Venues of the 1964 Summer Olympics

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For the 1964 Summer Olympics, a total of thirty-three sports venues were used. Six of the venues were built before the International Olympic Committee awarded the 1964 Games to Tokyo in 1959. This included two venues that hosted the 1958 Asian Games. There were thirteen new, eight temporary, and five reconstructed and/or renovated venues that were used during the event. During the Olympics, wind and weather had issues with two athletic events. After the Olympics, one venue (Osaka Stadium) hosted both a FIFA World Cup and a World Athletics Championship event while another (Tokyo National Stadium) also hosted a World Athletics Championship event.

Venues[edit]

Venue Sports Capacity Constructed Ref.
Asaka Nezu Park Modern pentathlon (riding) 1,300 Temporary [1]
Asaka Shooting Range Modern pentathlon (shooting), Shooting (pistol/ rifle) 1,200 New [1][2]
Chofu City Athletics (marathon, 50 km walk) Not listed. Temporary [3]
Enoshima Sailing Not listed. New [1]
Fuchu City Athletics (marathon, 50 km walk) Not listed. Temporary [3]
Hachioji City Cycling (road) 3,000 Temporary [1][4]
Hachioji Velodrome Cycling (track) 4,122 Temporary [1][5]
Karasuyama-machi Athletics (marathon, 50 km walk) Not listed. Temporary [1]
Karuizawa Equestrian 1,524 504 (Temporary) [1][6]
Kemigawa Modern pentathlon (running) 1,504 Temporary [1][7]
Komazawa Gymnasium Wrestling 3,875 New [1][8]
Komazawa Hockey Field Field hockey 2,056 (1st field)
3,432 (2nd field)
2,343 (3rd field)
New [1][9]
Komazawa Stadium Football (preliminaries) 20,784 New [1][10]
Komazawa Volleyball Courts Volleyball (preliminaries) 3,908 New [1][11][12]
Korakuen Ice Palace Boxing 4,464 Renovated [1][13]
Lake Sagami Canoeing 1,500 New [1][14]
Mitsuzawa Football Field (Yokohama) Football (preliminaries) 10,102 New [1][15]
Nagai Stadium (Osaka) Football (preliminaries) 20,000 New [16]
National Gymnasium Basketball, Diving, Modern pentathlon (swimming), Swimming 3,929 (basketball)
11,112 (diving, swimming)
New [1][17]
National Stadium Athletics, Equestrian (team jumping), Football (final) 71,556 Extension [1][18]
Nippon Budokan Hall Judo 15,176 New [1][19]
Nishikyogoku Athletic Stadium (Kyoto) Football (preliminaries) 10,000 Existing [20][21]
Ōmiya Football Field (Saitama) Football (preliminaries) 14,392 New [1][22]
Prince Chichiba Memorial Football Field Football (preliminaries) 17,569 Reconstructed [1][23]
Sasazuka-machi Athletics (marathon, 50 km walk) Not listed Temporary [3]
Shibuya Public Hall Weightlifting 2,222 New [1][24][25]
Shinjuku Athletics (marathon, 50 km walk) Not listed Temporary [1]
Toda Rowing Course Rowing 8,262 Reconstructed [1][26]
Tokorozawa Shooting Range Shooting (trap) 1,284 New [1][27]
Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium Gymnastics 6,474 Reconstructed [1][28]
Tokyo Metropolitan Indoor Swimming Pool Water polo 3,014 Reconstructed [1][29]
Waseda Memorial Hall Fencing, Modern pentathlon (fencing) 2,194 Renovated [1][30]
Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium Volleyball 3,784 Renovated [1][31]

Before the Olympics[edit]

Tokyo was selected in 1936 to host the 1940 Summer Olympics, but had to withdraw its hosting duties upon Japan's second invasion of China in the following year.[32][33] This led the organizing committee to abandon organizing the 1940 Games altogether in 1938 with them being awarded to Helsinki though the Finnish city would abandon the 1940 Games themselves in the wake of World War II.[32] After being excluded from the 1948 Summer Olympics due to their involvement in World War II, Japan launched their Olympic bid in 1950 and was selected to host the 1964 Summer Games in 1959.[33]

Lake Sagami was created in 1947 when the Sagami River was dammed.[34] Construction on the lake for the Olympics ran from July 1962 to August 1963.[14] Besides Sagami, the only other venues that had been constructed prior to the International Olympic Committee awarding the 1964 Summer Games to Tokyo were the National Stadium, the Mitsuzawa Football Field, the Nishikyogoku Athletic Stadium, the Prince Chiba Memorial Football Field, the Todo Rowing Course, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Indoor Swimming Pool.[15][18][21][23][26][29] For the 1958 Asian Games held in Tokyo, both the National Stadium and the Tokyo Metropolitan Indoor Swimming Pool were used as venues.[18][29]

During the Olympics[edit]

National Stadium had competitions which were affected by the weather, most notably in the long jump events where the men's event was held against the wind and was kept that way despite protests from American Ralph Boston and Soviet Igor Ter-Ovanesyan to change it to jumping with the wind behind them.[35] In the women's event, British long jumper Mary Rand set a world record of 6.76 m (22 ft 2 in) despite jumping into a 1.69 m/s (3.8 mph) headwind.[36]

Despite the use of electronic timing at the velodrome in the 4000 m team pursuit track cycling event, the judges involved in the final between the German United Team and Italians still took ten minutes to determine who won the gold medal.[37]

Vyacheslav Ivanov would win his third straight gold medal in the single sculls rowing event held at the Todo Rowing Course.[38]

The Metropolitan Indoor Pool had a depth of 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m) which allowed the taller Yugoslav players to stand with their heads above water during the water polo competitions. This resulted in complaints to water polo officials from the Hungarian and Italian teams as a result.[39]

After the Olympics[edit]

The National Stadium played host to the 1991 World Championships in Athletics that included Mike Powell's world record in the men's long jump of 8.95 m (29 ft 4 in) that broke Bob Beamon's world record set at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City.[40][41][42]

Nagai Stadium in Osaka was one of the host stadiums for the 2002 FIFA World Cup, hosting two preliminaries and a quarterfinal match.[43][44][45] The same stadium also served as host venue for the 2007 World Championships in Athletics.[46]

The National Gymnasium was originally constructed as an aquatics venue during the Games and now hosts events such as ice hockey, basketball, and concerts like other indoor arenas.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 115. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  2. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 134. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  3. ^ a b c 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 74-5. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  4. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. p. 263. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  5. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 132-3. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  6. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 136. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  7. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. p. 761. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  8. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 125-6. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  9. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 126-7. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  10. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 124-5. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  11. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 126. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  12. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. p. 621. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  13. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 128-9. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  14. ^ a b 1964 Summer Olympics official report Volume 1, Part 1. p. 131. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  15. ^ a b 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 133-4. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  16. ^ FIFA.com 1964 Summer Olympics Osaka Nagai Stadium 20 October 1964 JPN-YUG match results. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  17. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 121-4. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  18. ^ a b c 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 118-20. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  19. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 128–30. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  20. ^ FIFA.com 1964 Summer Olympics Kyoto Nishikyogoku Athletic Stadium 20 October 1964 ROU-GHA results. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  21. ^ a b Kyoto City Amateur Sports Association stadium profile. Accessed 31 October 2010. (Japanese)
  22. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 133. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  23. ^ a b 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 120. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  24. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 124. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  25. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 2. pp. 401-12. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  26. ^ a b 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 130-1. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  27. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 138-9. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  28. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 120-1. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  29. ^ a b c 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 121. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  30. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 127-8. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  31. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 139. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  32. ^ a b 1940 Summer Olympics official report. pp. 121-2. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  33. ^ a b 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 34-6. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  34. ^ Green Gables information on Lake Sagami. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  35. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Track & Field (Men): Long Jump". In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 221.
  36. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Track & Field (Women):Long Jump". In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. pp. 346-7.
  37. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Cycling: Men's 4000-Meter Team Pursuit". In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited.
  38. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Rowing: Men's Single Sculls" In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 785.
  39. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Water Polo: Men". In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 1053.
  40. ^ IAAF.org World Championships in Athletics Tokyo 23 August - 1 September 1991 results. Accessed 1 November 2010.
  41. ^ IAAF.org World Championships in Athletics Tokyo 30 August 1991 men's long jump final results. Accessed 1 November 2010.
  42. ^ 1968 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 3. Part 2. p. 528. Accessed 1 November 2010.
  43. ^ FIFA.com World Cup Osaka Nagai Stadium 12 June 2002 NGR-ENG match results. Accessed 1 November 2010.
  44. ^ FIFA.com World Cup Osaka Nagai Stadium 14 June 2002 TUN-JPN match results. Accessed 1 November 2010.
  45. ^ FIFA.com World Cup Osaka Nagai Stadium 22 June 2002 SEN-TUR quarterfinal results. Accessed 1 November 2010.
  46. ^ IAAF.org World Championships in Athletics Osaka 24 August - 2 September 2007 results. Accessed 1 November 2010.