Switzerland Davis Cup team

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Switzerland
Flag of Switzerland.svg
Captain Severin Lüthi
ITF ranking 2
Highest ITF ranking 2 (24 November 2014)
Colors Red & white
First year 1923
Years played 85
Ties played (W–L) 160 (76–84)
Years in
World Group
23 (13–22)
Davis Cup titles 1 (2014)
Runners-up 1 (1992)
Most total wins Roger Federer (50–17)
Most singles wins Roger Federer (38–8)
Most doubles wins Jakob Hlasek (15–10)
Best doubles team Jakob Hlasek/
Marc Rosset (7–5)
Markus Günthardt/
Heinz Günthardt (7–5)
Most ties played Heinz Gunthardt (30)
Most years played Heinz Gunthardt (15)

The Switzerland Davis Cup team represents Switzerland in the Davis Cup tennis competition and is governed by Swiss Tennis.

In 2007, Switzerland competed in the World Group for the 13th consecutive year - the third longest ongoing streak - before being relegated after losing 3–2 against the Czech Republic.

Switzerland, with 17-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer and reigning Australian Open champion Stanislas Wawrinka in the team, won its first Davis Cup title in 2014.

Current squad (2014)[edit]

Player Career High Rank First year played Total Win/Loss Singles Win/Loss Doubles Win/Loss
Roger Federer 1 1999 50–17 38–8 12–9
Stanislas Wawrinka 3 2004 25–25 21–13 4–12
Marco Chiudinelli 52 2005 7–15 6–11 1–4
Michael Lammer 150 2006 4–7 1–7 3–0

History[edit]

Switzerland competed in its first Davis Cup in the 1923. They won the Davis Cup title for the first time in 2014, defeating France in the final by three rubbers to one, Roger Federer's victory over Richard Gasquet in the first reverse singles rubber clinching the title for the Swiss.

Switzerland has reached one other final, losing to the USA in 1992, as well as being semifinalists in 2003, and quarterfinalists in 1998, 1999, 2001 and 2004.

1992 campaign[edit]

1992 is the year when tennis became extremely popular in Switzerland. First, Marc Rosset and Jakob Hlasek won the 1992 French Open title in doubles. Marc Rosset went on to win the Olympics single title in Barcelona. The Davis Cup campaign completed this exceptional year for Swiss tennis. The team was led by Marc Rosset and Jakob Hlasek and completed by Claudio Mezzadri and Thierry Grin. It lost the final 3-1 to a tough United States team consisting of Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, Pete Sampras, and John McEnroe.

After a comfortable 4-1 win against the Netherlands in The Hague, Switzerland travelled to the picturesque Arena of Nîmes to play France on clay in the quarterfinals. The Roman amphitheater was semi-covered for this event. Switzerland won 3-2 and recorded its first ever victory against a French team when Jakob Hlasek scored the decisive point against French clay court specialist Thierry Champion.

The semifinal against Brazil (won 5-0) in the Geneva Palexpo established a new World record for the largest attendance at an indoor tennis event at that time (15'000 people). The tie was played on an extremely fast Taraflex court, which favoured the fast serving Marc Rosset against Brazilian players traditionally used to play on much slower clay courts. Brazil had shocked Germany and Italy in the previous rounds, both played in Brazil. The Swiss team was mostly concerned about Jaime Oncins who was featuring a 9-0 record in Davis Cup before the semifinal. Oncins had also reached the quarterfinals of the Olympics a few months before. Oncins did not win a single set in Geneva. The tie was decided after the doubles already with a straight set win of Hlasek/Rosset against the experienced pair Roese/Motta.


Switzerland
5
Palexpo, Geneva, Switzerland[1]
25–27 September 1992
Hard (i)

Brazil
0
1 2 3 4 5
1 Switzerland
Brazil
Marc Rosset
Jaime Oncins
6
3
7
5
7
5
     
2 Switzerland
Brazil
Jakob Hlasek
Luiz Mattar
6
2
6
3
65
77
6
3
   
3 Switzerland
Brazil
Marc Rosset / Jakob Hlasek
Cassio Motta / Fernando Roese
6
3
6
4
6
3
     
4 Switzerland
Brazil
Jakob Hlasek
Jaime Oncins
6
4
6
2
       
5 Switzerland
Brazil
Marc Rosset
Luiz Mattar
77
62
6
3
       

The final was played in Fort Worth, Texas. Switzerland fired their captain Roland Stadler after the semifinals for reasons which remain unclear. He was replaced by former player and multiple Swiss champion Tim Sturdza from Romanian aristocratic origin. Andre Agassi put the USA 1-0 ahead with a very clear win over Jakob Hlasek in which Hlasek only won a total of 5 games in 3 sets. Marc Rosset levelled the game with a hard-fought win over Jim Courier, whom he had beaten in the Olympics the same year. The doubles proved to be the turning point of the tie. After the Swiss won the two first sets 7-6, John McEnroe managed to fire upPete Sampras who had been inexistent during the two first sets. The USA won the third set 7-5 and then took the two remaining sets easily. On Sunday, Courier secured the title for the USA with a 4 sets win against Hlasek.


United States
3
Tarrant County Center, Fort Worth, United States[2]
4–6 December 1992
Hard (i)

Switzerland
1
1 2 3 4 5
1 United States
Switzerland
Andre Agassi
Jakob Hlasek
6
1
6
2
6
2
     
2 United States
Switzerland
Jim Courier
Marc Rosset
3
6
711
69
6
3
4
6
4
6
 
3 United States
Switzerland
John McEnroe / Pete Sampras
Jakob Hlasek / Marc Rosset
65
77
68
710
7
5
6
1
6
2
 
4 United States
Switzerland
Jim Courier
Jakob Hlasek
6
3
3
6
6
3
6
4
   
5 United States
Switzerland
Andre Agassi
Marc Rosset
          not
played

The fifth rubber between Andre Agassi and Marc Rosset was not played. Annoyed by Agassi's behaviour during the tie (especially some alleged verbal agression against Hlasek), Rosset later stated that he was ready to "explode Agassi" in the fifth rubber and that this would have been the kind of game that would have excited him a lot. One year later, Rosset faced Agassi in 1993 Indian Wells and won 36/76/64.

2003 campaign[edit]

The Swiss Team in 2003 had the particularity to have a playing captain in the person of 1992 Olympic champion and Davis Cup finalist Marc Rosset, who partnered Federer in the doubles against France (QF) and Australia (SF). The 2003 team further included Michel Kratochvil and George Bastl. The team had to play its 3 matches away from home.

After a very tight first round in Arnhem, Netherlands (Michel Kratochvil won the decisive rubber against Martin Verkerk), Switzerland recorded a convincing win against France in Toulouse during which Rosset/Federer showed their strength as a doubles team and Federer outplayed Fabrice Santoro 6-1 6-0 6-2 in the 4th rubber.

For the semifinal, Switzerland had to travel to the Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne to face Australia with Hewitt, Philippoussis and doubles specialists Woodbridge and Arthurs. After the expected wins of Hewitt against Kratochvil and Federer against Phlippoussis, the doubles appeared to be the turning point, very much like in the 1992 final. Federer/Rosset lost in 5 sets and Federer then had to play Hewitt for survival. After losing the first two sets 7-5 and 6-2, Hewitt fought back and won the next three sets 7-6 7-5 6-1. This is still considered one of Federer's most painful defeats ever and he was still in tears many hours after the game.


Australia
3
Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia[3]
19–21 September 2003
Hard

Switzerland
2
1 2 3 4 5
1 Australia
Switzerland
Lleyton Hewitt
Michel Kratochvil
6
4
6
4
6
1
     
2 Australia
Switzerland
Mark Philippoussis
Roger Federer
3
6
4
6
63
77
     
3 Australia
Switzerland
Wayne Arthurs / Todd Woodbridge
Roger Federer / Marc Rosset
4
6
77
65
5
7
6
4
6
4
 
4 Australia
Switzerland
Lleyton Hewitt
Roger Federer
5
7
2
6
77
64
7
5
6
1
 
5 Australia
Switzerland
Todd Woodbridge
Michel Kratochvil
4
6
        retired
 


For the final, Switzerland would have faced Spain in the Bern Arena, which was already booked to receive the event.

2014 campaign[edit]

After the failed attempt of 2003, Switzerland never came really close to a semifinal again. However, 2014 suddenly became the year of great hopes when Federer declared himself available for the first round of the World Group against Serbia, who was playing without its best players Djokovic (exhausted after the Australian Open), Tipsarevic (injured) and Troicki (suspended). Also, the Swiss Team now comprised for the first time two Grand Slam champions after Wawrinka won the Australian Open 2014.

The draw for the World Group looked quite favourable for the Swiss with a quarterfinal against Kazakhstan or Belgium and possibly a semifinal against Italy (led by Fognini) or Great Britain (led by Murray).

Switzerland won the first round against a Serbian "B-Team" 3-2 in Novi Sad. The game was decided 3-0 on Saturday already after Chiudinelli and Lammer brought the winning point in the doubles.

For the quarterfinal, Switzerland faced Kazakhstan in Geneva. A poor performance by Wawrinka (lost his first singles and the doubles) almost caused the elimination of the Swiss team, so that Federer had to play a deciding fifth rubber (after Wawrinka had regained his form to win the fourth rubber) against Golubev, which he won. With this victory, Roger Federer succeeded to Jakob Hlasek as the Swiss player with most singles wins (35).

For the semifinal against Italy, a new record attendance for a Swiss Tennis game was set with a public of 18'400 in the Geneva Palexpo. All tickets were sold out in less than 3 hours. Captains Severin Lüthi and Corrado Barazzutti called the following players:

Switzerland: Roger Federer (ATP 3), Stan Wawrinka (ATP 4), Marco Chiudinelli (ATP 161), Michael Lammer (ATP 497).

Italy: Fabio Fognini (ATP 17), Andreas Seppi (ATP 48), Simone Bolelli (ATP 76), Paolo Lorenzi (ATP 78).

For the Swiss Team, Yann Marti (ATP 209) was called as a fifth player acting as a sparring partner. He was allowed to wear the team uniform for the first time and to stay with the team the whole week.

Both Federer and Wawrinka won their first singles in straight sets and were first expected to play together in the doubles on Saturday. However, due to his fatigue after the US Open, Federer asked not to play in order to be fresh in case he would need to play on Sunday. Wawrinka had to play the doubles with Chiudinelli and they lost in five sets to Fognini/Bolelli. This was the third defeat of the pair Wawrinka/Chiudinelli in three Davis Cup matches. They had already lost together against Italy in 2009.

For the decisive rubber on Sunday, Roger Federer faced Fabio Fognini and won in straight sets, qualifying Switzerland for its second final after 1992.



Switzerland
3
Palexpo, Geneva, Switzerland[4]
12–14 September 2014
Hard (i)

Italy
2
1 2 3 4 5
1 Switzerland
Italy
Roger Federer
Simone Bolelli
77
65
6
4
6
4
     
2 Switzerland
Italy
Stan Wawrinka
Fabio Fognini
6
2
6
3
6
2
     
3 Switzerland
Italy
Stan Wawrinka / Marco Chiudinelli
Simone Bolelli / Fabio Fognini
5
7
6
3
7
5
3
6
2
6
 
4 Switzerland
Italy
Roger Federer
Fabio Fognini
6
2
6
3
77
65
     
5 Switzerland
Italy
Michael Lammer
Andreas Seppi
4
6
6
1
4
6
     


For the final against France, Switzerland had to travel to Villeneuve-d'Ascq, near Lille. The local football stadium, the Stade Pierre-Mauroy was transformed into a tennis stadium for this occasion, with a capacity of 30'000 people. The French decided to play on a clay court. This choice was mostly due to the fact that both Federer and Wawrinka were participating in the ATP World Tour Finals on a hard court one week before the Davis Cup final. However, French captain Arnaud Clément stated that the surface will not necessarily be an advantage for France, but at least it does not want it to be a disadvantage for the French team, this is why clay was selected. France will start practicing on the court 10 days before the final, while Federer and Wawrinka will still be playing in London on a hard court.

Initially, the French team also evoked the possibility to organize the final in one of their Overseas Territories in order to impose a massive jet lag on Federer and Wawrinka, both playing the ATP World Tour Finals in London one week before the Davis Cup final. Gilles Simon mentioned the city of Nouméa in New Caledonia as a potential venue.[5]

Interestingly, the previous memorable campaigns of 1992 and 2003 also saw the Swiss team play against France abroad. Both games ended with a Swiss victory (1992: QF won 3-2 in Nîmes; 2003: QF won 3-2 in Toulouse). At the same time, these were the only two Swiss victories in 12 encounters with France.

The preparation of the Swiss team for the final was overshadowed by the back injury of Roger Federer. He was playing at the London Masters the week before and won the semifinal in a very tight match against Stan Wawrinka, during which he injured his back. He subsequently had to withdraw from the final against Djokovic and he was unable to practice until the late evening of Wednesday before the final. This left Federer with very limited practice time for the transition from hard court (on which he played in Paris and London) to the clay court in Villeneuve-d'Ascq. The French team had no injury to report and prepared during 10 days on clay before the Final.

The captains nominated the following players:

France: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (ATP 12), Gaël Monfils (ATP 19), Julien Benneteau (ATP 25), Richard Gasquet (ATP 26).

Switzerland: Roger Federer (ATP 2), Stan Wawrinka (ATP 4), Marco Chiudinelli (ATP 212), Michael Lammer (ATP 508).

Federer's injury triggered discussions about the possible late nomination of a substitute. Yann Marti (ATP 227) was considered as a replacement, clay being his favourite type of court. Finally, Federer's health improved and no further nomination was made.

Despite a good end of season (runner-up in the ATP 1000 Shanghai), Gilles Simon, who had a better ranking than Benneteau and Gasquet (ATP 21), was left out of the French team. This was probably due to his bad previous results in Davis Cup and his inability to win decisive games in this competition.

With Federer's fourth round victory over Richard Gasquet in the reverse singles rubber, Switzerland secured its first Davis Cup win.[6][7]


France
1
Stade Pierre-Mauroy, Villeneuve-d'Ascq, France[8]
21–23 November 2014
Clay (i)

Switzerland
3
1 2 3 4 5
1 France
Switzerland
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
Stan Wawrinka
1
6
6
3
3
6
2
6
   
2 France
Switzerland
Gaël Monfils
Roger Federer
6
1
6
4
6
3
     
3 France
Switzerland
Julien Benneteau / Richard Gasquet
Roger Federer / Stan Wawrinka
3
6
5
7
4
6
     
4 France
Switzerland
Richard Gasquet
Roger Federer
4
6
2
6
2
6
     
5 France
Switzerland
Gaël Monfils
Stan Wawrinka
          not
played

Results[edit]

2010s[edit]

Year Competition Date Location Opponent Score Result
2010 World Group, First Round 5–7 Mar Spain Logrono  Spain 1–4 Lost
World Group, Play-offs 14–16 Sep Kazakhstan Astana  Kazakhstan 0–5 Lost
2011 Europe/Africa Group, Quarterfinals 8–10 Jul Switzerland Bern  Portugal 5–0 Won
World Group, Play-offs 16–18 Sep Australia Sydney  Australia 3–2 Won
2012 World Group, First Round 10–12 Feb Switzerland Fribourg  United States 0–5 Lost
World Group, Play-offs 14–16 Sep Netherlands Amsterdam  Netherlands 3–2 Won
2013 World Group, First Round 1–3 Feb Switzerland Geneva  Czech Republic 2–3 Lost
World Group, Play-offs 13–15 Sep Switzerland Neuchâtel  Ecuador 4–1 Won
2014 World Group, First Round 31 Jan–2 Feb Serbia Novi Sad  Serbia 3–2 Won
World Group, Quarterfinals 4–6 Apr Switzerland Geneva  Kazakhstan 3–2 Won
World Group, Semifinals 12–14 Sep Switzerland Geneva  Italy 3–2 Won
World Group, Final 21–23 Nov France Lille  France 3–1 Won
2015 World Group, First Round 6–8 Mar Belgium Liège  Belgium Pending

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Switzerland v Brazil". daviscup.com. 
  2. ^ "United States v Switzerland". daviscup.com. 
  3. ^ "Australia v Switzerland". daviscup.com. 
  4. ^ "Switzerland v Italy". daviscup.com. 
  5. ^ http://rmcsport.bfmtv.com/tennis/simon-veut-jouer-a-noumea-834182.html
  6. ^ "Tears of joy from Roger Federer as Switzerland win Davis Cup". Guardian. 23 November 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2014. 
  7. ^ "Roger Federer, Switzerland win first Davis Cup title". USA Today. 23 November 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2014. 
  8. ^ "France v Switzerland". daviscup.com. 

External links[edit]