Soquel, California

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Soquel
census-designated place
Soquel as seen from a hilltop in Anna_Jean_Cummings_Park
Soquel as seen from a hilltop in Anna_Jean_Cummings_Park
Location in Santa Cruz County and the state of California
Location in Santa Cruz County and the state of California
Coordinates: 36°59′13″N 121°56′44″W / 36.98694°N 121.94556°W / 36.98694; -121.94556Coordinates: 36°59′13″N 121°56′44″W / 36.98694°N 121.94556°W / 36.98694; -121.94556
Country  United States
State  California
County Santa Cruz
Area[1]
 • Total 4.598 sq mi (11.909 km2)
 • Land 4.598 sq mi (11.909 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation 33 ft (10 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 9,644
 • Density 2,100/sq mi (810/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 95073
Area code(s) 831
FIPS code 06-72688
GNIS feature ID 1659817

Soquel /sˈkɛl/ is a census-designated place (CDP) in Santa Cruz County, California, United States. The population was 9,644 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Soquel is located at 36°59′13″N 121°56′44″W / 36.98694°N 121.94556°W / 36.98694; -121.94556 (36.986991, -121.945636).[2]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.6 square miles (11.9 km²), all of it land.

Demographics[edit]

A residential neighborhood in Soquel
Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 328
1890 2,982 809.1%
1900 2,987 0.2%
1970 5,795
1980 6,212 7.2%
1990 9,188 47.9%
2000 5,081 −44.7%
2010 9,644 89.8%

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[3] reported that Soquel had a population of 9,644. The population density was 2,097.4 people per square mile (809.8/km²). The racial makeup of Soquel was 7,898 (81.9%) White, 85 (0.9%) African American, 71 (0.7%) Native American, 356 (3.7%) Asian, 21 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 693 (7.2%) from other races, and 520 (5.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,606 persons (16.7%).

The Census reported that 9,595 people (99.5% of the population) lived in households, 49 (0.5%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 3,912 households, out of which 1,156 (29.6%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,758 (44.9%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 467 (11.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 174 (4.4%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 266 (6.8%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 39 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,128 households (28.8%) were made up of individuals and 411 (10.5%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45. There were 2,399 families (61.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.00.

The population was spread out with 1,942 people (20.1%) under the age of 18, 880 people (9.1%) aged 18 to 24, 2,215 people (23.0%) aged 25 to 44, 3,392 people (35.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,215 people (12.6%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.2 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.

There were 4,107 housing units at an average density of 893.2 per square mile (344.9/km²), of which 2,750 (70.3%) were owner-occupied, and 1,162 (29.7%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.4%; the rental vacancy rate was 2.4%. 6,654 people (69.0% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 2,941 people (30.5%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 5,081 people, 2,043 households, and 1,229 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,710.3 people per square mile (1,816.5/km²). There were 2,103 housing units at an average density of 1,949.6 per square mile (751.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 82.94% White, 1.57% African American, 0.63% Native American, 4.00% Asian, 0.18% Pacific Islander, 6.18% from other races, and 4.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.99% of the population.

There were 2,043 households out of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.1% were married couples living together, 14.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the CDP, the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 32.3% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 87.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.5 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $55,230, and the median income for a family was $61,167. Males had a median income of $48,750 versus $32,721 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $28,360. About 6.5% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.8% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

In the state legislature, Soquel is located in the 11th Senate District, represented by Democrat Joe Simitian, and in the 27th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Bill Monning.

In the United States House of Representatives, Soquel is in California's 20th congressional district, represented by Democrat Sam Farr.[5]

History[edit]

Downtown Soquel

The name Soquel has a somewhat unknown history. The Ohlone Indians were the native tribe in the area and the Spanish phonetic rendering of their word for the creek which runs through the community was Osocalis, which Americans eventually morphed into Soquel.

The first European land exploration of Alta California, the Spanish Portolà expedition, passed through the area on its way north, camping at one of the creeks on October 16, 1769. The expedition diaries don't provide enough information to be sure which creek it was, but the direction of travel was northwest, parallel to the coast. Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi, traveling with the expedition, noted in his diary that, "We stopped on the bank of a small stream, which has about four varas of deep running water. It has on its banks a good growth of cottonwoods and alders; on account of the depth at which it runs it may be that it cannot be utilized to water some plains through which it runs."[6] Translator Herbert Bolton speculated that the location was Soquel Creek.

Martina Castro was granted Rancho Soquel by Alta California governor José Figueroa in 1833.[7] Martina was one of the daughters of Santa Cruz fundadore José Joaquín Castro, who came as a boy with his family to Alta California from Mexico with the second De Anza expedition in 1775. Several of Martina's Californio brothers and sisters also became rancheros.

The town of Soquel is notorious for its flooding. The lowlands in and around the Soquel Creek have flooded many times. The most recent flood was in January 1982,[7] and it nearly topped its banks in 1986. Uncleared log jams downstream in the city of Capitola have been blamed for the flooding. Capitola City Planner Richard Steele implemented a debris removal program after the near flooding in 1986.

Recreation[edit]

Anna Jean Cummings Park is the largest park in Soquel, with playfields for soccer, baseball, and softball, playgrounds, picnic areas, and a large open space of coastal prairie terrace. It is operated by the Santa Cruz County Parks Department.[8] Others include Richard Vessey, Soquel Lions, and Willowbrook Park. Another park without an official name is under development on a property once called "The Farm". The Land Trust of Santa Cruz County also owns two protected lands on Fairway Drive, the Greenspace Garden and the Fairway Drive Coastal Prairie Terrrace. [9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer File - Places - California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 13, 2014. 
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Soquel CDP". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "California's 20th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. 
  6. ^ Bolton, Herbert E. (1927). Fray Juan Crespi: Missionary Explorer on the Pacific Coast, 1769-1774. HathiTrust Digital Library. p. 214. Retrieved April 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "A Soquel History Tale". Capitola Historical Museum. Retrieved 2009-10-10. 
  8. ^ "Santa Cruz County Park List". Santa Cruz County Parks Department. 
  9. ^ "Protected Lands Map". Land Trust of Santa Cruz County. 

External links[edit]