Ogden Dunes, Indiana

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Ogden Dunes, Indiana
Town
Location of Ogden Dunes in the state of Indiana
Location of Ogden Dunes in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 41°37′27″N 87°11′29″W / 41.62417°N 87.19139°W / 41.62417; -87.19139Coordinates: 41°37′27″N 87°11′29″W / 41.62417°N 87.19139°W / 41.62417; -87.19139
Country United States
State Indiana
County Porter
Township Portage
Area[1]
 • Total 1.46 sq mi (3.78 km2)
 • Land 0.74 sq mi (1.92 km2)
 • Water 0.72 sq mi (1.86 km2)
Elevation 610 ft (186 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,110
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,112
 • Density 1,500.0/sq mi (579.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 46368
Area code(s) 219
FIPS code 18-56088[4]
GNIS feature ID 0449814[5]

Ogden Dunes is an affluent town on the shore of in Portage Township, Porter County, Indiana, United States. It is located on the shore of Lake Michigan, within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The population was 1,110 at the 2010 census. It is named for Francis A. Ogden, who owned the land there before his death in 1914.

Many residents of Ogden Dunes helped preserve parts of the Indiana Dunes.[6][7][8]

The town is the site of the Portage / Ogden Dunes station, which is served by South Shore Line passenger trains to and from Chicago. The principal thoroughfare serving the town is U.S. Route 12, which passes along the town's southern edge and connects it to nearby communities such as Gary to the west and Burns Harbor to the east.

Deer Cull Controversy[edit]

The peace and tranquility of Ogden Dunes was shattered in November 2011, when the town was divided by the controversial topic of deer management. Proponents of the deer cull say the population is out of control and blame deer for an outbreak of Lyme disease. While the size of the outbreak has never been officially studied, the scare was sufficient for pro-cull residents to pick up firearms with approval to eliminate 40 deer by February 15, 2012. Opponents of the cull claim town officials have not justified the killings and cannot substantiate claims of over population. Opponents also claim town officials are ignoring cases of poisoned deer. Opponents organized an action group called “Save our Deer”.

History[edit]

Ogden Dunes was once the home of a famous ski jump.[9] In 1927, the Grand Beach Ski Club, later the Ogden Dunes Ski Club, bought a piece of land on one of the high dunes in the town. They constructed a 192 feet (59 m)-tall ski jump. The first meet was held on January 22, 1928. For the next four years, meets were held in Ogden Dunes. The longest jump ever reported on this structure was 195 feet. In 1932, the Norwegian Olympic Team of Birger Rund, Hans Beck, and Kaare Wahlberg (gold, silver, and bronze medalists) came to Ogden Dunes to try the tower. During the Great Depression the Ski Club had financial setbacks; combined with little snow, the club looked to sell the tower. In 1935, a ski club in Rockford, Illinois, purchased the tower and moved it that summer.[10]

Geography[edit]

Ogden Dunes is located at 41°37′27″N 87°11′29″W / 41.62417°N 87.19139°W / 41.62417; -87.19139 (41.624250, -87.191338).[11]

According to the 2010 census, the town has a total area of 1.46 square miles (3.8 km2), of which 0.74 square miles (1.9 km2) (or 50.68%) is land and 0.72 square miles (1.9 km2) (or 49.32%) is water.[1]

Ogden Dunes is located in Portage Township, Porter County, Indiana. It has very few stores, as it is primarily a residential community. Neighboring Ogden Dunes are several similar enclaves within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore: Miller Beach to the west, Beverly Shores and Dune Acres to the east. Like Ogden Dunes, a considerable portion of the residences in these communities are occupied as summer or weekend homes by Chicagoans.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 50
1940 144 188.0%
1950 429 197.9%
1960 947 120.7%
1970 1,361 43.7%
1980 1,489 9.4%
1990 1,499 0.7%
2000 1,313 −12.4%
2010 1,110 −15.5%
Source: US Census Bureau

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,110 people, 508 households, and 335 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,500.0 inhabitants per square mile (579.2/km2). There were 619 housing units at an average density of 836.5 per square mile (323.0/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 96.1% White, 1.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.3% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population.

There were 508 households of which 19.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.9% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.1% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.67.

The median age in the town was 55.1 years. 15.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 12.2% were from 25 to 44; 41.8% were from 45 to 64; and 25.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 49.7% male and 50.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,313 people, 562 households, and 417 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,798.3 people per square mile (694.5/km²). There were 627 housing units at an average density of 858.8 per square mile (331.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.55% White, 0.23% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.23% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.36% of the population.

There were 562 households out of which 23.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.8% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 20.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.70.

In the town the population was spread out with 18.0% under the age of 18, 3.4% from 18 to 24, 20.6% from 25 to 44, 37.0% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $76,924, and the median income for a family was $90,719. Males had a median income of $61,111 versus $41,667 for females. The per capita income for the town was $49,852. About 2.2% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.4% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Places: Indiana". 2010 Census Gazetteer Files. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-04-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Smith, S. & Mark, S. (2006). Alice Gray, Dorothy Buell, and Naomi Svihla: Preservationists of Ogden Dunes. The South Shore Journal, 1. http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/issues/volume-1-2006/78-journals/vol-1-2006/117-alice-gray-dorothy-buell-and-naomi-svihla-preservationists-of-ogden-dunes
  7. ^ Smith, S. & Mark, S. (2009). The Historical Roots of the Nature Conservancy in the Northwest Indiana/Chicagoland Region: From Science to Preservation. The South Shore Journal, 3. http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/issues/volume-3-2009/83-journals/vol-3-2009/75-the-historical-roots-of-the-nature-conservancy-in-the-northwest-indianachicagoland-region-from-science-to-preservation
  8. ^ Smith, S. & Mark, S. (2007). The cultural impact of a museum in a small community: The Hour Glass of Ogden Dunes. The South Shore Journal, 2. http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/issues/volume-2-2007/82-journals/vol-2-2007/104-the-cultural-impact-of-a-museum-in-a-small-community-the-hour-glass-in-ogden-dunes
  9. ^ "Porter County, Indiana, GenWeb - Photographs & Historical Images". Retrieved March 10, 2011. 
  10. ^ A Part of the Indiana GenWeb Project
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.