Castaways (casino)

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Castaways Hotel and Casino
Location Paradise, Nevada
Address Las Vegas Boulevard
Opening date1963
Closing dateJuly 20, 1987; 32 years ago (July 20, 1987)
ThemePolynesia
Signature attractionsGateway to Luck
Casino typeLand
Coordinates36°07′16″N 115°10′31″W / 36.12111°N 115.17528°W / 36.12111; -115.17528Coordinates: 36°07′16″N 115°10′31″W / 36.12111°N 115.17528°W / 36.12111; -115.17528

The Castaways was a hotel and casino in Paradise, Nevada that operated from 1963 to 1987 on the Las Vegas Strip.

History[edit]

The property had originally been San Souci Auto Court, an early motel which opened in the 1930s, and developed into Sans Souci Hotel in the 1950s.[1]

In August 1963, Mississippi oilman Ike P. Larue Jr. planned to purchase the Sans Souci hotel-casino and rename it as the Castaways Casino.[2] Larue closed the casino portion on December 31, 1964, due to financial problems. The hotel, restaurant and bar remained open. In August 1965, four men – three Californians and a Las Vegas resident – planned to reopen the casino and invest $300,000 to for eight table games and 70 slot machines.[3] The Castaways had a 1500-gallon aquarium in its bar. Three times a day, a show was put on by naked showgirls in the aquarium.[4]

In 1967, the Castaways was sold to billionaire Howard Hughes for $3 million as part of his spree of buying Las Vegas properties.[5]

The Castaways Hotel and Casino closed on July 20, 1987, with plans to demolish it in the coming months to make room for a new resort being planned by Steve Wynn.[6] Wynn's resort opened as The Mirage on November 22, 1989, occupying a portion of the Castaways land.

Attractions[edit]

Gateway to Luck[edit]

A historic wooden temple St. Louis Jain temple, originally a part of the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, stood besides the pool. It has now been reconstructed at the Jain Center of Southern California, Los Angeles.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vintage Las Vegas (24 August 2017). "Las Vegas Strip index".
  2. ^ "Two Denial Recommendations Mark Game Board Meet". Nevada State Journal. August 7, 1963. Retrieved March 1, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Gaming Board Reviews Nevada License Bids". Nevada State journal. August 6, 1965. Retrieved March 1, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Padgett, Sonya (January 3, 2008). "Live Art: Flipping Over Fish". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on February 6, 2008.
  5. ^ "Howard Hughes Buys". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Las Vegas Review-Journal. 23 September 1967.
  6. ^ "Teary-Eyed Dealers Bid Casino Farewell". San Jose Mercury News. July 20, 1987. Retrieved March 1, 2019 – via NewsLibrary.

External links[edit]