BYJU'S

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Think and Learn Private Ltd.[1][2]
Private
IndustryEdtech, distance education, m-learning
Founded2011; 8 years ago (2011)[3]
FounderByju Ravindran (Founder, CEO)[1][4]
Headquarters,
Area served
Multinational
ProductsBYJU’S - The Learning App
RevenueIncrease 5,200 million (US$75 million or €67 million) (2018)[5]
Total equity$5.4 billion (2019[6])
Number of employees
3200 (2019[7])
SubsidiariesTutorVista, Osmo
Websitebyjus.com

BYJU’S - The Learning App is the common brand name for Think and Learn Private Ltd., a Bangalore-based educational technology (edtech) and online tutoring firm founded in 2011 by Byju Ravindran at Bengaluru (India). In March 2019, it was the world’s most valued edtech company at $5.4 billion (Rs 37,000 crore). Shah Rukh Khan is the brand ambassador for BYJU'S.

Products and Services[edit]

BYJU’S works on a freemium model.[8] Free access to content is limited to 15 days after the registration.[8][9]

Their main product is a mobile app named BYJU'S-The Learning App launched in August 2015.[10] It provides educational content mainly to school students from class 1 to 12 (primary to higher secondary level education).[4] The company trains students for examinations in India such as IIT-JEE, NEET, CAT, IAS as well as for international examinations such as GRE and GMAT.[11]

The main focus is on mathematics and science, where concepts are explained using 12-20 minute digital animation videos.[12][13][14] BYJU'S reports to have 33 million users overall, 2.2 million annual paid subscribers and an annual retention rate of about 85%.[15][16] The app purports to tailor the content provided to the individual student’s learning pace and style.[17] The average student spends 53 minutes daily using BYJU'S.[18]

The company announced that it will launch its app in regional Indian languages in 2019.[19][4] It also plans to launch an international version of the app for English-speaking students in other countries in 2019.[20][21]

History[edit]

BYJU’S app was developed by Think and Learn Pvt Ltd, established by Byju Raveendran in 2011.[1][3] Raveendran, who was trained as an engineer, started coaching students to pass mathematics exams in 2006.[1] In 2011 he founded an educational company with the help of his students offering online video-based learning programs for the K-12 segment as well as competition exams.[22][23] In 2012 Think and Learn entered both Deloitte Technology Fast50 India and Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific ratings and has been present there ever since.[3][24]

In August 2015, after 4 years of developments, the firm launched BYJU’S The Learning App.[25][22] The app was downloaded by more than 2 million students within the first 3 months since its launch.[3] In December 2016, the app was among "Best Self Improvement" apps at Google Play India rating.[26]

In 2017, Think and Learn launched BYJU’S Math App for kids and BYJU’S Parent Connect app to help parents track their child’s learning course.[27][28] BYJU’S app also became a business case at Harvard Business School.[29][30] By 2018, it had 15 million users and 900,000 paid users.[4][31].

Acquisitions[edit]

In July 2017, Think and Learn acquired TutorVista (including Edurite) from Pearson.[32][33][34]

In January 2019, BYJU’S acquired a US-based Osmo, a maker of educational games for children aged 3-8 years for $120 million.[35]

Funding and financials[edit]

BYJU’S received seed funding from Aarin Capital in 2013.[36]

As of 2019, BYJU’S has secured nearly $785 million in funding from investors, including Sequoia Capital India, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), Tencent, Sofina, Lightspeed Venture Partners, Brussels-based family office Verlinvest, development finance institution IFC, Napsters Ventures, CPPIB and General Atlantic.[31][37][38] BYJU’S was the first company in Asia to receive an investment from Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative (co-funded by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan).[39][40][41]

As per the company filings with the Ministry of Corporate Affairs, BYJU’S became a unicorn and is valued at US$1 billion (INR 6,505 Crore) as of March 2018.[42][37]

BYJU'S operates roughly on a premium business model where a paid subscription is required for most of the content.[12] In 2017, BYJU’s generated revenues of about 260 crore (US $40 million or €33 million) and doubled it 2018 financial year, earning 520 crore.[2][5] BYJU’S has targeted a revenue of 1400 crores for 2019 financial year.[43]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award or recognition Type of award Result/ranking
2017 Express IT Awards Personal Won[44]
2017 Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific Company 126[45]
2016 Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific Company 115[46]
2015 Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific Company 167[47]
2014 Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific Company 329[48]
2013 Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific Company 176[49]
2012 Deloitte Technology Fast 500 Asia Pacific Company 321[50]
2016 Wharton Reimagine Education Overall Ed Tech Award (Best Educational App) Company Won[51][52]
2016 VCCircle Awards (Education company of the year) Company Won[53][12]
2017 FT/IFC Transformational Business Awards Company Nominated[54]
2016 Future of India Awards Company Won[55]
2016 Global Mobile App Summit & Awards (Education) Company Won[56]
2010 CNBC TV18 CRISIL Emerging India Award (Education) Company Won[12]
2017 CNBC TV18 India Business Leader Awards (Young Turk of the Year) Company Won[57]
2018 Business Standard Annual Awards for Corporate Excellence Company Won[58]
2017 Amazon Web Services Mobility Awards (Established Education App of the Year) Company Won
2018 EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award (Start up) Personal Won[59]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External Links[edit]