610s

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

The 610s decade ran from January 1, 610, to December 31, 619.

Events

610

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
  • October 4Heraclian revolt: Heraclius arrives with a fleet from Africa at Constantinople. Assisted by an uprising in the capital, he overthrows and personally beheads Emperor Phocas. Heraclius gains the throne with help from his father Heraclius the Elder. His first major act is to change the official language of the Eastern Roman Empire from Latin to Greek (already the language of the vast majority of the population). Because of this, after AD 610, the Empire is customarily referred to as the Byzantine Empire (the term Byzantine is a modern term invented by historians in the 18th century; the people of the Empire itself always referred to themselves as "Ρωμαῖος" — tr. Rōmaios, Roman).
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]
  • Paper technology is imported into Japan from China by the Korean Buddhist priest, Dam Jing (approximate date).
Religion[edit]

611

By place[edit]

Persian Empire[edit]
Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

612

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]
Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

613

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • Islam: Muhammad begins preaching in public. He spreads the message of Islam and encourages a personal devotion to God. Quraysh leaders of Mecca oppose any change in the traditional tribal and religious customs.

614

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

615

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

616

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

617

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

618

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

619

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]
Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

610

611

612

613

614

615

616

617

618

619

Deaths[edit]

610

611

612

613

614

615

616

617

618

619

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hodgkin, Thomas. Italy and Her Invaders (vol. 5), p. 160
  2. ^ Donini, Guido and Ford, Gordon B., Jr., translators (1966). Isidore of Seville's History of the Kings of the Goths, Vandals, and Suevi. Leiden: E. J. Brill. Chapter 58, p. 27
  3. ^ Essential Histories: The Great Islamic Conquests AD 632–750 (2009), David Nicolle, p. 22. ISBN 978-1-84603-273-8
  4. ^ Brooks "Mellitus (d. 624)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  5. ^ Edmonds, Columba (1908) "St. Columbanus". The Catholic Encyclopedia 4. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 15 January 2013
  6. ^ Wang, Eugene Yuejin (2005). Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China. University of Washington Press. p. 321. ISBN 978-0-295-98462-9.
  7. ^ Roger Collins, "Visigothic Spain 409–711", (Blackwell Publishing, 2004), p. 75
  8. ^ "KBS World". Archived from the original on May 25, 2013. Retrieved March 27, 2013.
  9. ^ "Association for Asia Research- The forgotten glory of Koguryo". Archived from the original on February 28, 2009. Retrieved March 27, 2013.
  10. ^ Walter Emil Kaegi (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 75. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  11. ^ Foss 1975.
  12. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (E) records this battle under the year 605, but this is considered incorrect; see Michael Swanton's translation of the ASC (1996, 1998, paperback), page 23, note 2. Between 613/616 is the generally accepted date, as first proposed by Charles Plummer, Venerabilis Beda Opera Historica (1896)
  13. ^ Crawford, Peter (2013). The War of the Three Gods: Romans, Persians and the Rise of Islam. Pen and Sword. p. 41-43. ISBN 9781473828650.
  14. ^ Alan Harding, "Medieval Law and the Foundations of the State", (Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 14
  15. ^ S. Wise Bauer, "The History of the Medieval World: From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade", W.W. Norton & Company, 2010), p. 251
  16. ^ a b Fine 1991, p. 34.
  17. ^ John Morris (1995) "The Age of Arthur", p. 307. ISBN 1-84212-477-3
  18. ^ Fine 1991, p. 41.
  19. ^ Fine 1991, p. 35.
  20. ^ Raymond Davis (translator), "The Book of Pontiffs (Liber Pontificalis)", first edition (Liverpool: University Press, 1989, p. 63
  21. ^ St Dunawd, GENUKI
  22. ^ Alford Welch, "Muhammad", Encyclopedia of Islam
  23. ^ An Introduction to the Quran (1895), p. 185
  24. ^ Bede, "Ecclesiastical History", Book II, Chapter 12
  25. ^ a b Greatrex & Lieu 2002, p. 198.
  26. ^ Foss 1975, p. 724.
  27. ^ Fine 1991, p. 42.
  28. ^ Golden 1992, p. 135. According to Chinese historical sources, the marriage was never carried out because of interference by the Eastern Göktürk Illig Qaghan, whose territory sat between his territory and Tang territory, and who felt threatened by the proposed marriage. Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 192.
  29. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  30. ^ Frye 1983, p. 169.
  31. ^ Greatrex & Lieu 2002, p. 196.
  32. ^ Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1962). "Sovereign and Subject", p. 216–220
  33. ^ "Saint Deusdedit | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 14 July 2021.
  34. ^ Bellenger, Dominic Aidan; Fletcher, Stella (17 February 2005). The Mitre and the Crown: A History of the Archbishops of Canterbury. History Press. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-7524-9495-1.

Sources[edit]