner".

V8 Supercars[edit]

2013[edit]

After announcing his retirement from MotoGP, rumours persisted throughout the year that Stoner would debut in touring car racing in 2013; specifically the Australian V8 Supercars series. Such a switch is a rare but not unprecedented move; as fellow Australian world motorcycling champion Wayne Gardner retired from motorcycle racing in 1992 and made his touring car debut the following year. The rumours intensified when V8 Supercars team Triple Eight Race Engineering announced that Red Bull; a long term sponsor of Stoner, would be the major sponsor of the team from 2013 onwards, replacing Vodafone. After numerous denials, in January 2013, Stoner announced that he would indeed move to touring car racing on a one year contract with Triple Eight Race Engineering. Stoner would race in the second tier Dunlop V8 Supercar Series for the 2013 season.[65]

On 27 February 2013, two days before his debut at the Adelaide Street Circuit, Stoner unveiled his car, sponsored by Red Bull and Pirtek. His car would be a Holden VE Commodore, the same car that was driven to victory in the 2010 Bathurst 1000 by Mark Skaife and Craig Lowndes.[66]

Honours[edit]

Stoner was named the 2008 Young Australian of the Year for his 2007 MotoGP performance.[19] On 10 June 2013, Stoner was appointed a member of the Order of Australia for significant service to motorcycle racing.[67]

The FIM named him a Legend in October 2013 prior to the 2013 Australian motorcycle Grand Prix.[68]

Personal life[edit]

Stoner met Adriana Tuchyna from Adelaide when she approached him at Phillip Island in 2003 and asked him to sign her stomach.[69] A relationship began in 2005 when she turned 16,[70] and they were married in Adelaide on 6 January 2007.[71]

Following his experience of tiredness and sickness during 2009, Stoner was ultimately diagnosed as lactose intolerant.[72]

At the Czech Republic Grand Prix in August 2011, Stoner announced that his wife was pregnant with their first child.[73][74] The baby, named Alessandra Maria, was born on 16 February 2012,[75] the same birthday as Stoner's long-time rival Valentino Rossi.

Career statistics[edit]

Stoner's most successful race was Phillip Island which he dominated with 6 straight wins until his retirement, having never lost at the event on a factory bike. His next best races were Qatar with 4 wins and then Great Britain and Laguna Seca with 3 wins apiece. In addition, Casey Stoner won every different Grand Prix that was available to be won during his racing career. As such he won 20 total different Grand Prix events with wins in Qatar, Turkey, China, Catalunya, Great Britain, Laguna Seca, Czech Republic, San Marino, Phillip Island, Malaysia, Netherlands, Germany, Valencia, Italy, Aragon, Japan, France, Indianapolis, Jerez, and Portugal.

By season[edit]

Season Class Bike Team Race Win Pod Pole FLap Pts Plcd WCh
2001 125cc Honda RS125R Telefónica MoviStar jnr Team 2 0 0 0 0 4 29th
2002 250cc Aprilia RS250 Team LCR 15 0 0 0 0 68 12th
2003 125cc Aprilia RS125 Team LCR 14 1 4 1 2 125 8th
2004 125cc KTM 125 FPR Red Bull KTM 14 1 6 1 1 145 5th
2005 250cc Aprilia RSA 250 Team LCR 16 5 10 2 1 254 2nd
2006 MotoGP Honda RC211V Team LCR 16 0 1 1 0 119 8th
2007 MotoGP Ducati GP7 Ducati Marlboro 18 10 14 5 6 367 1st 1
2008 MotoGP Ducati GP8 Ducati Marlboro 18 6 11 9 9 280 2nd
2009 MotoGP Ducati GP9 Ducati Marlboro 13 4 8 3 2 220 4th
2010 MotoGP Ducati GP10 Ducati Marlboro 18 3 9 4 3 225 4th
2011 MotoGP Honda RC212V Repsol Honda 17 10 16 12 7 350 1st 1
2012 MotoGP Honda RC213V Repsol Honda 15 5 10 5 2 254 3rd
Total 176 45 89 43 33 2411 2

By class[edit]

Class Season First Races First Podium First Win Race Wins Podiums Poles FLaps Pts WChmps
125 cc 2001, 2003–2004 2001 Britain 2003 Germany 2003 Valencia 30 2 10 2 3 274 0
250 cc 2002, 2005 2002 Japan 2005 Portugal 2005 Portugal 31 5 10 2 1 322 0
MotoGP 2006–2012 2006 Spain 2006 Turkey 2007 Qatar 115 38 69 39 29 1815 2
Total 2001–2012 176 45 89 43 33 2411 2

Races by year[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Class Bike 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Pos Pts
2001 125cc Honda JPN RSA SPA FRA ITA CAT NED GBR
17
GER CZE POR VAL PAC AUS
12
MAL BRA 29th 4
2002 250 cc Aprilia JPN
Ret
RSA
Ret
SPA
6
FRA
Ret
ITA CAT
6
NED
8
GBR
11
GER
Ret
CZE
5
POR
Ret
BRA
6
PAC
17
MAL
11
AUS
10
VAL
13
12th 68
2003 125 cc Aprilia JPN
Ret
RSA
10
SPA
6
FRA
4
ITA
18
CAT
Ret
NED
Ret
GBR
5
GER
2
CZE POR BRA
2
PAC
2
MAL
Ret
AUS
Ret
VAL
1
8th 125
2004 125 cc KTM RSA
3
SPA
5
FRA
8
ITA
2
CAT
4
NED
3
BRA
2
GER GBR CZE
Ret
POR
Ret
JPN
Ret
QAT
Ret
MAL
1
AUS
3
VAL
Ret
5th 145
2005 250 cc Aprilia SPA
Ret
POR
1
CHN
1
FRA
4
ITA
4
CAT
2
NED
6
GBR
3
GER
7
CZE
3
JPN
3
MAL
1
QAT
1
AUS
Ret
TUR
1
VAL
3
2nd 254
2006 MotoGP Honda SPA
6
QAT
5
TUR
2
CHN
5
FRA
4
ITA
Ret
CAT
Ret
NED
4
GBR
4
GER
DNS
USA
Ret
CZE
6
MAL
8
AUS
6
JPN
Ret
POR
Ret
VAL
Ret
8th 119
2007 MotoGP Ducati QAT
1
SPA
5
TUR
1
CHN
1
FRA
3
ITA
4
CAT
1
GBR
1
NED
2
GER
5
USA
1
CZE
1
RSM
1
POR
3
JPN
6
AUS
1
MAL
1
VAL
2
1st 367
2008 MotoGP Ducati QAT
1
SPA
11
POR
6
CHN
3
FRA
16
ITA
2
CAT
3
GBR
1
NED
1
GER
1
USA
2
CZE
Ret
RSM
Ret
IND
4
JPN
2
AUS
1
MAL
6
VAL
1
2nd 280
2009 MotoGP Ducati QAT
1
JPN
4
SPA
3
FRA
5
ITA
1
CAT
3
NED
3
USA
4
GER
4
GBR
14
CZE IND RSM POR
2
AUS
1
MAL
1
VAL
DNS
4th 220
2010 MotoGP Ducati QAT
Ret
SPA
5
FRA
Ret
ITA
4
GBR
5
NED
3
CAT
3
GER
3
USA
2
CZE
3
IND
Ret
RSM
5
ARA
1
JPN
1
MAL
Ret
AUS
1
POR
Ret
VAL
2
4th 225
2011 MotoGP Honda QAT
1
SPA
Ret
POR
3
FRA
1
CAT
1
GBR
1
NED
2
ITA
3
GER
3
USA
1
CZE
1
IND
1
RSM
3
ARA
1
JPN
3
AUS
1
MAL
C
VAL
1
1st 350
2012 MotoGP Honda QAT
3
SPA
1
POR
1
FRA
3
CAT
4
GBR
2
NED
1
GER
Ret
ITA
8
USA
1
IND
4
CZE RSM ARA JPN
5
MAL
3
AUS
1
VAL
3
3rd 254

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Nicky Hayden
MotoGP Motorcycle World Champion
2007
Succeeded by
Valentino Rossi
Preceded by
Jorge Lorenzo
MotoGP Motorcycle World Champion
2011
Succeeded by
Jorge Lorenzo
Preceded by
Tania Major
Young Australian of the Year
2008
Succeeded by
Jonty Bush