African Nations Championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
African Nations Championship
African Nations Championship official logo.png
Founded 2009
Region Africa (CAF)
Number of teams 16
Current champions Morocco Morocco (1st title)
Most successful team(s) Democratic Republic of the Congo DR Congo (2 titles)

The Total African Nations Championship (sometimes referred to as African Championship of Nations or CHAN) is a football tournament which was first announced on 11 September 2007.[1] It is administered by the Confederation of African Football (CAF) and is played between the best national teams of Africa, exclusively featuring players who are active in the national championships and qualified to play in the ongoing season. Expatriate players, regardless of where they play, even in Africa, are not qualified to take part in the African Championship of Nations.

The first tournament was held in 2009. It was hosted by Ivory Coast and won by DR Congo. The competition was expanded to 16 teams for the second tournament, held in Sudan in 2011.[2][3] The tournament was won by Tunisia, in the wake of the Tunisian Revolution.[4]

The tournament is held every two years[5], alternating with the Africa Cup of Nations.

History[edit]

The creation of the African Nations Championship was a response to the desire to revive or strengthen national competitions regularly weakened by a mass exodus of top players who leave their home countries to play for foreign teams which will pay more and get them more media coverage. Starting from the 2014 edition onwards, all of the matches are recognized by FIFA as first team matches.[6][7]

Sponsorship[edit]

In July 2016, Total secured an eight-year sponsorship package from the Confederation of African Football (CAF) to support 10 of its principal competitions.[8] Due to this sponsorship, the African Nations Championship is named "Total African Nations Championship".

Qualifying[edit]

The eight tournament spots, for the first edition in 2009, were allocated the following way:

  • One each for North Zone, Zone West A, Zone West B, Centre Zone and Central-East Zone
  • Two for the Southern Zone
  • One for the host country of the final tournament[9]

Since the second edition, in 2011, 16 teams qualify for the tournament, allocated this way (including host country):

  • 2 each for North Zone and Zone West A
  • 3 each for Zone West B, Central Zone, Central-East Zone and Southern Zone[10]

Tournament format[edit]

The group stage of the African Nations Championship features pools of four teams drawn at random. The top two teams from each group advance to the knockout stage.

On 8 March 2009, Democratic Republic of the Congo defeated Ghana 2–0[11] to become the first winner of the tournament.

Results[edit]

Summaries[edit]

Year Host Number of teams Final Third Place Match
Champion Score Second Place Third Place Score Fourth Place
2009
Details
 Ivory Coast 8  DR Congo 2–0
Ghana

Zambia
2–1
Senegal
2011
Details
 Sudan 16
Tunisia
3–0
Angola

Sudan
1–0
Algeria
2014
Details
 South Africa 16
Libya
0 – 0
(4–3 pen.)

Ghana

Nigeria
1–0
Zimbabwe
2016
Details
 Rwanda 16  DR Congo 3–0
Mali

Ivory Coast
2–1
Guinea
2018
Details
 Morocco 16
Morocco
4–0
Nigeria

Sudan
1 – 1
(4–2 pen.)

Libya
2020
Details
 Ethiopia 16 Future event Future event
2022
Details
TBD TBD Future event Future event

Performance by nation[edit]

Team Champions Runners-up Third-place Fourth-place
 DR Congo 2 (2009, 2016)
 Libya 1 (2014) 1 (2018)
 Tunisia 1 (2011) -
 Morocco 1 (2018*)
 Ghana 2 (2009, 2014)
 Nigeria 1 (2018) 1 (2014)
 Angola 1 (2011)
 Mali 1 (2016)
 Sudan 2 (2011*, 2018)
 Ivory Coast 1 (2016)
 Zambia 1 (2009)
 Algeria 1 (2011)
 Guinea 1 (2016)
 Senegal 1 (2009)
 Zimbabwe 1 (2014)

* hosts.

Champions by region[edit]

Federation (Region) Champion(s) Number
UNAF (North Africa) Libya (1), Morocco (1), Tunisia (1) 3 titles
UNIFFAC (Central Africa) DR Congo (2) 2 titles
WAFU (West Africa) None 0 titles
CECAFA (East Africa) None 0 titles
COSAFA (Southern Africa) None 0 titles

Participating nations[edit]

Team Ivory Coast
2009
Sudan
2011
South Africa
2014
Rwanda
2016
Morocco
2018
Ethiopia
2020
Years
 Algeria 4th 1
 Angola 2nd GS QF 3
 Burkina Faso GS GS 2
 Burundi GS 1
 Cameroon QF QF GS 3
 Congo GS QF 2
 DR Congo 1st QF QF 1st 4
 Ivory Coast GS GS 3rd GS 4
 Equatorial Guinea GS 1
 Ethiopia GS GS q 3
 Gabon GS QF GS 3
 Ghana 2nd GS 2nd 3
 Guinea 4th GS 2
 Libya GS 1st 4th 3
 Mali GS QF 2nd 3
 Mauritania GS GS 2
 Morocco QF GS 1st 3
 Mozambique GS 1
 Namibia QF 1
 Niger QF GS 2
 Nigeria 3rd GS 2nd 3
 Rwanda GS QF GS 3
 Senegal 4th GS 2
 South Africa QF GS 2
 Sudan 3rd 3rd 2
 Tanzania GS 1
 Tunisia 1st QF 2
 Uganda GS GS GS GS 4
 Zambia 3rd QF QF 3
 Zimbabwe GS GS 4th GS 4
Total 8 16 16 16 16 16
Legend

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New tournament for Africa". BBC Sport. 11 September 2007. 
  2. ^ Sannie, Ibrahim (28 February 2009). "CAF plans to expand CHAN". BBC Sport. Retrieved 21 May 2009. 
  3. ^ "CAF Executive Committee Decisions". Cafonline. 19 September 2009. Archived from the original on 18 December 2008. Retrieved 21 July 2010. 
  4. ^ "Tunisia beat Angola in the CHAN final in Sudan". BBC Sport. 25 February 2011. Retrieved 1 March 2011. 
  5. ^ "Ghana 'favourites' to host 2018 CHAN after WAFU Nations Cup success". social_image. Retrieved 2017-11-27. 
  6. ^ "African Nations Championship in Rwanda gives domestic talent a chance". The Guardian. 15 January 2016. Retrieved 19 June 2016. 
  7. ^ "Nigeria 'do not have A and B teams' says Oliseh ahead of Nations Championship". The National. 15 January 2016. Retrieved 19 June 2016. 
  8. ^ AfricaNews (2017-04-18). "Total to sponsor CAF competitions for the next eight years". Africanews. Retrieved 2017-04-18. 
  9. ^ CAF Online: New Competition launched : African Championship of Nations Archived November 21, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ http://www.cafonline.com/competition/african-nations-championship_2011/qualifiers
  11. ^ "DR Congo lift CHAN trophy". BBC Sport. 8 March 2009. 

External links[edit]