626

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
626 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 626
DCXXVI
Ab urbe condita 1379
Armenian calendar 75
ԹՎ ՀԵ
Assyrian calendar 5376
Balinese saka calendar 547–548
Bengali calendar 33
Berber calendar 1576
Buddhist calendar 1170
Burmese calendar −12
Byzantine calendar 6134–6135
Chinese calendar 乙酉(Wood Rooster)
3322 or 3262
    — to —
丙戌年 (Fire Dog)
3323 or 3263
Coptic calendar 342–343
Discordian calendar 1792
Ethiopian calendar 618–619
Hebrew calendar 4386–4387
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 682–683
 - Shaka Samvat 547–548
 - Kali Yuga 3726–3727
Holocene calendar 10626
Iranian calendar 4–5
Islamic calendar 4–5
Japanese calendar N/A
Javanese calendar 516–517
Julian calendar 626
DCXXVI
Korean calendar 2959
Minguo calendar 1286 before ROC
民前1286年
Nanakshahi calendar −842
Seleucid era 937/938 AG
Thai solar calendar 1168–1169
Tibetan calendar 阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
752 or 371 or −401
    — to —
阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
753 or 372 or −400
Emperor Tai Zong of the Tang dynasty

Year 626 (DCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 626 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Persia[edit]

  • Summer – King Khosrau II plans an all-out effort against Constantinople. He returns to Anatolia with two armies of unknown size, presumably more than 50,000 men each. One of these (possibly commanded by Khosrau himself) is to contain Heraclius in Pontus; another under Shahin Vahmanzadegan is defeated by Theodore.

Asia[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Walls of Constantinople AD 324–1453, p. 47. Stephen Turnbull, 2004. ISBN 978-1-84176-759-8
  2. ^ Bede, H. E. Book II, chapter 9. Bede calls these two islands the Mevanian Islands
  3. ^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Manuscript A (ASC A), 626