1998 Winter Paralympics

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VII Paralympic Winter Games
Nagano 1998 para Winter.png
Host city Nagano, Nagano, Japan
Motto Games from the Heart (Japanese: 心からの大会, Kokorokara no Taikai)
Nations participating 32
Athletes participating 571
Events 122 in 4 sports
Opening ceremony March 5
Closing ceremony March 14
Officially opened by Crown Prince Naruhito
Athlete's Oath Yonoe Ryuei
Paralympic torch Naoya Maruyama (opening and closing) and Haley Heinz Le Mans (closing)
Paralympic stadium M-Wave
Winter
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Summer
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The 1998 Winter Paralympics (第七回パラリンピック冬季競技大会, Dai Shichi-kai Pararinpikku Tōkikyōgi Taikai), the seventh Winter Paralympics, were held alongside the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan from March 5 to March 14, 1998. They were the first Paralympic Winter Games to be held outside Europe. 571 athletes competed in Nagano; it still remains the highest number of athletes competing at any Winter Paralympics.[1]

Sports[edit]

The games consisted of 34 events in four sports: alpine skiing, ice sledge hockey, Ice sledge racing, and nordic skiing. The sport of Nordic skiing comprised two disciplines, the biathlon and cross-country skiing.[2][3]

Venues[edit]

In total 7 venues were used at the 1998 Winter Olympics around 4 cities and towns.[4]

Nagano[edit]

Hakuba[edit]

Nozawaonsen[edit]

Yamanouchi[edit]

Medal table[edit]

The top 10 NPCs by number of gold medals are listed below. The host nation (Japan) is highlighted.

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Norway 18 9 13 40
2  Germany 14 17 13 44
3  United States 13 8 13 34
4  Japan 12 16 13 41
5  Russia 12 10 9 31
6  Switzerland 10 5 8 23
7  Spain 8 0 0 8
8  Austria 7 16 11 34
9  Finland 7 5 7 19
10  France 5 9 8 22

Other information[edit]

The theme of the Opening Ceremony was Hope, and inspired by a painting by George Frederic Watts. The theme also signifies it was the first Winter Paralympics held in Asia and the last Paralympics of the 20th century.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Winter Games Overview". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 16 September 2016. 
  2. ^ "Nagano 1998". International Paralympic Committee. 4 October 2009. Archived from the original on 4 October 2009. 
  3. ^ a b "Nagano 1998". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 16 September 2016. 
  4. ^ "Schedule of the Nagano Paralympics". Retrieved 29 October 2016. 

External links[edit]