Plumbridge

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Coordinates: 54°46′05″N 7°15′04″W / 54.768°N 7.251°W / 54.768; -7.251

Bridge over the Glenelly River

Plumbridge is a small village in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It is a crossroads village, standing on the banks of the Glenelly River. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 267 people. It lies within the Strabane District Council area.[1]

Most of the village is on the northern bank of the Glenelly River, within the townland of Glencoppogagh.[2] However, some of it lies on the southern bank, within the townland of Lisnacreaght.[3]

Religion[edit]

The Roman Catholic church is Sacred Heart Church, a Grade B2 listed building,[4] and the Presbyterian church is Glenelly Presbyterian Church, Plumbridge. The village's local Church of Ireland church is St Patrick's, Upper Badoney, a few miles up the Glenelly valley. The site of Upper Badoney is associated with Christianity since the days of St Patrick.[citation needed]

Sport[edit]

The local Gaelic Athletic Association club, Glenelly St. Joseph's, was established in 1981. There are ladies teams and men's teams. It is commonly referred to as Glenelly.[5] The Village had a local softball team from 1999-2002, but was disbanded due to match fixing allegations from the ISA (Irish softball association).

History[edit]

Among the notable persons that have come from Plumbridge are professor James MacCullagh, of Trinity College Dublin, American frontiersman Robert Campbell,[citation needed] and Minnesota legislator Robert Campbell Dunn.[6]

In 2012 the Royal Black Institution held its annual Black Saturday parade in Plumbridge for the first time since 1958.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Plumbridge". NI Neighbourhood Information System, Gazeteer of Settlements. Retrieved 16 January 2011. 
  2. ^ Placenames NI: Glencoppogagh
  3. ^ Placenames NI: Lisnacreaght
  4. ^ "Sacred Heart Church, Plumbridge". Department of the Environment NI Buildings Database. Retrieved 16 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "About us". Glenelly St. Joseph's GAC. Retrieved 2009-02-25. 
  6. ^ http://www.mnhs.org/library/findaids/00599.xml
  7. ^ "On march for Last Saturday" The Newsletter 24 August 2012 Retrieved 16 September 2012