Amal El-Mohtar

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Amal El-Mohtar
Amal El-Mohtar.jpg
Born 1984/1985 (age 33–34)[1]
Occupation Writer
Language English
Genre Science fiction, fantasy
Notable awards Hugo Award for Best Short Story, Nebula Award for Best Short Story

Amal El-Mohtar is a Canadian poet and writer of speculative fiction.[2] She has published short fiction, poetry, essays and reviews, and has edited the fantastic poetry quarterly magazine Goblin Fruit since 2006.[3]

Beginning in February 2018, she reviews science fiction and fantasy books for the New York Times Book Review.[4] She lives in Ottawa, Ontario where she has worked as a creative writing instructor at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa.[1]

Awards and nominations[edit]

El-Mohtar has received the following awards:

Other awards her short fiction has been nominated for include the 2010 Nebula Award (for "The Green Book");[10] the 2016 Nebula Award (for "Madeleine");[11] the 2016 World Fantasy Award (for "Pockets");[12] and the 2017 World Fantasy Award (for "Seasons of Glass and Iron").[13]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Blackmore, Olivia (15 August 2017). "Ottawa writer's 'fairy-tale mashup' wins prestigious Hugo Award for science-fiction". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 5 February 2018. 
  2. ^ McDermott, J. M. (November 2011). "Nebula Awards Interview: Amal El-Mohtar". Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  3. ^ El-Mohtar, Amal (25 October 2013). "Interview: Amal El-Mohtar". Amazing Stories (Interview). Interviewed by Diane Severson Mori. Retrieved 20 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "Amal El-Mohtar Replaces N.K. Jemisin as The New York Times Book Review's Otherworldly Columnist". Tor.com. 29 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018. 
  5. ^ "SFPA Rhysling Award Archive". Archived from the original on 29 August 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  6. ^ "2015 Locus Awards Winners". Locus. 27 June 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  7. ^ "Announcing the 2016 Nebula Awards Winners". Tor.com. 21 May 2017. Retrieved 21 May 2017. 
  8. ^ "2015 Locus Awards Winners". Locus. 27 June 2017. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  9. ^ "2017 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  10. ^ "SFWA announces the 2010 Nebula Award Nominees". 22 February 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  11. ^ "Nebula Awards". SFWA. Retrieved 18 June 2016. 
  12. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 2016". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  13. ^ "Nominees". World Fantasy Convention. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 

External links[edit]