Arika

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This article is about the Japanese video game developer. For the fictional character from the anime and manga series My-Otome, see Arika Yumemiya. For the Japanese botanist, see Arika Kimura.
Arika Co.,Ltd.
株式会社アリカ
Kabushiki gaisha
Industry Video game industry
Founded November 1, 1995
Headquarters Tokyo, Japan
Key people
Akira Nishitani (President)
Number of employees
50
Website www.arika.co.jp

Arika (アリカ?) is a Japanese video game developer. It was formed in 1995 by former Capcom employees. The name of the company itself is the reverse of the name of the company's founder, Akira Nishitani (Nin Nin), who (along with Akiman) created Street Fighter II. Arika's first arcade game was Street Fighter EX. It was successful and was followed up with two updates (Street Fighter EX + and EX + α for the PlayStation), and then two sequels on the arcade and PlayStation 2.

Arika is well known for the Tetris: The Grand Master series and Cardcaptor Sakura series. A recent notable game by the developer is Endless Ocean, a scuba diving game for the Wii.

Games developed[edit]

Street Fighter EX series[edit]

Nintendo-published Games and Classic Games[edit]

3D Classics[edit]

Other games developed[edit]

Under development[edit]

In July 2011, a video from an Arika 3DS test project, currently called Fighting Sample, was released, featuring Hokuto and Kairi from the Street Fighter EX series.[1] Further screenshots show Blair, Doctrine Dark and Shadow Geist. Unfortunately, the project was revealed to be an April Fools joke, and the project was cancelled. [2]

Tetris: The Grand Master 4: Masters of Round has been shown to be in development multiple times since as early as 2009. However, it was cancelled later on due to various reasons, including copyright infringements with regards to emulation and various fan-developed clones of TGM, most notably Texmaster2009.[3] TGM4 has been uncancelled again recently; The Grand Master 2015 was announced and playtested in both Japan and the United States in June 2015. This playtest was not officially licensed by The Tetris Company, and it is unclear whether we will ever see a TGM4.

Not long after completion, a Tetris the Absolute: The Grand Master 2 PLUS port to the PlayStation 2 was shown to be in development. Due to unknown reasons, the port wasn't licensed and was never released.[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]