Tomball High School

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Tomball High School
Address
30330 Quinn Road
Tomball, Texas, 77375
United States
Coordinates 30°6′40″N 95°37′43″W / 30.11111°N 95.62861°W / 30.11111; -95.62861Coordinates: 30°6′40″N 95°37′43″W / 30.11111°N 95.62861°W / 30.11111; -95.62861
Information
Type Public high school
Motto "It's a great day to be a Cougar because WE ARE The Pride of Texas"
Established 1908
(Current building: 1974)
School district Tomball Independent School District
Principal Greg Quinn
Faculty 155 (on FTE basis)
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 3,459 (2008-09)
Student to teacher ratio 22.3
Color(s)          Red & White
Athletics conference University Interscholastic League
Information 281-357-3220
Website

Tomball Senior High School is an accredited public high school in the city of Tomball, Texas. Until 2011, it was the only high school in the Tomball Independent School District, which serves nearly 9,500 students. The high school was newly remodeled (as of 2005) and the cougar statue in front of the school was donated by an artist in Magnolia.

As population in the Tomball area and schools increases, Tomball voters have recently approved a $198 million bond which will fund renovations to Tomball High and other existing schools, as well as the construction of a new high school, Tomball Memorial High School (construction to begin in 2009) which will eventually help to alleviate some of the population pressures on Tomball High School.

History[edit]

In 1908, school was first held in Tomball in the Woodmen of the World building, which was a one room framed building that educated nearly 15 students. The community soon made plans to build a school. Land on Cherry Street was donated, and by 1910 a school was built. The two-story red brick schoolhouse, which was part of the Harris County School System, consisted of two classrooms downstairs and an auditorium upstairs. By 1916, 62 students attended the school. As of 1928, the community grew and consisted of four schools. By 1931, the district employed five teachers.

By 1935, the original schoolhouse was torn down and replaced with a new buff brick building that contained grades one through eleven. Two years later, a petition was presented to the Harris County School Board requesting that Tomball have its own school district. The petition was granted, which transferred all funds and debts to the Tomball Independent School District. The school on Cherry Street had grown so much that by 1938 a second campus was needed. Therefore, the district built a new red brick high school with a gymnasium and a swimming pool, which was located in the 700 block of Main Street.

In 1961, the original high school on Main Street was destroyed after an electrical fire in the school's attic engulfed the building. The Houston Fire Department responded, where the fire fighters dropped a hose into the swimming pool to extinguish the flame. School was dismissed for four days. Churches and other businesses throughout the community offered their facilities so the high school students could complete the school year.

By 1974, students began attending classes at the new Tomball High School on Sandy Lane, later renamed Quinn Road. Continued growth over the decades meant there was a need for additional classrooms. In 2000, voters approved a $98.4 million bond referendum that enabled the district to renovate Tomball High School.

Since that time, Tomball High School has increased its enrollment to over 2,900 students, and earned a Recognized rating from the Texas Education Agency, which determines state accountability ratings based on data collected via the Academic Excellence Indicator System. Tomball High School has also met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards under the federal accountability system. AYP ratings are based on student performance on the TAKS test, the percentage of students participating in the assessment process, and performance on additional indicators such as student attendance and graduation rates.[citation needed]

In 2008 Joanie Gill, an adviser, said that at least half of the student body buys a yearbook. She said obtaining a yearbook "is a tradition. It helps that we are still the only public high school in Tomball. Our junior highs have yearbooks so students and their families learn about them then, and we try to get as many kids in the book as much as possible."[1]

Athletics[edit]

Tomball High School is a member of Region 22-4A of the University Interscholastic League.

Sport Boys Girls
Baseball X -
Basketball X X
Cross-Country X X
Football X
Golf X X
Soccer X X
Softball - X
Swimming & Diving X X
Tennis X X
Track & Field X X
Volleyball - X
Cheerleading X X

Extracurricular activities[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Viren, Sarah. "Yearbooks vanish from Houston schools in Facebook era." Houston Chronicle. Tuesday May 13, 2008. Retrieved on October 25, 2011.
  2. ^ Jones, Allen (November 21, 2010). "Tomball to celebrate 100 years with Dec. 2 birthday bash". ASP Westward. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  3. ^ Puckett, Sarah (November 21, 2010). "Tomball STAGE to present 'Le Mis'". ASP Westward. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  4. ^ Johnson, K.C (June 25, 2011). "Butler knows family values". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  5. ^ Schuman, Anna (February 25, 2009). "Tomball HS grad nominated for top country music award". ASP Westward. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  6. ^ Berardino, Mike (April 7, 2014). "Twinsights: Chris Herrmann explains his growing versatility (with video)". Pioneer-Press. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b Marrion, Jack (July 11, 2011). "Tomball product Russell having All-Star season with Chattanooga". ASP Westward. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  8. ^ Edes, Gordon (March 20, 2013). "Drake Britton faces up to year in jail". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  9. ^ Matthews, Kent (January 13, 2011). "Music: Jimmy Needham looks ahead and way back". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 
  10. ^ Giri, Nisha (November 21, 2010). "Gospel Music Assoc[i]ation reveals nominations for Tomball graduate". ASP Westward. Retrieved May 26, 2014. 

External links[edit]