Marc Rosset

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Marc Rosset
Country   Switzerland
Residence Monte Carlo, Monaco
Born (1970-11-07) 7 November 1970 (age 43)
Geneva, Switzerland
Height 2.01 metres (6 ft 7 in)
Turned pro 1988
Retired 2005
Plays

Right-handed (two-handed backhand)

*occasionally used one-handed backhand
Prize money $6,812,693
Singles
Career record 433–351
Career titles 15
Highest ranking No. 9 (11 September 1995)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1999)
French Open SF (1996)
Wimbledon 4R (2000)
US Open 4R (1995)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games Gold medal.svg Gold Medal (1992)
Doubles
Career record 142–144
Career titles 8
Highest ranking No. 8 (2 November 1992)
Last updated on: 29 August 2012.
Olympic medal record
Competitor for   Switzerland
Men's Tennis
Gold 1992 Barcelona Singles

Marc Rosset (born 7 November 1970 in Geneva, Switzerland) is a former professional tennis player from Switzerland who is best remembered for winning the Men's Singles Gold medal at the 1992 Olympic Games. He also won one Grand Slam doubles title at the French Open in 1992 partnering compatriot Jakob Hlasek.

Career[edit]

Juniors[edit]

As a junior, Rosset reached as high as No. 4 in the world junior rankings in 1988.

Junior Grand Slam results:

Australian Open: -
French Open: 1R (1988)
Wimbledon: 2R (1988)
US Open: –

Pro tour[edit]

Rosset turned professional in 1988 and won his first tour singles title in 1989 Geneva as a wildcard, defeating Guillermo Pérez Roldán. His first doubles title was also won in Geneva in 1991 partnering Sergi Bruguera.

1992 was the pinnacle of Rosset's career. Representing Switzerland at the Olympic Games in Barcelona, he defeated several big-name players en route to qualifying for the men's singles final, including Jim Courier, Goran Ivanišević, Wayne Ferreira, and Emilio Sánchez. In the final, he faced Spain's Jordi Arrese and won an exciting five-set match, 7–6, 6–4, 3–6, 4–6, 8–6, to claim the Gold Medal. Rosset also won the 1992 French Open men's doubles title partnering Jakob Hlasek. Rosset was also a member of the Swiss team which reached the final of the 1992 Davis Cup. Switzerland lost in the final to the United States, despite Rosset's winning a five-set singles rubber against Jim Courier (who was ranked the World No. 1 at the time).

Rosset's most memorable Davis Cup match came in defeat in a singles rubber against Arnaud Clément of France in 2001, which he lost 15–13 in the fifth set after 5 hours and 46 minutes. During the later years of his playing career, Rosset also served as the Swiss Davis Cup team captain.

Rosset also enjoyed success playing in other international team competitions for Switzerland. In 1996, he was a member of the teams which won the World Team Cup and finished runners-up in the Hopman Cup.

Rosset had a 2–2 record against his successor as Switzerland's top male tennis player, Roger Federer. Rosset won their first two meetings in 2000 (including the final of the Open 13 at Marseille), but Federer won their meetings in 2001 and 2003.[1]

At 2.01 metres (6 ft. 7 in.) Rosset was one of the game's tallest players throughout his career. He had a reputation for being one of the most powerful servers in tennis. He was one of the game's fastest servers and most prolific servers of aces for most of his career.

Rosset changed his flight plans after a first-round defeat at the US Open in September 1998. After he changed his plans, the flight he had originally planned to take, Swissair Flight 111, crashed in the Atlantic Ocean, killing all on board.[2]

Rosset's career-high ATP singles ranking was World No. 9, and his career-high doubles ranking was World No. 8. He won a total of 15 top-level singles titles and 8 doubles titles. He won at least one singles title on all surfaces: clay, grass, carpet, and hard court. His career prize money totaled $6,812,693.

Career statistics[edit]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Finals: 1 (1 title)
Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1992 French Open Clay Switzerland Jakob Hlasek South Africa David Adams
Russia Andrei Olhovskiy
7–6(7–4), 6–7(3–7), 7–5

Olympic Games[edit]

Finals: 1 (1 gold medal)
Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1992 Barcelona Olympics Clay Spain Jordi Arrese 7–6(7–2), 6–4, 3–6, 4–6, 8–6

Career finals[edit]

Singles: 23 (15–8)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (0–0)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
Olympic Gold Medal (1–0)
ATP Masters Series (0–1)
ATP Championship Series (2–3)
ATP Tour (12–4)
Titles by Surface
Hard (4–3)
Clay (3–2)
Grass (1–0)
Carpet (7–3)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1. 17 September 1989 Geneva, Switzerland Clay Argentina Guillermo Pérez Roldán 6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 1. 6 April 1990 Madrid, Spain Clay Ecuador Andres Gomez 6–3, 7–6
Runner-up 2. 27 May 1990 Bologna, Italy Clay Australia Richard Fromberg 4–6, 6–4, 7–6
Winner 2. 22 October 1990 Lyon, France Carpet (i) Sweden Mats Wilander 6–3, 6–2
Winner 3. 3 August 1992 Summer Olympics, Barcelona, Spain Clay Spain Jordi Arrese 7–6(7–2), 6–4, 3–6, 4–6, 8–6
Winner 4. 16 November 1992 Moscow, Russia Carpet (i) Germany Carl Uwe Steeb 6–3, 6–2
Winner 5. 8 February 1993 Marseille, France Carpet (i) Netherlands Jan Siemerink 6–2, 7–6(7–1)
Winner 6. 30 August 1993 Long Island, USA Hard United States Michael Chang 6–4, 3–6, 6–1
Winner 7. 15 November 1993 Moscow, Russia Carpet (i) Germany Patrik Kühnen 6–4, 6–3
Winner 8. 7 February 1994 Marseille, France Carpet (i) France Arnaud Boetsch 7–6(8–6), 7–6(7–4)
Runner-up 3. 20 August 1994 New Haven, United States Hard Germany Boris Becker 6–3, 7–5
Winner 9. 24 October 1994 Lyon, France Carpet (i) United States Jim Courier 6–4, 7–6(7–2)
Runner-up 4. 6 November 1994 Paris, France Carpet (i) United States Andre Agassi 3–6, 3–6, 6–4, 5–7
Winner 10. 24 April 1995 Nice, France Clay Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–0
Winner 11. 26 June 1995 Halle, Germany Grass Germany Michael Stich 3–6, 7–6(13–11), 7–6(10–8)
Runner-up 5. 3 March 1996 Milan, Italy Carpet (i) Croatia Goran Ivanišević 3–6, 6–7(7–3)
Winner 12. 24 February 1997 Antwerp, Belgium Hard (i) United Kingdom Tim Henman 6–2, 7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 6. 14 September 1997 Tashkent, Uzbekistan Hard United Kingdom Tim Henman 7–6(7–2), 6–4
Runner-up 7. 15 February 1998 St. Petersburg, Russia Carpet (i) Netherlands Richard Krajicek 4–6, 6–7(5–7)
Runner-up 8. 22 February 1997 Antwerp, Belgium Hard United Kingdom Greg Rusedski 6–7(3–7), 6–3, 1–6, 4–6,
Winner 13. 15 February 1999 St. Petersburg, Russia Carpet (i) Germany David Prinosil 6–3, 6–4
Winner 14. 14 February 2000 Marseille, France Hard (i) Switzerland Roger Federer 2–6, 6–3, 7–6(7–5)
Winner 15. 22 October 2000 London, UK Hard (i) Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–4

Singles performance timeline[edit]

Tournament 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Career SR
Grand Slams
Australian Open A A 1R 1R 4R A 3R 1R A 2R 2R QF 2R 2R A 1R A A 0 / 11
French Open A A 2R 1R 1R 2R 1R 2R SF 4R 1R 1R 2R 1R A 1R A A 0 / 13
Wimbledon A A 3R 1R 3R 1R 2R 1R 3R 2R 2R 2R 4R 1R 2R 1R A A 0 / 14
U.S. Open A A 1R 1R 1R 1R 3R 4R 1R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R A A A 0 / 13
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 2 0 / 3 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 51
Masters Series
Indian Wells NME A 2R 1R QF 3R A 1R 3R 1R A A 1R A A A A 0 / 7
Miami NME 1R QF 3R 4R 3R A 4R 2R 3R 2R 1R 1R 1R A A A 0 / 12
Monte Carlo NME QF 1R 3R 3R 1R 3R 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 1R A A A A 0 / 12
Rome NME A 1R 3R 3R 1R 1R 3R 3R A 1R 1R A A A A A 0 / 9
Hamburg NME A 1R A 2R 1R QF 3R 1R 1R 2R 3R 1R A A A A 0 / 10
Canada NME A A A A 3R 2R 2R A A A 1R A A A A A 0 / 4
Cincinnati NME A A 1R A A A 1R A A A 1R A A A A A 0 / 3
Stuttgart (Stockholm) NME 3R 1R A SF 3R 3R 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R A A A A A 0 / 10
Paris NME 3R 1R 1R 3R F 3R QF 1R 3R 3R 3R A A A A A 0 / 11
Masters Series SR N/A 0 / 4 0 / 7 0 / 6 0 / 7 0 / 8 0 / 6 0 / 9 0 / 7 0 / 6 0 / 6 0 / 8 0 / 4 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 78
Year End Ranking 474 45 22 60 35 16 14 15 22 31 31 46 28 119 101 122 214 1306 N/A

Doubles: 12 (9–3)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partnering Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 16 September 1991 Geneva, Switzerland Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera Sweden Per Henricsson
Sweden Ola Jonsson
3–6, 6–3, 6–3
Winner 2. 6 January 1992 Adelaide, Australia Hard Croatia Goran Ivanišević Australia Mark Kratzmann
Australia Jason Stoltenberg
7–6, 7–6
Winner 3. 18 May 1992 Rome, Italy Clay Switzerland Jakob Hlasek South Africa Wayne Ferreira
Australia Mark Kratzmann
6–4, 3–6, 6–1
Winner 4. 8 June 1992 French Open, Paris, France Clay Switzerland Jakob Hlasek South Africa David Adams
Russia Andrei Olhovskiy
7–6, 6–7, 7–5
Runner-up 1. 13 June 1992 Stuttgart, Germany Clay Spain Javier Sanchez United States Glenn Layendecker
South Africa Byron Talbot
6–4, 3–6, 4–6
Winner 5. 26 October 1992 Lyon, France Carpet Switzerland Jakob Hlasek United Kingdom Neil Broad
South Africa Stefan Kruger
6–1, 6–3
Winner 6. 12 July 1993 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay France Cédric Pioline Netherlands Hendrik Jan Davids
South Africa Piet Norval
6–3, 3–6, 7–6
Runner-up 2. 10 July 1995 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay France Arnaud Boetsch Argentina Luis Lobo
Spain Javier Sánchez
7–6, 6–7, 6–7
Winner 7. 20 May 1996 World Team Cup, Germany Clay Switzerland Jakob Hlasek Czech Republic Petr Korda
Czech Republic Daniel Vacek
6–3, 6–4
Winner 8. 6 October 1997 Basel, Switzerland Carpet United Kingdom Tim Henman Germany Karsten Braasch
United States Jim Grabb
7–6, 6–7, 7–6
Winner 9. 20 September 1999 Tashkent, Uzbekistan Hard Uzbekistan Oleg Ogorodov United States Mark Keil
Switzerland Lorenzo Manta
7–6, 7–6
Runner-up 3. 5 July 2004 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Switzerland Stanislas Wawrinka India Leander Paes
Czech Republic David Rikl
4–6, 2–6

References[edit]

External links[edit]