Town and Country, Missouri

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Town and Country, Missouri
City
Location of Town and Country, Missouri
Location of Town and Country, Missouri
Coordinates: 38°37′52″N 90°28′18″W / 38.63111°N 90.47167°W / 38.63111; -90.47167Coordinates: 38°37′52″N 90°28′18″W / 38.63111°N 90.47167°W / 38.63111; -90.47167
Country United States
State Missouri
County St. Louis
Incorporated 1975 (City)
Government[1]
 • Type Mayor-Board of Alderman-City Administrator
 • Mayor Jon Dalton
Area[2]
 • Total 11.68 sq mi (30.25 km2)
 • Land 11.68 sq mi (30.25 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[3] 590 ft (180 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 10,815
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 10,866
 • Density 925.9/sq mi (357.5/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP 63131
Area code(s) 314
FIPS code 29-73618[6]
GNIS feature ID 0756799[7]
Website http://www.town-and-country.org

Town and Country is a suburb in west St. Louis County, Missouri, United States, with a population of 10,815 as of the 2010 census.[8] Town and Country has the highest median household income ($134,387 in 2009)[3] of any city in Missouri with population over 10,000 and also has one of the highest median incomes of any city in the United States. The city is a suburb of St. Louis and is home to Bellerive Country Club, which hosted the 1992 PGA Championship and 1965 US Open.[9]

Geography[edit]

Town and Country is located at 38°37′52″N 90°28′18″W / 38.63111°N 90.47167°W / 38.63111; -90.47167 (38.631002, -90.471581)[10].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.68 square miles (30.25 km2), all of it land.[2]

Strict residential zoning requirements have maintained large yards and property grounds while unintentionally allowing the continued growth of large populations of white-tailed deer, to the amusement and ire of many residents. The deer population reached unprecedented levels in the 1990s, leading to a city-sponsored program from 1999-2002 that moved deer to rural areas. The Missouri Department of Conservation stopped the program when it found most of the deer were dying from "capture myopathy" due to stress that caused major organs to shut down. A deer control program of sterilization and sharpshooting was subsequently deemed more humane and effective and approved in 2008.[citation needed] The deer population continued to grow and the program was switched to sharpshooting only in 2011-2012.

Primary thoroughfares traversing the city are Interstate-64/Highway 40. I-270, Clayton Road, Ballas Road, Mason Road and Mo. Highway 141, and Ladue Road.[citation needed]

City landscape[edit]

Originally, it was primarily made up of large residential lots. The community first incorporated in 1950 as a village. The incorporation and establishment of a combination Public Safety Department providing three firefighters and one police officer on duty was to provide lower fire insurance rates for residents. The Village changed to city status in 1974 in an effort to increase property taxes. The maximum "Village" tax rate could no longer sustain the modest city government. In 1983 annexation of a large area to the west more than doubled the size of the city. This caused the city to maintain a police department and contract fire and EMS service to a neighboring fire district.

The original country charm of larger lots with white fences and grazing horses is hard to find, however there are a few exceptions. There are several large tracts of land that remain undeveloped.

Town and Country offers a quiet, restful, green residential landscape, in contrast to the more intensely developed areas typical of St. Louis County. There are relatively few commercial development areas. The predominant commercial locations tend to be at the periphery of the city boundaries along the regional arterials, and/or at the intersections of the major roads. Most of the architecture of local business follows strict zoning laws.

History[edit]

Town and Country was incorporated in 1950 as a village [2], and re-incorporated as a fourth-class city 25 years later. [3]

Notable residents[edit]

A sampling of famous residents past and present:[11]

Town and Country is a common birthplace of record for the surrounding area because of its inclusion of Missouri Baptist Medical Center.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop.   ±%  
1950 162 —    
1960 1,440 +788.9%
1970 2,645 +83.7%
1980 3,187 +20.5%
1990 9,519 +198.7%
2000 10,894 +14.4%
2010 10,815 −0.7%
2012 (est.) 10,866 +0.5%

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 10,815 people, 3,591 households, and 2,798 families residing in the city. The population density was 925.9 inhabitants per square mile (357.5 /km2). There were 3,871 housing units at an average density of 331.4 per square mile (128.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 87.8% White, 2.6% African American, 0.1% Native American, 7.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population.

There were 3,591 households of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.2% were married couples living together, 4.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 22.1% were non-families. 17.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.02.

The median age in the city was 48.6 years. 21.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 12.3% were from 25 to 44; 32.4% were from 45 to 64; and 23.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.5% male and 53.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 10,894 people, 3,593 households, and 2,849 families residing in the city. The population density was 916.8 people per square mile (354.1/km²). There were 3,741 housing units at an average density of 314.8 per square mile (121.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.16% White, 2.01% African American, 0.06% Native American, 6.33% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.07% of the population.

There were 3,593 households out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.0% were married couples living together, 4.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.7% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 16.9% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 21.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 87.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $139,967, and the median income for a family was $167,875. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $41,691 for females. The per capita income for the city was $69,347.

Economy[edit]

Charter Communications,[13][14] Energizer Holdings,[15][16] Solutia and Savvis are headquartered in Town and Country.[17][18][19][20]

Education[edit]

Maryville University is in Town and Country.[18][19]

The Principia is a private school for Christian Scientists located on a 360-acre (150 ha) campus in Town and Country.[18] Visitation Academy, a Catholic private all-girls school, is also located in Town and Country. The all-boys Catholic High School, Christian Brothers College (CBC) in located on the North Forty Outer Road. In 2011, Westminster Christian Academy relocated to a new 70 million dollar campus off of Maryville Centre Drive.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Town and Country web site
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ a b City-Data.com
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ "Race, Hispanic or Latino, Age, and Housing Occupancy: 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (QT-PL), Town and Country city, Missouri". U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder 2. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  9. ^ U.S. Open (golf)
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ Kohler, Jeremy (2013-03-18). "Michael J. Roarty dies; oversaw famous A-B ad campaigns". Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 2013-04-06. 
  13. ^ "Corporate Contact Us." Charter Communications. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  14. ^ "Town and County, Mo.-Based Charter Communications to Buy Back Employee Stock." St. Louis Post-Dispatch. January 21, 2004. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  15. ^ "Contact Energizer." Energizer Holdings. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  16. ^ Volkmann, Kelsey. "Energizer to cut jobs as sales slump." St. Louis Business Journal. Tuesday July 28, 2009. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  17. ^ "Town and Country, Mo.-Based Spin-Off Turns to Monsato for Financial Help." St. Louis Post-Dispatch. December 7, 2003. Retrieved on August 19, 2009.
  18. ^ a b c "Zoning Map." City of Town and Country. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  19. ^ a b "Town and Country city." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  20. ^ "Global Offices." Savvis. Retrieved on August 14, 2011. "Corporate Headquarters Savvis 1 Savvis Parkway Town & Country, MO 63017 "

External links[edit]